Durham Cathedral Library Van Mildert Letters
Introduction
Biography
Contents
Arrangement
Related material - elsewhere
Bibliography

Catalogue
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1832
1833
1834
1835

Reference code: GB-0036-VML
Title: Durham Cathedral Library Van Mildert Letters
Dates of creation: 1826-1835
Extent: 0.5 metres
Held by: Durham Cathedral Library
Origination: Created by William Van Mildert bishop of Durham
Language: English with occasional Latin phrases

Biography

William Van Mildert (1765-1836), bishop of Durham (1826-1836), was born 6th November 1765 in Southwark, the son of Cornelius Van Mildert (1722-1799), gin distiller, and his wife, Martha, née Hill (1732-1804). Van Mildert studied at the Merchant Taylors' School, and Queen's College, Oxford, 1784-90. Ordained priest in 1789, in 1790 he became curate of Witham, Essex were he met Jane (1760-1837), daughter of General Douglas, whom he married in 1795. In 1795 Van Mildert was given the living of Bradden, Northamptonshire, by Cornelius Ives, his cousin and brother-in-law; in 1796, he became chaplain to the Grocers' Company and rector of St Mary-le-Bow, Cheapside, London. In London he joined the high-church campaigning group the Hackney Phalanx, served as treasurer of the SPCK 1812-15, gave the Boyle lectures of 1802-5, was preacher of Lincoln's Inn, 1812-9, Bampton lecturer in 1814, and in 1823 published a ten-volume edition of the works of Daniel Waterland. In 1813 he became regius professor of divinity at Oxford and a canon of Christ Church, bishop of Llandaff May 1819, declined the archbishopric of Dublin in 1820, instead becoming dean of St Paul's in commendam with Llandaff, and in 1826 Van Mildert became bishop of Durham.
The University of Durham was founded in 1832, primarily through the vision and determination of Van Mildert, and Charles Thorp, archdeacon of Durham and prebendary of Durham Cathedral. Van Mildert and Thorp saw the foundation of a university in Durham as a way of deflecting popular criticism of church wealth, and averting the danger that, unless the church itself redeployed some of its surplus, a reforming government would wield the scythe for it. They were eventually successful in persuading the dean and chapter of Durham to support the scheme and redeploy some of their property to provide an endowment. The struggle to win recognition and adequate endowment for the fledgling institution had to continue after Van Mildert's death in 1836 under his successor as bishop, Edward Maltby.

Contents

Letters of William Van Mildert as dean of St Paul's and (mostly) bishop of Durham to Charles Thorp as rector of Ryton and then (mostly) as archdeacon and prebend of Durham, and first warden of Durham university. Most of the business concerns the administration of the diocese and especially its clergy, including issues over ordinations, institutions, promotions, consecrations and endowments of new churches, confirmations, charges, sermons (especially who was to give the assize sermons). Secondarily was the considerable matter of the establishment of the university in Durham. This seems to have had a relatively short gestation judging from this correspondence, and there is much that is little discussed such as the curriculum, recruitment of students and even Thorp's own appointment as warden, but there is much about getting the act passed in 1832, apportioning stalls to professorships, and recruiting the academics. Aside from these topics, Van Mildert's own health is much reported, necessitating trips to Harrogate for the waters, and he is also concerned for the poor health of his wife, and that of Thorp himself. There are also occasional sidelights on some of the major issues of the day concerning parliament through Van Mildert's attendance at the House of Lords. Van Mildert is often in these letters trying to arrange meetings with Thorp to discuss matters in person. There are also some letters from others, generally forwarded to Thorp or discussed by Van Mildert in his letters. However, there are many more cited as enclosed with his letters which are no longer extant in this collection, and there is only rarely surviving a letter from Thorp where the issues were often obviously more clearly delineated than in Van Mildert's replies which often do not give a clear overview of the matter being discussed.

Accession details

This collection was almost certainly originally one with the Charles Thorp Correspondence in Durham University Library as the two comprise essentially the same material. It seems that when Dean Kitchin bequeathed the Thorp Correspondence to the university, these other letters had already been separated out probably by him and possibly with a view to producing some sort of study of Van Mildert, along the lines of those of other bishops published in Seven Sages of Durham (1911). Whatever, these letters seem always to have been in the Cathedral Library since at least then.

Conditions of access

Open for consultation.

Copyright and copying

Permission to make any published use of material from the collection must be sought in advance from the Librarian and, where appropriate, from the copyright owner. The Library will assist where possible with identifying copyright owners, but responsibility for ensuring copyright clearance rests with the user of the material

Arrangement

Arranged in chronological order.

Processing

Initial sorting and packaging was carried out in the c.1980s by Roger Norris. In January to November 2010, the final sorting, calendaring and in some cases full transcription into XML, along with numbering and boxing was carried out by Michael Stansfield, with some assistance from Melanie MacSporran.

Related material - elsewhere

Durham University Library, Special Collections Charles Thorp Correspondence (reference THO) comprises in many cases similar letters from Van Mildert to Thorp.

Bibliography

Described, with occasional extracts, in:
A. Orde, “William Van Mildert, Charles Thorp, and the Diocese of Durham”, Northern History (XL No.1, March 2003), p.147-166.

Catalogue

1826
VML 1-2   5 May 1826
Letter from WVM at the Deanery, St Paul's to CT at Ryton
“I have been prevented by a great pressure of business from acknowledging several letters of yours as soon as I had intended to do. I request you to accept this as an apology for my unintentional neglect, & to accept also my best thanks for your very obliging congratulations, & for the services you are disposed to render me; of which I should be happy to avail myself until I may be able to spare you the trouble. Respecting Reed, I entirely approve of the arrangement that he should be ordained as your second curate at Ryton, and that your present second curate should be removed to warden. I have now received all of Mr Reeds papers, and find them correct; his College Testimonial having arrived only a day or two ago. I could wish, however, his ordination to be postponed until after my arrival at Auckland, when I may perhaps hold a private ordination for one or two candidates whose services are most immediately wanted, previous to the general ordination at Michaelmas. If you have not yet examined him, there will be time enough to do so, & to let me know the result. Mr Roger's papers I have also received; but the want of a regular education is an objection, except under very special circumstances, I consider as insurmountable. In all cases, I should give a preference to candidates from one of our universities, though I should not object to receiving candidates from the institution of St Bees, which I know to be conducted by Dr Singer in the most satisfactory manor. To literates who have not been at that institution I can not hold out the same encouragement. In Mr Rogers's case nothing appears which should induce me to relax the rule in his favour. You will oblige me by explaining this matter to Dr Thomas. I understand from Dr Phillpotts that Mr Headlam of Wyclife is looking out for a curate for Cockfield. I shall be glad to know what further information you have been able to obtain respecting the circumstances of the incumbent there. Nothing further occurs to me, which I need trouble you at present.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper (part)
VML 3-4   24 May 1826
Letter from WVM at the Deanery St Paul's to CT at the Union Hotel, Cockspur St
“I am sorry that I was not at home when you did me the favour of calling here. Tomorrow I should be engaged almost the whole day in attending the anniversary of the sons of the clergy. If you can call on Friday or Saturday before eleven o'clock I shall be happy to see you.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 5   21 June 1826
Letter from WVM at the Deanery, St Paul's to CT at Ryton
“I thank you for your letter of the 16th. It is satisfactory to know that poor Mr Barrett & his relatives were in any degree comforted by the token delivered to them through your hands. Todays post has brought me a printed statement of the proceedings at Ryton respecting the late melancholy accident. You were to let me know to what extent assistance might be wanted for the survivors of the unhappy persons who suffered. Judging, however, from the paper before me, I am desirous of subscribing fifty pounds, and request you to consider this as authorizing you to call upon Mr Faber at Auckland to remit that sum on my account. I will write also to Mr Faber to desire him to answer the demand. I am still harassed by some uncertainty on what day I am to take possession of the house on Hanover Square & also in preparations for removing thithier, as well as for my journey northward. I hope, however, to leave here in the course of the week after next and to make my entry into the city of Durham two or three days before the Assizes. I begin to think that it can hardly be desirable to hold a private ordination at Auckland so short a time before the general ordination at Durham in September. Not more than a month could be gained by it, which seems hardly to call for the additional trouble. Perhaps you will give me your opinion of the matter. ”
Paper, 2f
VML 6-7A   13 August 1826
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“So many difficulties arise in the arrangement of the intended confirmations, that I am desirous of setting apart an hour or two for the express consideration of them, with yourself and Mr Griffith of Newcastle, or any other person whom you may think most competent to assist in your conference; and for that purpose I shall be glad to meet you at Durham Castle on Tuesday at Twelve o'clock. We might then also see Mr Burrell & Mr Darrell about the Shincliffe chapel; & when our plans are determined, might leave directions to have the necessary papers printed forthwith and put into immediate circulation. I see no other way of getting over all the perplexities, that now beset us. Should it be impracticable for you to meet me at Durham on Tuesday, I wd postpone it to Wednesday - but shd prefer the former day. I think, much of the difficulty has arisen from my intention being misunderstood. I had originally no intention of holding anything like a general Confirmation, but meant only to relieve any pressing exigency by confirming in a limited number of populous Parishes, for those Parishes only, & not for all the neighbouring towns or villages; & to this plan I think I must now adhere, & make it publickly known that as there is to be a general Confirmation next year, it will not extend this year beyond the places specified in the notice. Mr Griffith evidently seems to suppose that my Confirmation at Newcastle is intented for the whole County of Northumberland, which wd be utterly impracticable. I shall not object, however, to confirming two days together at Newcastle, if it be really wanted. But more of this, when we meet. I will come prepared with a plan, or choice of plans, which I hope we may find feasible. I shall send this early tomorrow morning by a special messenger, to save time, and to ensure me an answer from you in the course of the day. Yours. I wish our meeting at Durham to be not later than Twelve, to give me time to return here to dinner. If Mr Griffith can accompany you that will be a good opportunity of making my acquaintance with him. There is sad strife between Mr Procter & Mr Housby about the curacy of Lesbury. Probably you will see one or both of them at Ryton tomorrow. (In a different hand) My desire, therefore is that you would immediately see Mr Thorp, the rector of Ryton, and request him from me to give you every information respecting yr curacy of Chillingham, that no time may be lost in giving Mr Proctor possession of ye house at Lesbury.”
Paper, 2f + 1f + wrapper
VML 8   16 October 1826
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“ I had a letter yesterday from Bishop Sandford stating that his son has just had the offer of a curacy in Bedfordshire, & requesting to know whether there is at present any immediate prospect of a curacy in this diocese, which should induce him to decline the offer made to him. Will you therefore be so good as to inform me of the particulars of the curacy you mentioned to me some time ago which you thought might possibly suit him; or of any other now vacant, or likely soon to become so? It were pity that he should remove so far as Bedfordshire, if any early vacancy were likely to arise in this neighbourhood. But his father intimates that he cannot well afford to remain unemployed, and his health being now somewhat re-established he is anxious to go forth. It appears, however, to be his intention to take one, or (at most) two pupils which, with his own increasing family, may require more accommodation for housekeeping than some curacies will supply. I shall write a few lines today to Bp Sandford, requesting that the matter be suspended for a few days, until I can report to him more decidedly upon it. The anniversary public examination of the Barrington school at this place is to take place on Wednesday, the day after tomorrow. If it should suit you to be present on the occasion, & to dine and sleep here, we shall be very glad of your company. The examination is to commence at Eleven o'clock. We hope to hear favourable accounts of Mrs Thorpe & her little one.”
Paper, 2f
VML 9   28 October 1826
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I inclose a letter which I recd this morning from Mr Williams of Crickhowel, whom it is proposed to ordain deacon upon the title of Mr Brandling's curacy of Castle Eden. It appears that all the parties are rather desirous of expediting the business; & as it is a good case, I have no objection to doing so. But I wish to avoid a private ordination; & it has occurred to me that possibly the affair might be managed ... Mr Williams letters di... to the bishop of St David's at his ensuing ordination. In that case, (if there be time to make the arrangement) Mr Williams might present himself to you at Abergwilly for examination, and upon your approval of him, the bishop would, I doubt not, have the kindness to admit him among his candidates. This would spare him a long journey hither, and probably affect his purpose more speedily than even if I were to give him a private ordination. Be so good as to let me know ... you think this either [impract]icable or in any respect objectionable; & I will then write to Mr Williams accordingly; whose letter I request you to return to me. I have written to bishop Sandford about the curacy of Ebchester and mentioned your kind offer of accommodation at Ryton in December, adding, however, that if he thought it necessary to come to an early determination, his son might perhaps make a journey by himself for the purpose of viewing it on the spot; &, having done so, come over to Auckland, & rest a day or two with us [before] his return. I have written al[so to the] vicar of Newcastle recommending the course which you and I agreed upon here. The archdeacon of Northumberland has just called upon me and entirely concurs with us in our view of the subject. Yours etc. Be so good as to mention on what day the bp of St Davids holds his ordination. If Mr Williams is to be ordained by him, it will be necessary that I shd apprize Mr Burder of it, that he may prepare the necessary papers. ”
Paper, 2f, damaged by damp, some text lost
VML 10   30 October 1826
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“Many thanks for your obliging letter. I have, in consequence, written to Mr Thos Williams, acquainting him that he may present himself to you at Abergwilly for Examination on either of the days you mention. I have written also to Mr Brandling for his nomination of Mr W. [and] Mr Burder to be prepared with the letter d[imissory] which, when I receive ... will forward to you ... Abergwilly, to be used at your discretion. I will also endeavour to write to the Bishop of St Davids, explaining my reasons for taking this liberty with him. But should I be prevented doing so, you will perhaps have the goodness to apologize for me. I have a letter from Bp Sandford this morning, in which he states that his son had written to you, requesting some particulars respect[ing] ... at Ebchester, to enable ... to decide upon the offer. [I presume] you will have received it today. If so, it is not improbable that his decision may be made before your return home. I shall direct this to Miss Thorp's at Durham, where I imagine it will find you tomorrow. Heartily wishing you a pleasant journey & safe return etc.”
Paper, 2f, damaged by damp, some text lost
VML 11   4 November 1826
Letter from WVM at Auckland Palace to CT
“I yesterday received Mr Brandling's nomination of Mr Thos Williams to be his sub-curate at Castle Eden & accordingly forward a Letter Dimissory to the Bishop of St Davids, which, if you find Mr Williams passes a satisfactory examination, you will have the goodness to make use of with the Bishop in his behalf. I wrote two or three days ago to the Bishop, to apprize him of my intention to take this liberty. Be so good as again to present my best regards to his Lordship etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 12    28 December 1826
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“Not knowing where Mr Housby now resides, I beg to trouble you with the inclosed, which contains a cheque from Mr Faber for £20, which you will much oblige me by forwarding to him at the first convenient opportunity. Mr Faber has, I believe, explained to him that I send it as a portion of the late Bishop's Benefaction. Mr John Sandford arrived here yesterday by good day-light, & stays with us till this evening. I am much pleased with him, & do not doubt that his residence in this Diocese will prove satisfactory. I shall rely upon your kind offices in advising & helping him on his first establishment at Ebchester, & when every thing is arranged for his entering upon the duty, the requisite measures will be taken for having him duly licensed. I shall be glad, at your leisure, to hear further from you respecting “a fund for reward books for the Sunday Schools”. If you have anything to suggest in which I can be of use in that respect, I will give it immediate attention. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
1827
VML 13   4 January 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“The family from Brancepeth Castle are to dine here on Thursday next, the 11th instant, & if you can do us the favour of joining the party, it will give us great pleasure. It will also be an additional kindness if you can make it convenient to stay over the Sunday, & benefit us by your assistance in the Chapel. But this shall be quite at your option. Mr Plumer left us this morning, & I fear will have a rough journey. If we may venture to hope for Mrs Thorp's company also, it will give us much pleasure. Yours etc.”
Paper, 1f
VML 14   9 January 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“The intelligence of the Duke of York's death has induced me to request Mr Russell & his friends from Brancepeth Castle to put off their intended visit to us to Monday next, the 15th instant, instead of Thursday in this week; (I hope it will be equally (cancelled)) to which he has most readily assented. We hope it will be equally convenient to you, to meet them o[n tha]t day: & as, in consequence of this postponement, the party from Brancepeth will now be reduced in number, we shall be able, with perfect convenience, to receive Mrs Thorp as well as yourself, without quartering you on Mr Faber. It will give us much pleasure if you can both come to us on Saturday, & stay till after our party on Monday. Yours etc.”
Paper, 1f
VML 15-16   18 January 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton, enclosing the following
“I enclose a Copy of a letter which I received yesterday from Mr Wrightson of Cusworth near Doncaster, respecting the Chapel at Mickley, & of my answer to it. I think that you & the other Commissaries ought to be apprized of the circumstances Mr Wrightson has mentioned. How it has happened that the Bounty Board has never been certified of the Endowment or Consecration of the Chapel, I cannot conceive. But it will be necessary to inquire of Mr Burrell, in order to ascertain to whom the omission is imputable. I will endeavour to do this whilst I am here; but should an opportunity offer, it might be well if you would also make the inquiry, at your perfect convenience. I hope you & Mrs Charles Thorp got home well on Tuesday. Miss Douglas left us yesterday. We are now preparing to send off our household in detachments before we take wing ourselves, which I think will be about the 29th of this month. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 17   14 January 1827
Copy letter from W.B. Wrightson at Cusworth to WVM
“I understand that the Bounty Board has lately sent down to your Lordship a Commission of inquiry relative to the Chapel at Mickley in the parish of Ovingham, Co of Northumberland. There are circumstances connected with this subject, which I am desirous of explaining to your Lordship, & I think it so happens that I can furnish you with the necessary information more easily than perhaps any other individual. The parish of Ovingham being of very considerable extent, & divided into two parts by the River Tyne, has the parish Church on the north side, & it has long been matter of complaint among the Townships (7 in number I believe) on the Southern side, that they are shut out by distance, & not only that, but there being no bridge, the fords & ferries are often dangerous, often impassable, & always expensive. Having some property at Mickley, I was very desirous that a Chapel should be built there, it being a central situation, & the inhabitants being warmly attached to the Ch of England. The work was begun about five years ago at my expense. After it was finished, I must candidly inform your Lordship that difficulties were interposed from quarters where I thought I had a right to expect nothing but facilities. Mr Birkitt, the minister of the parish applied for a license to do duty in it, in the interval before it could be consecrated; having very kindly agreed to accept from me a very trifling stipend for his trouble. This was refused, & the consequence was that it stood useless & unoccupied for nearly two years. After that another difficulty arose, the late Bishop was advised not to allow it to be consecrated unless I would endow it with £100 a year in land. This was perfectly out of the question; but the demand was so long persevered in, that I had almost determined to give up the chapel to the Dissenters, when the Bishop consented to allow the consecration upon £100 being invested as an endowment in the 3 per cent consols. The Trustees of Lord Crewe's charity agreed to give £200 to meet the £300 usually given by the Governors of Q. Anne's Bounty; & thus we proposed to make up a trifling income of 23 or 24 pounds a year; & to have service in the chapel once a fortnight. In September 1824, the consecration took place, & a certificate to that effect was sent up by Mr Burrell to the Bounty Office, or their solicitor. The Trustees of Ld Crewe's charity paid their £200 to the Bounty Office, & under the faith that all was right, Mr Birkett, & his Son, one of the most superior young men, I am sure, in his profession, undertook the duty - the attendance has always been very numerous, & the country people were highly satisified. Mr Birkett, whose circumstance are very moderate, made application from time to time for what he conceived was due from the Bounty Office - but he very lately received for answer from Mr Paterson;- “Your Chapel has no claim, either from royal bounty, or parliamentary grant - it has no endowment, nor has it ever been certified that it has been consecrated.” I immediately wrote to Mr Chr Hodgson, stating the great mistake that they laboured under - & the consequence has been the commission now sent down to your Lordship. What the consequences of this will be I do not know, but I do hope & trust that they will make their arrangement retrospective from the time of the consecration, because otherwsie Mr B. has been doing this duty for two years & an half for nothing. The deed of endowment was registered at Durham in Sepr 1824, & every thing done as we thought quite regularly. I consider the business as now quite out of my hands; but I shall be happy to furnish your Lordship with any information in my power; & I hope you will have the kindess to represent it in such a manner to the Bounty Board as will prevent the grievous hardship that will otherwise fall upon Mr Birkett & his son. Yours etc.”
Copy reply of WVM to W.B. Wrightson esq at Cusworth of 17 January 1827.
“I recd your letter this morning, & beg to assure you that the circumstances stated in it respecting the chapel at Mickle, (of which I was not before aware) shall be immediately attended to. The commission of inquiry was forwarded by me yesterday to Mr Birkitt; & I will take care that the Commrs shall be put in possession of your letter, or a copy of it, for their information. What can have occasioned the mistake you mention, I am at present unable to conjecture: but investigation shall be made. Probably I shall be in London before the Commrs can have made their report; & whenever the matter comes before the Governors of Q. Anne's Bounty, I hope to be able to attend the Board, & give it every assistance in my power. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 18   5 March 1827
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“I thank you for your letter, & the copy of the petition you had drawn up, which I like exceedingly, & very much wish it may be adopted, feeling quite confident that the whole strength of the Chapter cannot produce a better. It embraces all the strong points of the question, expressed with force & perspicacity, yet temperate & modest. The petition from the Archdeaconry of Northumberland I have just received, & shall take an early opportunity of presenting it. It is signed by 80 names, out of 83 parishes, which are more than might have been expected at this inconvenient season of the year. I see by the Durham paper this morning, that the business of the County address of condolence went off very well. I presume you were present. I intend to put Mr Bulmer aside as civilly & tenderly as I can. Unless I hold the reins pretty tightly in the outset, I should soon find my new regulation completely upset. It gives me pleasure to find that matters at the Castle have given satisfaction. A letter from Mr Faber this morning confirms your report in this respect. Our weather here is very changeable. We have had two or three days unseasonably warm - but now it is again chilly. It is weather that does not suit my habit, nor Mrs Van Mildert's, but we are both getting better. I assisted yesterday at the consecration of Dr [Charles] Lloyd [as bishop of Oxford] - & I need not say with what great satisfaction. Whether I shall be requested to do the same for Dr [Robert] Gray [as bishop of Bristol], I do not yet know. He seems to be gratified with his promotion. Yours etc. Again let me thank you for doing the ecclesiastical honours at the Castle.”
Paper, 2f
VML 19   10 May 1827
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT [at 20 Dover St, London] enclosing the following
“I enclose a letter just recd from Mr Sparks Byers (no longer present), & my answer to it, by which you will see I have requested him to call on you & explain the matter. I have taken this liberty with you, being so hoarse that I can hold no conversation with anyone, & also not being ? desirous of any more communication with Mr Byers. When you have heard what he has to say, I think it may be as well to grant him a bene discessit & have done with him. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 20   10 May 1827
Copy letter from WVM at Hanover Square to Revd Sparks Byers
“I am too much indisposed today to see anyone upon business - nor can I be sure of seeing you tomorrow. But if you will call on the Revd Mr Thorp who is now in town at No 20 Dover Street & explain the matter to him, he will communicate with me upon it. I had heard lately with much surprise of your having entirely absented yourself from the Curacy of Warkworth since you were ordained upon it. You cannot but recollect my reluctance in accepting your nomination to it, under circumstances which appeared to me far from satisfactory: & you ought not to have made such an engagement without first ascertaining that you could find a place of residence. I shall not object however to your relinquishing the Curacy - more especially since it is evident that Mr Winscomb has found it practical so long to dispense with your services, & as I certainly should not consent to admit you, upon that title, to Priest's Orders. You need not trouble yourself to continue in town on this business, after you have seen Mr Thorp, & conferred with him upon it. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 21   [?c.June 1827]
Letter [from WVM to CT]
(part only) “Mr Thurlow will preach at Durham - Mr Vernor at Alnwick - Mr Eden at Morpeth - Dr Phillpott at Auckland. From Archdn Snigleton I have no answer - nor from Mr D'Arcy Haggitt, to whom by mistake I wrote instead of to Mr Haigh of Wooler, having mislaid the memorandum which I have now found & ... I find ... fix upon Mr Haigh. Does Mr D'Arcy Haggitt reside at Cornhill? I direct to him there & trust will again or else put ... to Mr Haigh. A letter from you ...Friday...”
Paper, 1f, faded and stained
VML 22   14 June 1827
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton
“I thank you for your letter - but am sorry to find that you were kept back from home by the apprehension of Measles. It occurs to me that under such circumstances you had better relinquish your kind intention of receiving me at Ryton on the 7th & 8th of July, & let me postpone my visit till my return on the 21st - when if your house should be perfectly free from any such malady, I may partake of your hospitality without apprehension - for, to say the truth, I am not quite sure that I have had the measles myself, & wd rather avoid the risk. Nor should I be put to any great inconvenience by the change of plan; Mr Collinson of Gateshead having offered me accommodation at his house - which I had only declined as being pre-engaged to you. In that case, however, I submit whether it may not be advisable to put off the Confirmation at Ryton either to Monday the 23rd of July, or entirely till next year. This might also enable me to attempt confirmation at Elsdon, which (as you will see by the letter I inclose (not now present)) the Archdeacon much importunes me to do. I will postpone writing to him till I hear from you. But I rather incline to decline going at all to Elsdon this year, & to hold out the expectation of making an express journey next year for confirming at Elsdon & also at Haltwhistle, & any other place in that direction, where it may be wanted. As I shall not set out from here till the middle of the day on Tuesday next, there will be time for me to receive your answer before I start if you should be able to write to me on Saturday or Sunday, I shall venture to direct this to Ryton, though uncertain whether you may be yet returned thither. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 23    19 June 1827
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“I thank you for the letter I recd from you this morning. You may be assured I have no wish to disturb the arrangement already made, attended, as it now promises to be, with no inconvenience to either of us. Mr Baker, however, has interposed a proposal for taking me in after my confirmation at North Shields, by which he says I might be spared a long circuitous route from thence on the 21st of July, viz by crossing over to South Shields, sending round my carriage to meet me there, & thence proceeding instanter to Whitburn, & sojourning there till I go to Wearmouth. All this he undertakes to demonstrate to your satisfaction, when we all meet at Durham for the Visitation: & till then I am willing to leave the matter open for your consideration, which will be quite soon enough for any final arrangement. At Ryton, however, I still hold to my purpose of confirming on Monday the 9th & proceeding thence to Hexham. To Archdeacon Singleton I have written to say that I cannot now include Elsdon in my route, but will reserve it for some separate excursion, either in the Autumn of this year, or (more probably) the Summer of the next, when I may hope to find the Chapels at Haltwhistle & Edlingham ready for Consecration. With this I hope he will be satisfied. I do not ask you to come to me whilst I am at Auckland. At present I have scarcely made even a step towards preparation for my Visitation nor can I possibly do it during my stay in London. Tomorrow we hope to start for Auckland, & the interval of a bare week will be little enough for what I have to do. I shall therefore close my doors against all Visitors, & have even prohibited my chaplain from coming to me till the end of next week. But I look forward with hope & pleasure to meeting you at Durham, where I purpose taking up my quarters on Monday Evening, the 2nd of July, preparatory to the commencement of my labours on the day following. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 24   24 June 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I thank you for both your letters, & (what is rather unusual with me) steal a few minutes from Sunday to acknowledge them. I thankfully accept Mr Clarke's proffered hospitality at Benton House, & shall be obliged to you if you will communicate this to him, with my best compliments. It gives me also pleasure to adhere to my first intention of enjoying a quiet Sunday at Ryton on the 8th of July. But respecting the 22nd of July, as you obligingly leave that open for re-consideration, I am inclined to think that Mr Baker's offer will, upon the whole, be the most convenient, & spare me some additional fatigue. And I am the more disposed to it, as it will afford me an opportunity of confirming on the 23rd at Sunderland, which (from all I can learn) is very desirable. After consecrating Ryhope Chapel on the 24th, I am to go on to Castle Eden, & take up my quarters with Mr Burdon on my way to Hartlepool. Finding also from Mr Brewster of Egglescliffe, that much anxiety is expressed that I shd confirm again at Stockton for the accommodation of the neighbouring parishes, as well as of the town itself, I have promised to appropriate Thursday the 26th to a confirmation there, & to take Sedgefield on the day following, on my way home. This will only add one day to my labours, & I shall also have the gratification of visiting good Mr Brewster, after my confirmation at Hartlepool, & sleeping at his house that evening. Archdeacon Singleton promises to preach at Newcastle. From Mr Haggitt I have no answer, & have therefore written to Mr Watkins. I shall also write to Mr Haggitt, to let him know that his services will not (I hope) be wanted. I reckon upon seeing you at Durham Castle on Monday Evening - intending to drink Tea there, after an early dinner here, & shall be glad if you will join our party there between 7 & 8. We arrived here safe & well to dinner on Friday, after a pleasant & very expeditious journey. Yours etc”.
Paper, 2f
VML 25    25 June 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I believe I omitted noticing, in my letter yesterday, what you had intimated respecting my laying the first stone of Winlayton Chapel. It will give me great pleasure to do so, if you can suggest any practicable plan, without breaking in upon arrangements already made. I know not how the chapel is situated with reference to my journey to Hexham, or its distance from Ryton, so as to enable me to perform that ceremony after confirming at your Church, & yet reach Hexham that evening. It would not, I apprehend, be a very fatiguing ceremony & if the distance from Ryton to Hexham be no greater than I can conveniently travel in the evening, after an early meal with you, you may command as much service for the Monday morning as you think feasible. At present I have fixed to confirm at Sunderland on Monday the 23rd, which will preclude me from my intended second visit to Ryton at that time - otherwise I might have taken Winlaton chapel then, before going to Whitburn. But probably you will think with me, that the duty at Sunderland is the most urgent. You will understand, however, that I am ready to adopt any suggestion of your's, well knowing that you will be quite as considerate as myself in determining quid valeat humeri. Yours etc. ”
“Am I still right in directing to you at York? I have an invitation from Sir David Wm Smith of Alnwick to take up my quarters at his house there on my Visitation. Are you acquainted with him? As the Duke will not be at the Castle, this offer may perhaps be acceptable & I might give up ? by refusing it. Let me have your opinion, though perhaps I may accept it before I hear from you. Wm.”
“Mr Burdon presses me to sleep at Castle Eden, as well as dine there on the Eveg before I confirm at Hartlepool & says that I shall find it an easy drive in the morning to Hartlepool & moreover, that there is no good accommodation at the latter place.”
Paper, 2f
VML 26-27   27 June 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“I thank you for your obliging & satisfactory letter just come to hand, & trust you will excuse me still troubling you for a little further information on some minor points which, as a novice in the See, I am not thoroughly acquainted with, nor can Mr Faber set me right, no Visitation having occurred since he became officiall, connected with the late Bishop.”
“In the first place, ought I to enter Durham with Six Horses to my Carriage? - & must the same state be observed at Newcastle or elsewhere? I would rather dispense with such parade, if the omission will not create observation.”
“In the next place, should I not invite the Dean & the Prebendaries in residence to my Visitation dinner? - & can you give me an idea of how many the party is likely to consist? - On the next day also (Wednesday) do I invite the same number of Clergy to dine with me after the confirmation, as on the preceding day - or, if not, what line is to be drawn? I wish to do everything of this kind to the full as handsomely as heretofore but not to introduce unusual or unnecessary compliments.”
“I have written to the Mayor of Newcastle, to say that on Friday, the day of my Visitation there, I must entertain the Clergy, (I believe) at the Assembly Room - & to request the Company of himself & the Corporation to meet them. I presume this is right & usual. But from what Archdn Singleton intimates in a letter from him yesterday, it appears that the Mayor had invited a party to meet me at the Mansion House on Friday. I hope my letter will set him right on that point, & induce him to have his party on the day preceding. I shall easily arrive in good dinner time after the Confirmation at Chester-le-Street.”
“I have accepted [Sir David Wm] Smith's invitation, & also Mr Burdon's at Castle Eden, Mr Vernon's at Hutton Tower, Mr ?Ekin's at Morpeth & Mr Brewster's at Egglescliffe. You I presume have made my compliments for me to Mr Clarke at Benton House.”
“At Wooler, Mr Haigh has offered to bespeak accommodation for me at the Tankerville Arms; & I suppose it will be requisite to bespeak the same at the principal Inns at Hexham & Berwick. These, with the exception of Sedgefield, will be the only places where I shall not be in private quarters.”
“I shall depend on seeing you on Monday Evening at Durham Castle, when these & other such matters may be talked over. Yours etc.”
Paper, 4f
VML 28   29 June 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“Your letter this morning relieves me from several perplexities.”
“I shall travel much more to my own comfort & satisfaction with only 4 horses, & it will be a great convenience to leave a pair at home for Mrs Van Mildert's use.”
“My Cook goes to Durham today to commence preparations; my steward & housekeeper follow tomorrow, & directions are given to calculate on 40 or 50 to dinner on Tuesday. I suppose half that number will be as many as we may expect on Wednesday.”
“I shd dread the repletion of two dinners on Friday at Newcastle. But the Mayor has relieved me from any such apprehensions. He accepts my invitation to meet my Clergy on Friday, & has his party at the Mansion House on Thursday, which will suit exceedingly well after confirming at Chester. He wishes me to stay at Newcastle till Monday, or, at all events, to take a private dinner with him on Saturday, before I take my departure. But I have written today to say that I had arranged to go to Ryton immediately after the Confirmation & therefore cd only take some slight refreshment with him before I set out. I presume this will best accord with your wishes as well as my own. A cool & quiet meal at Ryton will be a luxury far beyond all the temptations of the Mansion House.”
“Respecting Hexham I am doubtful - but still think I had better sleep there the night before the Confirmation. The distance is not only more than I shd like in the morning before duty - but the journey I shall have to make afterwards to Rothbury, 31 miles, is even more than enough for one day's performance. But perhaps it will be time enough to determine this when we meet at Durham.”
“Mr Watkins is too ill to preach at Berwick; & I have written to Mr Haigh. If he declines, I shall write to the Vicar of Berwick - or if at last I find myself distressed, I shall perhaps ask the Archdeacon to deliver at Berwick what he had before preached at Newcastle.”
“If you know how to give a hint to the parishes eastward of Newcastle to transfer their catechumens to North Shields, I think it wd be a very good arrangement. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 29   25 October 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton.
“I thank you for your obliging communication.”
“Mr Griffith views the matter too much in the dry manner of a professional man. But there are good reasons why it should be taken up as a concern in which the reputation of our order is clearly at stake; & whatever may be the result, good will be done by showing that there is no disposition on the part of the Church to screen its minister from any merited censure. I therefore entirely approve of your intention to call for the churchwarden, & put the matter in train for being brought to an issue. Perhaps, when you have so done, you will not think it amiss to communicate with the Chancellor of the Diocese, & revive his attention to the business.”
“For your suggestion to the promoters of the compliment in contemplation to your late Diocesan, I am also much obliged to you. It may prevent my being placed in rather a delicate predicament, but should the matter be brought before me, I shall of course be ready to give it support, whatever may be my private opinion of its expediency.”
“We are invited to Ravensworth Castle for Tuesday next, & to be present at the Musical Performance on Wednesday at Gateshead. Probably we shall meet you there.”
“Dr Wellesley & his family have been passing 2 or 3 days here, & leave us tomorrow. Mr Strong is called away to London & sets out today. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 30   10 November 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“I received information yesterday of the death of Dr Thomas of Chillingham; & have, in consequence, offered the Living to Mr Sandford. I think he will hardly hesitate in accepting it; but I have desired him, in case he wishes to know more particulars than I can give him, to confer with you upon it. In the event of his accepting it, the Curacy of Ebchester will be disposable, &, (if I am not mistaken) by Dr Thomas's death the Living of Kirknewton comes to Mr Robinson, the Curate of Merrington, which may make another opening for one of our unemployed Curates. Do you think Mr Dobson a fit person for either of these or Mr Housby? I have also one or two more on my list of those who have lately applied for employment of that kind. Perhaps you will turn the matter in your thoughts, & give me the benefit of your opinion when we have the pleasure of seeing you here on Tuesday. We hope you will stay with us till Friday.”
“Three ap[plicat]ions have come to me tdoay for Chillingham - & probably I shall have more. But I think you will agree with me that it is a very suitable thing for Sandford - & I am anxious to do something for him as early as may be, for the sake of old friendship for his Father, as well as a sort of tie in his being my Godson. I believe too that he is well worthy of it. Yours etc.”
“We rejoice to hear such good accts of Mrs Chas Thorp & the young one.”
“I had a letter [lost] ...tood ago from Mr Knox solicitor [lost] of Cornhill, vacant by the death [of Mr] Ebdele. You are aware probably that [Mr] Darnell has removed Mr Knox from Norham. Mr Knox has also been writing to Bp Sandford who, he says, has advised him to apply to me. Do you think he is fit for either of the vacant curacies? If you shd happen to see Mr Darnell on your way through Durham on Tuesday, perhaps you wd confer with him on this point.”
“Mr Ireland of Blanchland is also crying out for a curacy, on being removed by Mr Harrison.”
“Mr S.S. Wood (late from Canada) had actually sent me Dr Thomas's nomination to the Curacy of Chillingham a few days ago but I had fortunately taken no steps toward carrying it into effect.”
Paper, 2f
VML 31-32   25 November 1827
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT enclosing the following.
“I thank you for the letter you sent me by Mr Plumer which I forwarded the next day to Mr Norris. Today's Post has brought me another from him this morning, which he desires me to direct to you. Though I have read it, I do not understand it. But I presume that you will know what it means.”
“We are preparing to start on Tuesday, & hope to reach Mongewell on Friday or Staurday. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 33   23 November 1827
Letter from H.H. Norris at Grove St to [WVM].
“I very much want to know the names of the persons who passed on the conveyance of the quondam R.C. Jesuit Chapel and as you say that you can easily have access to the deeds I should feel much obliged to you to furnish me with them with as little delay as your convenience will admit of. I should like if it were possible to obtain the names of the ?protestants in whom the property was vested for a fear of the successions. Excuse the simple statement of wants written in great haste etc.”
Paper, 2f
1828
VML 34-36   5 January 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongewell to CT at Ryton.
“I recd the inclosed letter a day or two ago from Mr S.S. Wood (no longer present) & with it a letter to him from the Abp of York”, of which the following is a copy:
“Rev Sir, I shall most willingly sanction your being employed professionally in the Diocese of Durham or in any part of the Province of York: but I doubt much whether the Bp of Durham will consent to your performing the duties of two churches for a stipend of £30 pr annum. Yours etc. P.S. If the Bp of Durham shd make no objection on the ground I have mentioned or a more formal sanction shd be required I shall be ready to countersign any License the Bp may grant to you. I conclude you will show his Lordship the Letter.”
“All this is mighty ignorant & foolish on the part of Mr Wood; & I have written to him to let him know that it was unnecessary & improper to apply to the Abp for any thing more than a general recognition of his admissibility to officiate in the Church of Engd in order to screen him for the penalties of the Act of Palt - but that as to his license to the Curacy & the stipend to be allotted to him, the matter rested wholly with myself; & that I shd take some time to consider of it. You will, I think, agree with me, that it is necessary to have it understood that I cannot allow any interference of this kind in my Diocese. Were I to do so, I shd not only surrender any peculiar rights or privileges of the Palatinate See, but even those ordinary Diocesan rights which every bishop enjoys independent of Archiepiscopal authority.”
“My motive, however, for troubling you in the affair is that I may obtain some satisfactory intelligence as to this Mr Wood's real views & conduct. I have no Testimonials from him of any kind & can have none of the usual description; though I have no reason to suspect any thing wrong in him, & I understand he brings with him, or could procure, a good report from the Dn & Clergy of Quebec [Canada], in which province he was a missionary, but has now resigned his Mission, in order to remove the first objection I took to admitting him to a Cure in this country. I think you told me that he was well received at Newcastle - & Mr Sandford seemed desirous that he shd be placed at Ebchester, as a person likely to suit the people there. But after what has passed, I am by no means inclined implicitly to receive any recommendation of ?Industry &, if I mistake not, Mr Wood was one of the orators at Newcastle, at the same time with Sandford; which bringing to my recollection the old adage, “birds of a feather”, does not tend to give me much confidence in him. In short, I need not conceal from you my apprehensions, that Mr Wood may be a candidate for that sort of popularity, of which I am most mistrustful, & which I certainly feel it my duty to discountenance; nor do I like to be the first Bishop to make an experiment of this kind with a person so entirely a stranger & who may be seeking an opportunity to ?figure away, under my auspices.”
“There will be no necessity, however, for my putting forward any reasons of this kind as the ground of my rejection (if I shd reject him) & therefore I confide this to you in private. It will be sufficient as an ostensible reason that I can have no regular testimonials in this case, & therefore must decline admitting him. If other Bishops chose to be more facile, be it so. But I do not conceive I can incur any just blame, by acting in such a matter simply on my own discretion.”
“As my magnus Apollo, be so good as to indulge me with your views of the whole case, accompanied with any information you have which may throw new light upon it. Yours etc.”
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 37    9 January 1828
Letter from [CT] to [WVM].
Faded, incomplete.
Paper, 2f
VML 38-39   12 January 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongewell to CT at Ryton.
“I have just received your letter, & am much obliged to you for the trouble you have taken in lecturing Mr Sandford. The same post has brought me a letter from him, written in a good & proper feeling, & strongly expressive of his concern for what has passed, intimating that immediately after he had delivered his sentiments at the meeting, he was conscious of its indiscretion, that his being at the meeting was purely accidental, & the whole resulted from more inadvertency & inconsideration etc etc.”
“I am very glad that you opened the matter to him so freely, & I have little doubt that an impression has been made upon him, which may hereafter incline him to keep out of the way of such incitements as may throw him off his guard. Nothing can be more unassuming, or more candid, than the whole strain of his letter. In the course of a few days, I shall probably write to him, & while I shall readily relieve him from the distress he appears to labour under, it may not be amiss to throw in a few words of advice, on which he may at his leisure ruminate.”
“Poor Mr Crosthwaite's Letter is sadly distressing - & Mr Scott's case, I fear, is hardly better. I have written to Mr Faber desiring him to remit to you out of Bp Barrington's Fund the sum of Forty pounds; & I shall be much obliged if you will take the trouble of sending to Mr Crosthwaite & Mr Scott, £20 each, as soon as you conveniently can. My reason for making you my Almoner, is, that I do not know whether Mr Scott is actually at Newcastle, & that Mr Crosthwaite will perhaps like better that it shd pass through your hands, than be sent to him through Mr Faber.”
“I purpose going up to London on Monday the 21st for the meeting of Parliament, & especially for the purpose of voting for Ld Shaftesbury's re-election as Chairman of the Committees - an ?appointee having been intended to him, in favor of Ld Auckland, the worthy Head of the London University! Possibly, however, that may now be given up - another change of Ministry being on the tapis - & one which, I trust, holds out better prospects - I do not intend staying there more than 3 or 4 days - & Mrs V.M. will remain here.”
“Our weather is very variable, but we have suffered no harm. Yours etc.”
“I suppose I may keep Mr Crosthwaite's letter.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 40-41   13 January 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongewell to CT at Ryton.
“Your letter recd this morning inclines me to accept the nomination of Mr Wood to the Curacies of Ebcester & Medomsley. I believe that I have already mentioned that I purpose going to town on Monday the 21st instant, & to stay there 3 or 4 days. I shall then see Mr Burder, & will confer with him as to the best mode of obtaining the Archbishop's releasing Mr Wood from his inadmissibility. That being done, I am disposed to relax on other points, & let the matter takes its course. But Mr Burder will write to Mr Wood, when things are more ripe.”
“If you are prepared with your project on the subject of Easter offerings, you will perhaps let me have it whilst I am in London next week. If not, I suppose a more advanced kind of the ? will be in good time.”
“We seem to be in a fact way of having a Ministry somewhat more in accordance with our sentiments than that which is now dissolving. It is an ?anxious crisis. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 42    19 January 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongewell to CT.
“Your letter of the 11th respecting Mr Sandford gave me much pleasure. His letter to me was no less satisfying & I have since written to relieve his mind from the burthen which evidently suppressed him, subjoining, however, a few friendly hints, which I hope may not be unserviceable. I have good hopes that no further cause of dissatisfaction may arise, & when he is once settled at Chillingham, somewhat out of the vortex of Newcastle, all may go on smoothly & quietly.”
“I have at last printed my Charge. It issues from the Clarendon Press & Parker has orders to send one hundred copies to each of my Archdeacons, for distribution among the Clergy of their respective Districts. In my letter to Archdn Prosser, I have ventured to say that though I send them to him officially, & as a point of etiquette, yet I am sure that you will willingly disburthen him of the trouble of distribution, if he will send the greater number or the whole of them to Ryton. Should he do so, you will oblige me by sending them round, quite at your leisure & convenience, to their proper destinations, & if you know any of the Laity, to whom such a thing may be acceptable, some few of them may be so disposed of, reserving of course, to yourself, one which you will keep for my sake & more, if you wish them, for any private friends. And should the number sent out not suffice, an additional supply shall be forwarded. I reckon the packet may reach Durham in the course of next week.”
“The whole of the quarto impression is destined for presents. An octavo impression is working off for the booksellers”.
“Being pressed for time, & this being the chief purpose of my writing, yours etc.”
“The further prorogation of Parlt keep me here till the 28th when the Bp of Oxford accompanies me to London for a few days.”
“The political horizon presents an encouraging aspect. Still I am anxious.”
Paper, 2f
VML 43-44   11 February 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongewell to CT at Ryton.
“I believe I owe you acknowledgements for your former letter, respecting Easter offerings, as well as for that I recd from you a day or two ago.”
“Of the former I will only say at present that, as soon as an opportunity offers, I shall talk over the matter with some of my Episcopal brethren & others whose opinions may be desirable, & will acquaint you with the result. Some such measure certainly seems wanted, for better adapting the rights of the Clergy to the habits & feelings of the present day. But whether the proposition may not awaken a hostile disposition towards the Church, will deserve consideration.”
“I have forwarded the depositions in Mr Waite's case to Mr Baker, whom I have some expectation of seeing here today. In that case, we may talk over the affair, & I will write to you again. There can be no doubt now of sufficient evidence to convict, but in what way to proceed, I am not of myself competent to decide.”
“Many thanks for your readiness to distribute the copies of my Charge. A dozen more shall be sent to you, as soon as I can give the necessary directions. I rather think that Rivington had orders to send one for Lord Ravensworth to his residence in town. But whether it be so or not, you will oblige me by presenting one at Ravensworth Castle “from the Author”, which perhaps Lady Ravensworth will do me the honor to accept, as she condescended to accept my other productions. ”
“I was gratified by attending in the H of Lords, on the opening of Parliament. Every thing went off well, & the Duke [of Wellington] acquitted himself with great Propriety. How soon I may go up again must depend on circumstances. Some warm work will probably occur in the course of the Sessions, & I shall hold it a duty to be ready to support the Government. Then, too, the Unitarian Marriage Bill, the Repeal of the Test Laws, & the Catholic Claims, are matters on which our Bench will hardly be permitted to slumber.”
“We have a deep fall of snow today. Till within these few days, the weather was more like May than February. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 45   15 February 1828
To CT at Ryton.
Paper wrapper
VML 46   22 March 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongwell to [CT] .
“I fear I must have greatly annoyed you by my recent letters during the domestic anxiety you have lately undergone, & of which if I had been aware, I wd have spared you so much additional trouble. I am, however, the more obliged to you for your attention to my concerns, under such circumstances; & I rejoice that you are at last, under a kind Providence so well relieved from parental anxieties & fears.”
“Your report of Mr G. Wood is very satisfactory & has induced me to let him know that, though I do not approve of ordaining him upon the Lectureship, I shall not object to receiving the Curacy as a title, with an understanding that he may afterwards relinquish it, if it is found incompatible with the Lectureship.”
“Whenever Mr Rawes removes from Stamfordham, I shall be very glad if you can secure the Curacy for poor Dobson, or any other unemployed clergyman, whom you may think more fit for it, or more in need of it. Mr Thurlow wd no doubt attend to any recommendation from you. I fear, however, that it is rather a weighty concern & may require a more efficient person than some of those whom we may wish to favour.”
“Mr Allason of Heddon on the Wall has just sent me the papers of a young man, Mr Fletcher Woodhouse, B.A. Queens Coll: Oxford, whom he proposes to nominate to his Curacy as a Title for Deacon's Orders. I do not know why he wants a Curate; but as he is resident himself & can only want an Assistant, it seems as if this might be a fair opportunity of recommending him to take some such person as Mr Dobson or Mr Housby, in preference to making another addition to our stock of clergy. Can you tell whether it is likely that he wd take such advice? Probably I may make the experiment. He presses me to expedite Mr Woodhouse's proceeding so as to have him ordained, with letters dimissory, at Easter. But this seems hardly practicable. If I sd consent, it will be necessary, perhaps, to trouble you to examine him, that he may be spared a journey to the South, unless he be already in the South, of which I know not at present. Yours etc.”
“What think you of the new Dean of Chester? He breakfasted with me on Wednesday at Hanover Square, & seems in high glee, at the very gracious manner in which this compliment has been paid to him. His Book, too, is just come out.”
Paper, 2f
VML 47   31 March 1828
Letter from WVM at Mongewell to CT.
“I thank you for both your obliging letters.”
“I have written to Mr Allason, desiring to know why he wishes to have a curate, & recommending if one be really necessary, either Mr Dobson or Mr Housby. The matter is thus postponed, at least - & perhaps, on his part, will be given up. I shall, at all events, unless he can show some special urgency, not admit a new candidate for orders upon such a title, until my own next Ordination, which will give abundant time for inquiring & consideration.”
“Mr Ireland's application I do not now intend to notice. I find, too, from a letter Mr Burnell has written to me, that Mr Jackson the Sub-Curate of Wallsend, it is hoped may recover & resume his duty; & that the duty of the parish is in the meantime duly provided for. But I will confer with Mr Durell.”
“The King's Levee last week again called me to town. From what I could collect in conversation with some of my brethren on the Bench & other friends of the Church, there seems to be a feeling of some degree of satisfaction in the proposed conditional repeal of the Test Laws but not unmixed with apprehensions of some ulterior measures herafter. I believe we are doing wisely in bending thus far - but I am not without misgivings similar to your own. What I chiefly dread are the indications, not too manifest, of a tendency to Liberalism where it was least to be apprehended, not only in this but on other points. I trust, nevertheless, that we are in better hands than our own.”
“The new Dean of Chester looks smiling & gay.”
“We rejoice to hear improved news of your household, yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 48-49   5 May 1828
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton.
“I thank you for both your letters, which give me good hope that, under the Divine blessing & with the advance of a more propitious season, you will ere long be restored to your friends & the public, who can ill spare such men as yourself in such times as these. But you must beware of the month of May & its treacherous smiles. Of maladies in the tracher I have had somewhat too much experience, & am now suffering slightly from the effect of a cold which usually attacks me in that quarter. My remedy, when the attack is serious, is a blister on the throat, which hitherto has never failed to carry off the grievance, in aid, however, of proper internal applications. But whether our cases are similar, I know not, & your Osculapius, I understand, is of well-known eminence as well as a personal friend of your own. Therefore I do not presume to prescribe.”
“It is a comfort to me to know that, under these circumstances, I had not molested you, by my unimportant commissions. It is of little moment whether the Newcastle Editor inserts the article one week or another. The Durham paper has given it, I see, at full length. I expect today to see in the “Mirror of Parliament” the report of what I said on Monday last, on the third reading of the Bill. Possibly, I may have some copies of it struck off, in the same way as the other, if my friends here shd think it desirable. My object in then speaking was to set myself right, if possible, with our most zealous friends (Ld Eldon & others) & to prevent my being identified with those promoters of the Bill (whether Laymen or Ecclesiastics) in whose sentiments I could not concur & I hope this purpose was, in some degree, attained. The good old Earl gratified me exceedingly by his kindness in replying: & it was no small satisfaction to have called forth from the Premier a frank assurance that he should encourage no ulterior views beyond this measure, if any such were entertained by the party. ”
“I rejoice to hear that the good work you have so much at heart at Winlaton goes on, so prosperously, & shall almost envy you your pleasurable sensations on the first sound of the Steeple Bells. You have my full permission to put up my arms in whatever part of the building you approve; & great satisfaction it will give me to be thus remembered as having had some share, however small, in such an undertaking.”
“In this, & another cover, I will fold up two or three copies of the speech - & to prevent their being over-weight, the blank page shall be torn off. Yours etc.”
Paper, 3f
VML 50-51   8 May 1828
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT.
“I have just received an application from Mr Fenwick & Mr Wardell, on the part of a Committee in your parish, respecting subscriptions for an organ in your Church, to which I shall be very glad to contribute, & will thank you to put my name down for twenty pounds, & to call upon Mr Faber for the payment of it as soon as you please.”
“I cannot but take an interest in any thing that may render still more complete one of the best regulated Churches & best performed services that it has been my good fortune to meet with & taking for granted that you & your parishioners are perfectly agreed on the point. I have pleasure in this opportunity of offering a small token of my regard for both.”
“Mrs Van Mildert & myself are laid up with severe colds, & are under Dr Latham's prescriptions, but somewhat better today than yesterday.”
“Archdn Prosser has just sent me word that he has a favourable bulletin of you today. I rejoice to hear it, yours etc”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 52   9 June 1828
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT.
“I was desirous of writing to you sooner, but have been prevented by an almost incessant pressure of business, which increases upon me the more as I am preparing to quit London as soon as possible for the North.”
“I am rejoiced to find that you are so well recovered as to change your quarters, & take the benefit of Harrogate waters. Should they suit your constitution as well as they have done mine, you will have good reason to be satisfied with the prescription. But I hope you will give them a fair trial, & not be in too much haste to resume your interesting & anxious occupations at Ryton. Such a re-instatement of health as I now confidently anticipate for you, will more than compensate the temporary suspension of your duties, & I trust that a gracious Providence will spare you yet many years for the good of the Church, as well as your family & friends.”
“I observed the death of poor Mr Crosthwaite in the papers. May not this make an opening for some good clergyman?”
“I hardly venture to make any definitive arrangements as to the time of consecrating your chapel of Winlaton, nor shd I choose to encounter it till the smell of Paint & Varnish be effectually gone off. But I anticipate much gratification in performing this office at the first convenient opportunity, & I will bear in mind your suggestion as to preaching on the occasion, subject, however, to further consideration. Be assured, I am well inclined to it, & to any thing which can add to your satisfaction, & that of your flock.”
“Other Diocesan matters must stand over till I reach Auckland, which I intended to do next week - but I believe now we shall hardly set out before the first of July.”
“You will be grieved to hear that Baron Hullock lies dangerously ill. The night before last he was in extreme danger. Yesterday the fever had somewhat abated. I have not yet received today's report.”
“You will have seen with ? down the R.C. with a good ? The second night's debate was very capital. The Duke of [?W] spoke admirably & with great statesmanlike effect. He is to preside on Saturday at a meeting to be held for setting on foot a London College upon Ch of Engd principles for the success of which we are all very anxious. It has the ? Sanction. The inclosed prospect of it may interest you. I wait in town to attend the meeting, & in the Eveg go down to Mongewell where Mrs V.M. still is, & after passing 3 or 4 days there, we both come up to town to pack up & set out for Auckland. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 53   Saturday [?c.July 1828]
Letter from WVM [to CT]
“I thank you for your letter & the newspaper. My Standard had given much the same report, in substance, as the Courier. Pr Peel had better not have committed himself, perhaps, in the way he has done. But I think it probable, that on the discussion of the affair last night, or Thursday, enough may have transpired to show that pr Peter Watson deserves no favor. Still it is desirable I shd be prepared for any communication that may be made to me, &, before that occurs, you & I may have some farther conference upon it.”
“Mr Gray, I find, has written to Mr Faber a letter verbatim the same as that he sent to you. Considering Mr Faber's multiplicity of other avocations, it was rather ill-judged to trouble him upon such a matter & I think he has done wisely in declining it especially as his undertaking it might seem to give it that sort of authority from Auckland Castle which I wished to avoid.”
“I send you three more Copies of my Speech & if more shd be wished for, either of that Speech or of the Others on the Test Repeal, they shall be at your service.”
“I hope to hear a favorable report of you. Yours etc.”
Paper, 1f
VML 54   7 July 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“I thank you for your letter & heartily wish it gave a more favourable report of your health. You may set your mind, however, entirely at ease, as to the matter of Winlaton, or any other concern on my account which might induce you to hasten your return homewards. Before I recd your letter I had determined on postponing all excursions on Diocesan business until after the Assizes, not deeming it quite prudent yet to encounter fatigue of that kind. I have now also come to another determination, that of passing a fortnight at Harrogate, between this & the Assizes. Accordingly I have written to Mr Richardson, to request him to secure a house for us to go into on Thursday the 10th instant next, & to remain till the Thursday fortnight following - which, though but a short space of time, I hope may suffice to give me so much drinking & bathing as to render some service. With this plan in view, I forbear entering now upon other topics, hoping to have the pleasure of greeting you viva voce - but with a full determination not to let you exercise your voice upon my obtuse organs of Learning, until Mr Richardson assures me you may do so with impunity. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 55   12 July [1828]
Letter from WVM at Granby Lodge [Harrogate] to [CT].
“Can you throw any light on the letter I herewith send you & which I recd this morning or shall I send it to Archdn Singleton for information? You may return it to me at your convenience. ”
“I hope this unpleasant change of weather does not materially affect you. It seems likely to confine us both to our respective dwellings for the day. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 56   23 July [1828]
Letter from WVM to [CT].
“I thank you for your note & for your suggestions respecting Newcastle, which in due time I shd be very glad to have effected. Your memorandum also of Ryton I will keep by me - but not with such foreboding as can create any personal interest in it, & which I earnestly hope may never be realized in my incumbency.”
“As you do not notice, you may not have heard, the sad tidings of the Archbishop [of Canterbury]'s decease. He was released from his sufferings the day before yesterday. The Church could not, I conceive, at the present crisis, have sustained a heavier loss, notwithstanding my reliance on a gracious over ?seeing Providence, & my confidence in the present Government. I cannot but feel great anxiety & apprehension as to some of the changes which may result from this mournful occurrence. Personally also I feel it deeply. The invariable kindness & confidence His Grace has always shewn me, attached me sincerely to him & have made impressions not to be effaced. Yours etc.”
Paper, 1f
VML 57   24 July [1828] dated as 1830
Letter from WVM at Ryhope to [CT].
“I am glad to find that we can with perfect convenience give you a bed at Auckland Castle for the Visitation there, & I hope you will gratify us by accepting it. If you do not wish to be at home on Sunday, we shall be glad to see you on Saturday next to dinner, & to stay with us till Tuesday. But you will arrange that point as you think best. Our Chancellor, Mr Dukes, will come to us on Saturday, & our Preacher Dr Phillpotts has been, I believe, invited by Mrs Van Mildert.”
“The consecration of the Chapel here has gone off very satisfactorily.”
“I had fully intended writing to you before, to thank you & Mrs Thorp for your very great kindness & hospitality during my abode at Ryton, which I can truly say has been among the most gratifying circumstances of my tour, & will not soon be forgotten. Yours etc.”
“We are now moving off to Castle Eden, where we dine & rest tonight - tomorrow at Egglescliffe - Thursday at Norton - & Friday, I hope, at Auckland.”
Paper, 2f
VML 58   25 July [1828]
Letter from WVM to [CT].
“ Before we start, I am anxious to know how you & your young lady are this morning, & to hear that you have no increase of Cold.”
“I have a letter this morning from Mr S.S. Wood, apprizing me of his wish to leave his Cure immediately. You had prepared me to expect this, & I am not desirous of retaining him. But I hope the duty will not be entirely neglected in the interval of appointing his successor.”
“Bear in mind my proposal yesterday, & let me hear from you soon. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 59   29 July 1828
Letter from C.J. Plumer at Auckland Castle to CT at Hammerton Hall, Boroughbridge.
“The Bishop wishes me to write a line to you to know whether you have any means of coming at the incumbent of Medomsley, the cure of which place I understand is on the point of becoming vacant, as he is anxious to offer the Curacy to a young man of considerable ability, who wishes to come into the Diocese - a nephew of Mr Petit the member for Ripon.”
“I have been grieved to hear of your illness, but am glad to find that Mr Richardson speaks very favourably of your case. We shall miss you sadly at the Assizes. Strong also will be absent. Yours etc.”
“I hope I shall soon have an opportunity of having some conversation on parochial matters with you.”
Paper, 2f
VML 60-62    8 August 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Hammerton Hall, Boroughbridge (cancelled, replaced by Dragon).
“I recd your letter at Durham where I was too much occupied in other matters to acknowledge it as I wished to do.”
“Your presence at the Assizes, though under other circumstances it wd have been most acceptable, wd only have oppressed me with anxiety if you had been so rash as to have attempted it in your present state of indisposition. We had no want of help, & every thing went off satisfactorily. Yet I was not sorry when the bustle ended, being scarcely well enough to go through with it without inconvenience. But we returned her on Wednesday Evening & the refreshing air & quiet of this place are already producing good effect.”
“Your report of yourself is encouraging & I hope will continue to be so. Whenever the doctors will allow you to give us personal evidence to that effect we shall be “right glad”:- but “festina lente” is a wise aphorism, & you must adopt it as your own. ”
“Our public days here are fixed for the 19th, 22nd, 26th & 29th of this month. The interval between that & the meeting of the Sons of the Clergy (Sept 4th) will hardly admit of any intermediate engagements. But between the 4th of Sept and the York festival, (to which we are invited) may be as convenient an opportunity as any for the consecrations & confirmations which were omitted last year - & if it shd so happen that you can with safety & convenience be at Ryton during that interval, the Chapel at Winlayton may be included in the list. At present I calculate that about ten days (from Septr 9th to Septr 19th inclusive) will be quite sufficient for the whole concern - i.e. for confirming at Chester le Street, consecrating Winlayton, confirming & consecrating at Haltwhistle, & confirming at Elsdon. The precise days for each I do not yet determine, wishing to have your convenience specially consulted - & moreover if you think that October (after my Michaelmas Ordination) will be altogether more suitable, I shall have no objection to postpone it till then. My purpose, indeed, in mentioning all these matters so minutely is that you may regulate your own movements in the easiest manner for yourself, & that your visit to us at Auckland may also fall in with our public or private days here, just as your strength & inclination may prompt you.”
“I have heard nothing from Mr Green respecting the Sons of the Clergy, & conclude the sermon is provided for.”
“I hear that some rather tart observations were made on the Dean of Chester's letter respecting Bp Barrington's monument - yet, as he has taken that occasion to make a large donation to the Jubilee Schools, in lieu of a subscription to the monument, I think any harsh reflections might have been spared. But I do not know the tenor of the reflections.”
“Ebchester & Medomsley remain, I presume, as yet unsettled. I shall be glad if the respectable young man whom Mr Plumer mentioned to you, can have them & be disposed to take them.”
“Mr Waite of Sunderland, late Curate of Seaham, has again written to me, imploring a Curacy. I think you spoke well of him & so does Mr Baker. An opportunity just offers to place him where perhaps he may be useful. Mr Otter of Bothal has informed me that his Son having vacated the Curacy of Mitford, Mr Nicholson has desired him to say that he will gladly give a Title for Orders to any gentleman that I may be disposed to recommend, on a stipend of £40, for which the Curate is to preach at Mitford every Sunday morning, & to take the duty of Morpeth Jail in the afternoon. The Stipend does not seem adequate to the duty, nor shd I think it sufficient as a title for Orders. Neither is the Jail duty quite suitable to an inexperienced Clergyman. If you thought Mr Waite fit for it, I wd propose him, upon an increased Stipend. But I shd first inquire more particularly as to the tenure of the Jail Chaplaincy, & its emoluments, that I may better judge what the Curate's Stipend shd be. Let me know your opinion.”
“The Living of Osmotherley near the Cleveland Inn, Yorkshire, is just vacant & is in my gift. On inquiry, I find it to be about £110 pr annum, & perhaps a little improveable, with no Glebe House. The Ch. Wardens (Mr Pierse of Thimbleby Lodge & Mr Wetherell of Wathmill) have applied for it on behalf of the Curate, Mr James Brown who has served it 20 years, & of whom they made a good report. Do you know either of the parties, or any thing of the Living? It seems to offer a fair opportunity of providing for some worthy Curate in my own Diocese, with no better prospects: & I shd be glad to attend to any recommendation of yours or to know whether you wd advise to bestow it on Mr Brown - I do not much like such applications yet they may sometimes be worth attention. ”
“I have written a long letter for want of time to write a shorter. But I hope it will not fatigue you. Yours etc.”
“What think you of giving Osmotherley to Mr Waite? or to Mr Dobson? or Proctor's late Curate of Lesbury, whose name I think is Lishman? or do you prefer anyone else?”
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 63   11 August 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“We shall be happy to receive you on Saturday next, & it wd have been an additional pleasure to us, if Mrs Thorp & the young folks could have accompanied you.”
“As you do not propose coming till the Evening, we shall not wait dinner for you.”
“I postpone all other matters till we meet. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 64   5 September 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“I thank you for your last night's note.”
“I should think the hour of half past eleven will suit very well for the Consecration & I quite agree with you that it will be desirable to proceed immediately from the Chapel to the Rectory House, where the Dinner hour may be arranged as best suits your own convenience - & the less company we have, the better, both for you & me.”
“I have no doubt that the ceremonials to be observed will be quite such as I shall approve. You know I have no appetite for more of ceremony than occasion really requires, or may be necessary to satisfy others. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 65   28 September 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“[I rec]d your letter here last night on my return from the York Festival. I thank you for it, & shall act upon it accordingly. At present, I have only time to say that we hope to see you here on Thursday or Friday next & that you will stay with us till the Tuesday or Wednesday following, your friends at Axwell Park having promised us to favor them with a visit on Monday or Tuesday. Dr Doyly comes here on Thursday next - & [I have] written to engage Archdn Singleton. We have to [lost] bachelor visitors he[re]. Yours etc.”
Paper, 1f, damaged by damp, some text lost
VML 66   1 October 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“We are very glad to hear that we may expect you on Friday. Mrs Van Mildert desires me to add, that she had postponed inviting Mrs Thorp to accompany you, until it was certain she could at the same time offer accommodation to some of your young party also. In consequence of Mr & Mrs Stanley having left us yesterday, there will now be a homely sort of Nursery vacant, sufficient for two young ones & their Maid Servant, & it will give us much pleasure if Mrs Thorp & the two eldest will join our party.”
“I hope this letter will reach you in due time to make this arrangement, yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 67-69   18 October 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton.
“I had delayed answering your letter till I had seen the Dean of Chester, who dined here yesterday. He is as well pleased as I am with retaining such a person as you describe the Sub-Curate of Darlington to be; but whose name neither the Dean nor I can decipher, nor have I any memorandum of him in my Diocesan books. You will, however, do us both a kindess if you will immediately open a correspondence with him on the subject, & endeavour to engage him for the situation at St John's in Weardale, if he can relinquish Darlington at so short a notice.”
“The Dean is desirous that the Stipend shd be £150 pr annum. My only doubt on that point is, whether the benefice, which does not appear to be much more than £170 certain income, (exclusive of the Surrogateship which has hitherto gone with it) can safely be charged with so large a deduction; especially as it may be desirable to reserve some portion towards the support of Waite himself, who, notwithstanding his delinquency, must not be reduced to actual starvation. Nevertheless, rather than the Chapel & Chapelry shd be ill supplied, I wd venture to fix the Stipend at the rate of £150, & find other means, if necessary, for Waite's support. You will be so good as to let me have your opinion on this point.”
“Another point to be considered is the residence of the Curate. The Glebe House it appears is a miserably poor one, & in bad repair. It might therefore be requisite to reserve something out of the proceeds of the benefice to keep it up, or to put it into better condition. To do so, I apprehend, wd become a part of the duty of the Sequestrators; & this might occasion a larger defalcation in the emoluments than we are aware of. But it seems to me, that, to prevent inconvenience in this respect to the intended Curate, it were better that he shd obtain Lodgings in the Chapelry, which ( if he be a single man) might also be less burthensome to him than keeping house. The Dean thinks this might be practicable, & he will inquire about it. He also wishes that, if possible, the person you have in view cd come to him at Stanhope, (before he sets out for Chester on next Monday fortnight) & judge for himself on the spot as to these different arrangements. After the 26th of this month, when the sentence of suspension is to be promulgated, there will be no impropriety in his visiting Stanhope for that purpose, & I shd strongly advise his doing so.”
“I have gone into this detail, in order to put you in possession of our joint views on the subject, before I start for Harrogate, which at present it is our intention to do on Tuesday next, & to stay there a fortnight. On my return, I shd hope to find this matter nearly, if not definitively, arranged, & we can in the mean while exchange letters as occasion may require.”
“The other subject of your letter, Etherley, claims also my especial attention. I shd hope there will be no insuperable difficulty attending it. I am well aware it behoves the Bp of Durham not to be wanting in a case so near home, & in which he ought to feel a more than ordinary interest - & though I cannot attempt to vie with the intended munificence of my predecessor in this instance, I am not less disposed to go to the full extent of my means in so good & so necessary a work. My first intention is to ascertain whether I can offer a scite for the building of a Chapel, which Mr Faber & Mr Davison will immediately look to. My next purpose is to offer an endowment of it with £100 or £200, as a nucleus to be enlarged in due time by a grant from Q. Anne's Bounty. To this I wd willingly add another one or two hundred pounds as a contribution towards the Building itself. I should then hope, that the whole matter may be accomplished, without drawing at all upon the scanty revenues of the living of St Helen's Auckland, which wd ill bear any impoverishment. Let me know whether you think this as much as can fairly be expected from me - & tell me so sincerely. I am ready to do more, if I ought to do so.”
“At present I am not aware that any good can be done by giving you the trouble of journeying to Etherley; & I shd be sorry if you did so whilst I am absent from this place, which shd be your head quarters. Yours etc.”
“P.S. Perhaps in the course of the negociations respecting St John's Weardale, time may be saved by your communicating with the Dean of Chester during my absence, & there can be no doubt that what you & he concur in will be readily acceded to on my part.”
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 70   27 October 1828
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT.
“There is scarcely time, before the Post goes out, to acknowledge your kind letter.”
“I see no objection to some Declaration, or Petition, or both, against concession to the Roman Catholics - & I have full confidence in the Conclave at Ryton, that whatever is there concocted will be befitting the rest of the Clergy to adopt. You need not my counsel - &, personally, it is better that I shd not be committed. You know also my wish that, in such cases, firmness, moderation, & caution shd be united. It cannot be necessary for me to suggest to such individuals as those who are to discuss the matter, how it is to be done.”
“The result of the meeting of the Men of Kent appears to have been highly satisfactory.”
“I much doubt whether the Dean of Durham will be quite so alert as his Brother Dean. I could rather wish he had a little more of that spirit.”
“Thanks for the trouble you have taken in writing toMr Minton. I sincerely hope he will accept the offer. On this subject, you will of course have some further coversation with the rector of Stanhope.”
“Pray, make my best regards to the Bp of St Davids & his Lady, as well as to your Lady - also to the Dean of Chester, Mr Collinson, &c if you think fit to let them know that I have written to you. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 71   2 November 1828
Letter from F. Prosser at Belmont House [to CT].
“I hasten to return an answer to yours of the 25th Ulto respecting a meeting of the clergy to take into their consideration the Propriety of petitioning Parliament against further concessions to the Roman Catholics.”
“You know my mind on that subject, which has never been altered, and, you may be assured that I shall always be ready to cooperate with my Revd Brothers in any proper & well-timed measure. But if I may be allowed to offer an opinion as to the time when such a measure might be proper, I should say, that, at this moment, it appears to me to be premature. No claims for further concessions as yet can be forwarded to Parliament by the Roman Catholics. But, perhaps, something may be done by Government to prevent further parliamentary Dissension on that subject.”
“With respect to an address to the King, it appears to me to be unnecessary. For I cannot suppose the Sovereign to be insensible to the Mischief which would follow from the admission of Roman Catholics to the full benefit of political power in our Protestant Constitution. I presume, therefore, that the King is prepared to put his Negative upon such a Measure of Concession. Were he to act otherwise he would endanger our Protestant Constitution as settled at the Reformation in the Line of the House of Brunswick. Indeed should it be deemed proper for the Clergy to address the Crown on that very important subject, I am of opinion that the whole body of the Clergy in Convocation, and not a Diocesan Clergy, should be the authors of such a Measure.”
“As I expect to be at Durham on or rather before the 20th inst I hope the Postponement of the business to that time will not be inconvenient to the Requisitionistes, as Parliament will not meet till the latter end of Jany. Yours etc.”
Paper, 1f
VML 72   5 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT.
“We returned from Harrogate yesterday, & this morning I recd your letters in consequence of which I dispatched a messenger to Stanhope, hoping that the Dean might still be there - but unfortunately he had taken flight towards Chester.”
“My object in writing to him was to ascertain whether he wd consent to become sequestrator - or, if not, wd approve of Mr Minton's being so appointed, or recommend some other person in preference. Also, whether he cd point out some person to officiate, pro tempore, at St John's, until Mr Carr cd more conveniently spare Mr Minton. All these inquiries are now rendered fruitless, & there is hardly time to admit of corresponding upon the matter with the Dean at Chester. Something therefore must be done promptly; & unwilling as I am to burthen you more than can be avoided, I know not how to get through the business without your immediate help.”
“May we, then, venture to make the Dean sequestrator, nolens volens? Or may we, without irregularity appoint Mr Minton? I am ready for either course, as you & Mr Raine may advise. I think, too, there can be no hazard in engaging that the Sequestrator shall put the Glebe House into tenantable repair, & defray the cost out of the proceeds of the Benefice. Only, in that case, Mr Minton must not complain if the Stipend to be allotted to him shd fall somewhat short of what is proposed. The main difficulty seems to be that of providing a person to officiate before Mr M. can be fairly disengaged from Darlington - or else to enable Mr Carr to get a substitute for him there. Have you anything in contemplation to effect this? If you have, I will readily give you a carte blanche to do as you find practicable, without waiting for my expressed concurrence. It is altogether a most perplexing business - & the Dean's moving off just at the very crisis when his co-operation is specially desirable, greatly increases the embarrassment. ”
“Mr Raine perhaps wd be the fittest person to advise whether Mr Minton can with propriety in point of form be nominated sequestrator. If he can, it may be the readiest way of getting rid of that difficulty. If not, can you think of any other person? I can scarcely now touch on the other subjects you have mentioned. I do not doubt that the clergy will frame their petition in such a way as you will approve - & that will be the likeliest to ensure my approbation. I recollect, however, that the Dean of Chester last year refused to sign the Petition then framed on the ground (I think) that it seemed to preclude all possibility of coming to terms with the Catholics - which at that time he was not willing altogether to assent to. Whether the turn that matters have lately taken in Ireland may have changed his views in that respect, I know not. But, I presume by his not attending the conference at Ryton, he does not mean to take any prominent part.”
“ I do not allow myself to reckon upon Whickham till it actually becomes vacant. That it shd so long be kept in suspense, I can only attribute to the devise of taking the chance of something that may yet occur either to retain it or to make some other arrangement, it is difficult to conjecture what. ”
“We are in pretty good plight & hope you and Mrs Thorp are the same. Yours etc”
Paper, 2f
VML 73   6 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I have just recd your letter respecting Etherley & Satley - both important concerns, & which I hope will be carried through without much difficulty. I am quite willing to contribute £200 to Etherley besides an endowment of £100, & perhaps some waste land for a Glebe House & Garden. Nor shall I suffer the scheme to fail for lack of somewhat more if more be wanted. Mr Pierse, I think, shd be applied to before Sir A. Eden & Sir C. Musgrave. He is the largest Proprietor in that district & might induce the two others to do as much. ”
“I will say more about Satley at some future time. You may be assured, however, that I shall readily come forward with a donation proportioned to what may still be wanted. I write amidst continual interruptions & can add no more at present than etc. ”
“I shd pefer naming Dr Phillpotts as Sequestrator, if you think we may do so without first obtaining his consent. Yours etc”
Paper, 1f
VML 74   6 November 1828
Letter from WVM to CT at Ryton
“Since sealing the larger packet for this Post, I add a line to say that my friend Mr Downes is coming to us on Monday next to stay two nights, & that if it be quite convenient to you to meet him here either on Monday or Tuesday, or on both days, we shall be very glad of the pleasure of your company.”
“It occurs to me also that Mr Stobart expresses a wish (in his letter to you) that you could go over to Etherley; & shd you be inclined so to do, a morning from hence might be so appropriated without much inconvenience, though I do not see the necessity of your taking that trouble. But, at all events, we shall have much pleasure in seeing you, if you find yourself quite stout & well able to come to us. Yours etc. ”
Paper, 1f
VML 75-76   10 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“I certainly do not expect to see you today, & should indeed be exceedingly sorry were you to venture out in such weather as this. Let your health be the first of all considerations at present & run no risk that can possibly be avoided. I almost wish that you had already taken your departure for the South, & left other concerns to other hands. We shall gladly hope to ensure a greater length of your valuable services to the Church & to ourselves, by abridging somewhat of those which the present crisis renders so desirable. You will choose your own time, however, & convenience, in coming here - & be assured, whether with or without notice, of a hearty welcome. I return the Archdeacon's letter, & regret the view he takes of the matter. A meeting of the Convocation might be called, I apprehend, malgre the will of the Cabinet - but nothing is more unlikely considering who must be the prime movers of such a measure; & the movement itself might probably avail but little, or might do harm. To me, there seems no objection to the usual mode of petitioning the Legislature, or addressing the King - though this latter expedient, on the part of the Clergy, may perhaps be more questionable. I think you need not be entirely reserved with respect to my sentiments on this subject. But I commit myself to your discretion. If the Dean of Chester will take the Sequestration, it will satisfy me better than any other, except yourself. If Mr Raine sees no objection, & you have none, will you put the matter in train? Time wd perhaps be lost by my opening a correspondence with Mr Raine. But I will do so, if you think it necessary. ”
“How can I immediately ordain a sub-curate for Darlington? No one has been mentioned to me, no papers sent, nor any overtures made to me. Whenever Mr Carr is prepared with a fit person, I am ready to give facilities. But I inclose a letter recd a day or two ago from Mr Furness Junr of Ponteland. Might he not do for Darlington? If so, he cd take it directly.”
“ I will consider what you say about Mr Fielding. But I shd prefer the other plan. With our united best regards to Mrs C. Thorp, & yourself, yours etc. ”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 77-78   13 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I am greatly obliged to you for the trouble you are still taking respecting St John's & shall be well satisfied with any arrangement you can make. I hope there will be no hesitation on the part of Mr Minton. If Mr Carr shd be ready forthwith with a fit substitute for him at Darlington, I wd use all diligence to forward the matter, & wd even hold a private ordination for him rather than protract it inconveniently. The Abp of York, however, holds an Ordination (as I am informed) on the 14th of December; & it seems not very probable that the intended candidate should be ready much sooner - in which case, a letter dimissory to the Archbishop wd answer the purpose. But I shall be ready to act pro re nata.”
“ I am vexed with our good friend the Archdeacon, & am willing to hope that if the matter can be suspended until he comes to Durham next week, he may be induced to take a different course. But that seems now impracticable, by the measure adopted of sending round the Draft of an Address to the King for individual signatures. This Draft was sent here to Mr Fielding the day before yesterday with a letter from Mr Baker, intimating a wish on the part of himself & others of the Clergy that I would look it over, for the purpose of giving it my sanction, or of making such alterations as I might think proper. This I did not think advisable, & therefore wrote a few civil lines to Mr Baker declining to do so, but expressing my hope that I shd not be considered as in any way discouraging or discountenancing their laudable wishes to come forward at such a crisis. It was somewhat ill-judged of our friend at Whitburne to place me in this predicament, but I hope I have backed out of it with a tolerable grace. It strikes me that probably the Archdeacon shrinks from what he may conceive to imply a doubt of the intentions of the Cabinet on this subject. You will have seen, perhaps, a letter in the papers today by Ld Verulam, declining to call a Brunswick meeting in Herts. Ld V. being a staunch friend of Govt, a brother-in-law of Ld Liverpool, & hitherto an invariable voter against the Catholic claims, I fear his conduct in this instance may be taken as a pretty clear indication of what he knows or believes to be the intentions of Govt & if so, it strongly confirms the Dean of Chester's surmises, that the matter is so far determined upon, as to become a mere question of terms. I have surmised this ever since Mr Peel's ominous silence at Manchester; & not a syllable having yet been communicated to me upon the subject from any of my friends who are near head-quarters, & likely to hear something about it. I am still more apprehensive that this is the case, & that those who are most aware of my sentiments are unwilling to let me know the real state of the case.”
“Notwithstanding all this, I am willing to hope the best, & I really cannot see the harm or the impropriety of the Clergy manifesting their feelings & their fears as strongly as they choose to do, short of any thing that may imply censure upon the Govt or want of confidence either in the Cabinet or the Legislature.”
“I am unwilling, while you are an invalid, & troubled with so may other things, to add any thing to your burthens. But a letter I recd ten days ago, & which I intended to have shewn you if you had come here, from Mr Ripley, respecting Chester le Street, I wish to submit to your consideration, & shall be glad of your opinion upon it. It does credit to Mr Ripley, &, as far as it goes, I am inclined to be satisfied with it. Other points, which you suggested some time since, respecting the want of additional Churches or Chapels in that parish, may be reserved for future consideration. But do you think I ought to insist upon the Glebe House you mentioned being allotted to the Curate? & if so, ought the Stipend to remain as it is?”
“When you next write, pray tell me how you are going on. This foggy weather, I fear, is against you. But I hope you are as easeful as you ought to be, & submit as an obedient Husband should do, to Mrs Thorp's discipline. Yours etc.”
Paper, 4f
VML 79-80   14 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“I fear my letters give you much more trouble than yours give me - for mine generally tend to increase your labours, & yours to diminish mine. This letter, however, will be an exception as it is merely to thank you for that I have recd from you this morning, & which greatly relieves my anxiety respecting St John's. Mr Carr's letter is very satisfactory, & makes me feel much obliged to him. ”
“Mr. & Mrs. Henry Liddell of Bolton are coming here next Tuesday to stay 2 or 3 days with us. Should you be quite well enough by that time to venture from home, we shall be very glad to see you. But run no risk. I long to hear that you are preparing to migrate southward. Do not imprudently delay it. ”
“Mr Bowdler of Kent, whom I think you met here last year, has sent me a paper which I inclose under another cover, & which you will read with interest. It does the Kentish Clergy credit, & perhaps may suggest a hint or two to our Durham friends. You may make what use of it you please - but when you have done with it, I shall be glad to have it again, being the only copy in my possession. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 81   18 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“As I can hardly hope to see you during this unsettled weather, I write a few lines to thank you for your letters of the 14th & 15th - both exceedingly satisfactory, but which do not now require any further observation to express my entire concurrence in what has already been done, & in what is yet proposed to be done. It only strikes me to suggest, whether Mr Birkby, whom Mr Raine recommends for St John's, might not do equally well to supply Mr Minton's place at Darlington; in which case the whole matter might be forthwith arranged, to the immediate removal of Mr Carr's anxiety & trouble. But you can better judge of this than I can. Possibly such an arrangement might only be removing a difficulty from Mr Carr, by transferring it to Mr Macfarlane, who wd have to provide some one else for Denton. Yet if Denton be a place of minor importance, the want there might be more easily supplied.”
“I have written to Mr Ripley suggesting the principal points you have touched upon at his readiness to meet my wishes in what he had already proposed. I am willing to hope we shall find things take a better turn than hitherto in that parish.”
“The Darnells are coming here today to meet our friends from Boldon. The rest of our neighbours around us are otherwise engaged, & we shall muster but a slender party. I hope you are still making good progress, & shall be glad to hear so. Yours etc. ”
Paper, 2f
VML 82-83   21 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“At your leisure, be so good as to look over the inclosed letter from the Vicar of Newcastle, & favour me with your opinion upon what he suggests. I incline to think that if he can raise sufficient to produce (when met by a correspondent Benefaction from the Bounty Board) an equivalent for what is now given by the Corporation of Newcastle, it may be better than leaving the matter dependent, as it now is, upon the will & pleasure of the Corporation. But is it probable that so much can be raised? The Vicar seems to me to be likely ere long, to embroil himself with the Corporation on the subject of the Milk Tythe - in which case the Right Worshipful Body would probably seek some indemnification by withholding from the Church whatever they now give in the way of largesse. But that is not a matter on which I need give an opinion; & I suppose he does not wish it to be talked of. You will let me have his letter again. ”
“The cold winds we have had make me wish to hear that you are preparing to migrate, notwithstanding the improved accounts of your health.”
“ I saw the Archdeacon at Durham on Friday last, looking pretty well, but a little vexed at the hasty proceedings of our friend at Whitburne, in putting about an Address before his arrival. I do think that the delay of a few days wd have been but civil towards our venerable friend; &, from what he said, I have no doubt he wd have readily acquiesced in doing what the Clergy desired, though perhaps with some little modification as to the course of proceedings. He dines & sleeps here on Thursday next. I wd ask you to meet him, if I were sure that you might prudently do so. Should that be the case, I need not say that we shd be glad to see you. I do not ask you for Wednesday (the day after tomorrow) because we shall, I fear, be quite overflowing & have already been obliged to put off two or three whom we had intended receiving on that day. But on Thursday we shall be reduced to a very manageable party, & an unceremonious one.”
“We are going today to dine at the Deanery, Durham - but return here tomorrow as early as we can, to give me time for a warm bath, which a sort of rheumatic affection, caught by going out in an open carriage on Saturday, renders desirable. Yours etc.”
“P.S. At Oxord, they are about to publish a few Sermons of the late Hebrew Professor, Dr Nickell, for the benefit of his Widow & family, including those he preached before the University on the origin of Sacrifice, versus Davison. May I transmit your name to Parker, for a copy? ”
“Perhaps the two Collinsons might like to have their names also on the list. ”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 84-85   29 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“We shall be most happy to see you on Tuesday, subject to the conditions you mention of health & weather, both which I hope will prove favourable to our wishes & in that hope, I forbear troubling you for the present with any discussion on the subjects of your two last letters, except to say that from what the Archdeacon said when he was here the other day, I have no doubt that he will readily fall in with the wishes of his Clergy. It is very desirable that whatever is done shd be done with as much unanimity as possible; & I own I shd be sorry that in any measure to be adopted, it shd even seem not to have the concurrence of the Archdeacon.”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 86   30 November 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“Lest a continuance of this untoward weather shd perchance discourage you from coming to us on Tuesday, I write a few lines to thank you for those I have recd from you this morning, & to say that I am willing to receive Mr Toosey's papers as soon as they can be sent to me - which shd be done without delay, if it be intended to take advantage of the Archbishop's Ordination at Bishopthorpe on this day fortnight. I have already appointed one Candidate to come here for Examination on Thursday morning, the 10th of December, & if Mr Toosey can be ready by that time, the matter may be accomplished. If not, the difficulty may be insuperable, unless I were to hold an Ordination myself for that sole purpose, which may be very inconvenient to me, & perhaps impracticable, shd I be called to town (as is by no means improbable) earlier than I had intended. Perhaps you will write to this effect to Mr Carr.”
“Mr Dodds entertains rather odd notions of Ecclesiastical matters. But I think I shall prefer the present arrangement to calling on the aid of the quadruped. If Mr Ripley will, as I have suggested, put Mr Dodds into the Glebe House, his condition will be so far bettered, & perhaps he wd be content.”
“I forgot to mention in my letter yesterday, that young Park is to have Elwick, & that both he & his Father seem highly gratified. They are coming here early in next week, for the purpose of his being inducted, & his reading in on the Sunday after next; Dr Richardson having made that proposal, & invited them to Elwick Hall, in order to arrange everything on the spot for taking possession. It is a real comfort to me, to have had this opportunity of testifying my affectionate regard for one of my earliest & best friends. ”
“Other matters I postpone for the present. Yours etc ”
Paper, 2f
VML 87   2 December 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I cannot venture to expect you today, & therefore send a letter which came here for you yesterday.”
“Take the advantage of any inviting day that may offer, without troubling yourself to send previous notice. There will always be a well-aired apartment ready for you, & in a south aspect. At present, we have no engagement from home. Should any be intended, we will give you timely notice. Yours etc.”
Paper, 2f
VML 88   9 December 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I thank you for your letter, & for the trouble you have taken in communicating with Mr Carr & Mr Raine. Matters seem to be going on as smoothly as cd be expected. Mr Toosey's papers are arrived, & he promises to be here tomorrow for Examination. I shd be glad to hear that Waite wd endeavour to establish himself in the way you mention, & to retrieve his character; in which case, I shall be willing to befriend him as circumstances may permit. ”
“Perhaps you may have heard that circumstances have induced us to prepare for going up to London sooner than we had intended. It is our purpose to start from hence on Sunday next, & reach town on Wednesday or Thursday. Ere long, we may hope to see you in London, on your way still further southward.”
“I am sorry you make so poor a report of our good Archdeacon. But there is so much vis vitae in him, that I do not feel much apprehension for the result. A good regular fit of the Gout may set him up again.”
“Let me hear from you before our departure, &, with our united hearty good wishes to yourself & all around you, great or small, yours etc. ”
Paper, 2f, top right corner detached
VML 89-90   13 December 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“I thank you for sending me Mr Luke Ripley's letter. The same post, however, brought me a letter from Mr Ripley himself announcing the sad catastrophe and had terminated Mr Nicholson's life. I had moreover heard of the accident the day before from Mr Jones of St Bees who came for the purpose of being examined for Orders on Mr Nicholson's nomination of him to the Curacy of Mitford; but which, of course, I have been obliged to put aside in consequence of this disaster, greatly to poor Mr Jones's disappointment, who appears to be a worthy young man, & whom I shd be glad to have nominated to some other cure, at the first convenient opportunity, to make him amends for this unfortunate occurrence.”
“The Living of Mitford now falls to my disposal - a small benefice, I apprehend, but for which there may probably be many competitors. Mr Furnass of Ponteland has already applied for it - but I know of no special pretensions he has to offer, except that on a former occasion, Mr Bell, the County Member, was induced to write to me on his behalf. I have been thinking whether it might not be acceptable to Mr Luke Gasker, Mr Darnell's Curate at Norham, a worthy & respectable man. Have you any thing to suggest on this matter? & can you tell me any particulars of the value & circumstances of the Living, which may assist my judgement? I hardly imagine that it can be a desirable object to any of my southern friends; but it may afford a fair opportunity of benefiting some deserving Curate of the Diocese.”
“I grieve that you have been so harassed about the R.C. petition. Your view of the subject entirely accords with mine. Yet many, I believe, though thoroughly affected to the Establishment, adopt the somewhat squeamish notions of your Gateshead friend. This is doing things by halves - but perhaps, better so, than doing nothing at all. Do not secede I pray you, as long as you can retain any influence. ”
“May I trouble you, at your perfect convenience, to apply the inclosed Draft of £8 to the payment of Mr Lister's Bill at Newcastle (also inclosed) for the Gold Coin, which ought to have been paid for long ago, & to send me Lister's receipt for it? We are in full preparation for moving off on Monday, & hope to sleep in Hanover Square on Thursday, where I shall hope to find a letter from you, if I do not receive one here by tomorrow's post. Yours etc.”
“ Justice Park & his son left us yesterday in high glee for Elwick. ”
“[P.S.] Mr. Toosey arrived in g[ood] time for his Examination & w[ent] off from hence to York with hi[s] [Le]tter Dimissory yesterday or [this] morning. ”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 91   15 December 1828
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I inclose a letter which I recd this morning from Mr Wood of S. Shields, soliciting the Living of Mitford, & accompanied with a strong letter of recommendation from Mr Burnell of Broome Park. What say you to it? It is early days for so young a Noviciate to press his claims. Yet I feel no great disinclination, if you are disposed to second his petition. I mentioned Mr Garker, before, to you - but to no one else. And there may be others in your thoughts, who ought to have a preference. ”
“I have a letter from Mr Grey this morning, announcing his Induction to Bishopsgate, & the consequent avoidance of Whickham. I may mention to you, in confidence, that I have offered the latter to Mr H. Liddell, who declines it. Possibly I may ruminate on these matters as I go to town, & there I shall hope to hear from you. But I have many things upon my mind, & being just about to take wing, can say no more at present, yours etc. ”
Paper, 2f
VML 92   19 December 1828
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“I thank you for the letter I found on my table on my arrival here yesterday - and though well pleased to hear a good report of your state of health, am somewhat anxious to know that you have got rid of any unpleasant sensations from your late accident. ”
“Our journey was, upon the whole, favourable & pleasant, though yesterday the weather was somewhat boisterous. We reached home in excellent time, & found our household had preceded us without any untoward occurrence. ”
“This morning has been pretty fully taken up by visitors & other matters usual on a first arrival in town; & I have no time to dilate on other concerns. As soon as I can collect my wits, I shall probably take some steps respecting Whickham & Mitford - but I must have a day or two of leisure to think of them.”
“ I am glad the perplexities of the petition are at last got over. You will have seen that Parlt does not meet for dispatch of business till the beginning of February - so that there is abundance of time on hand. ”
“Again, I must teaze you to hasten your journey southward. The weather is now mild & encouraging. Another week or two may impede you with frost or snow, & make you rue delay. Take good advice, & with our united kind regards to you & Mrs Thorp & the young ones, yours etc. ”
“Mr Roddam Douglas, Curate of Trimdon, has applied for the Living of Mitford. Have you anything to predicate of him? ”
Paper, 2f
VML 93-94   27 December 1828
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“I owe you thanks for two valuable letters, & wd have sooner paid the debt, had circumstances permitted - but of time it often happens that I find myself in a state of insolvency. ”
“I have made the offer of Mitford to Mr Garker, & this morning recd his answer, requesting a few days to make inquiry, but intimating an inclination to accept it. Should he decline it, I intend immediately to offer it to Mr Shute, whom, as a worthy man, & an old College acquaintance, though a very slight one, I shd be glad to oblige. Whickham begins to be a burthen on my mind. Mr Strong has reconsidered it, & conferred with Mr Grey upon it - but the result has confirmed his opinion that he had better decline it - & I think he has judged rightly. I am still thinking of Mr Downes, whose ability & activity I have no doubt wd prove him quite equal to the charge, though somewhat more of professional experience might be desirable. I have thought also of two or three other excellent men, with whom I have formerly been more or less connected or acquainted, who might do credit to the appointment. Mr Saumarez, Son & Heir to Admiral Sir James Saumarez, was once my Curate at Ewelme, & one of the very best Parish Priests; & has, I know, rather looked to me with expectation. A Chancellor's Living in Yorkshire was given him some 3 or 4 years ago by Ld Eldon - but so ill circumstanced in point of situation that probably he wd be glad to part with it. But I fear his health has not been quite in good order nor have I any knowledge at present where he is residing, or how he is going on. ”
“Another excellent man of the same character & condition is Mr Napier, a Son of the late Lord Napier, & a connection (I believe) of the Claverings of Axwell. He too was Lloyd's Curate at Ewelme, & such a curate as scarcely could be paralleled for everything good & exemplary. Moreover, he also has got a Chancellor's Living in Oxfordshire where he has just built a commodious house, & it were almost pity to remove him from it, though I imagine it is inferior, much, in value to Whickham. Another man I believe not inferior to either of them in character & qualifications, is a Mr Boissier, some time since a Commoner at Ch.Ch. much esteemed & respected, & the Son of one of Mrs Van Mildert's most valued early friends, a woman of rare talents & qualities inestimable. He is the worthy Son of such a Mother, & of a Father no less estimable. He is a man of good fortune also, but has at present only a Curacy in Berkshire. ”
“From either of these I should have good reason to contemplate a satisfactory choice - though in each there are some considerations which make it doubtful whether the thing wd be quite suitable & I shd hardly know which to prefer. In this perplexity, the suggestion you have forwarded to me from Mrs Clavering gives a new turn to the whole affair. Haltwhistle, to a person who has no objection to place himself so far out of the reach of society, might be more desirable than Whickham; but I question if any of the individuals I have named wd not think that a grave objection. Possibly, my nephew Douglas might be tempted by its value to relinquish for it his Living in Gloucestershire. But I almost doubt it. Whickham, I think (all things considered) wd hardly be acceptable to him; & I am now disinclined to offer it. Having so fully & confidentially disclosed my thoughts on this subject, perhaps I may still take another day or two, before I determine upon it: & if I shd not have made up my mind until your arrival in the south, an opportunity may occur of an hour's conversation with you. In the meanwhile, you will be so good as not to intimate to Mrs Clavering anything respecting Haltwhistle. To say the truth, notwithstanding my regard for Hollingsworth, & the real pleasure I shd have in doing anything acceptable to Mrs Clavering, I somewhat doubt his fitness for the situation, from the unfortunate constitutional irritation under which he seems to labour, & the strange want of tact & judgement which he seems to betray on almost all occasions. These are drawbacks - although I really believe him to be one of the best-intentioned men in the world, & most conscientiously devoted to his professional duties. The females in his family are said, too, to have rather irregularly zealous propensities. But probably you know more of all this than I do. ”
“Let me have due notice of your movements, that I may not write to you at cross purposes. Yours etc. ”
Paper, 4f
1829
VML 95   16 January 1829
Letter from WVM at Addington Park to CT
Mr Liddell has accepted Whickham, the parish will be in good hands; WVM is now considering if Mr Hollingsworth would exchange Boldon for Haltwhistle, as he is keen to place his nephew William Ives who is “rather of rustic & retired habits” and is perhaps better suited to Haltwhistle, and WVM would thereby oblige Mrs Clavering so he would be grateful for CT's opinion; he is not sure if this will reach CT before he goes to Hammerton Hall; “the archbishop [of Canterbury] is as firm as possible & I do not find a shade of difference in our views of the great question”.
Paper, 2f
VML 96   23 January 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
WVM needs to know if Winlaton is styled as a church or a chapel for the title-page of his printed sermon; he hopes the snow and “piercing wind” will not delay CT from reaching London; as a result of CT's letter, he has offered Boldon to Mr Hollingsworth in exchange for Haltwhistle, he discusses the character of WVM's nephew [Mr Ives], “not deficient in exterior recommendation” though less academic than his brother, and short of experience.
Paper, 2f
VML 97   26 January 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
WVM will be on “guard respecting the Railway at Ryton” re the rectory there; he will put CT's offer to Archdeacon Singleton; he has written to Mr Hollingsworth and Mrs Clavering [re Boldon]; he approves of Archdeacon Headlam's letter but it may “not prevent measures which we may deprecate”; [the snow] is thawing now; he will enquire further into Mr Benson''s proposition which Mr Watson raised the other day but which he does not quite understand.
Paper, 2f
VML 98   15 February 1829
Letter from CT at Hastings to WVM
Seeking the cathedral prebendary vacant on the death of L[or]d B[ridgewater] to augment his income, as Ryton, which he does not want to leave, cannot provide for the growing costs of his “doubtful health & an increasing family” and he can only advance by his service in the diocese in which his father, grandfather and himself had served as beneficed clergy for nearly a century.
With cancellations and interlineations.
Paper, 2f
VML 99   19 February 1829
Letter from CT at Hastings to WVM enclosing the following
Discusses Mr Baker, who has not received any advice from WVM, and whose use of “we” and “the clergy” in their almost painful discussions CT has not understood but now takes to mean “I”, CT's copy reply is enclosed (below); CT is not impressed by the justifications of the duke [of Wellington] and Mr Peel; Professor Gaisford is a great acquisition to the diocese; he hopes to recover his health.
With cancellations and interlineations.
Paper, 2f
VML 100   19 February 1829
Copy letter from CT at Hastings to Mr Baker
Advising him, in the supposed absence of the archdeacon, to make an address to the king encouraging him to use his constitutional powers to avert the admission of Roman Catholics to government etc, along with short petitions to the two houses of parliament; CT suggests two meetings of deaneries to mobilise clergy opinion, and quite sympathises with the bishop of Durham's refusal to offer an opinion on this as the unbiased opinion of the clergy is what is needed; his own health prospects are good, as long as choking does not take him off.
With cancellations and interlineations.
Paper, 2f
VML 101-102   19 February 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at 30 Wellington Square, Hastings
He had not realised that CT was interested in Lord Bridgewater's stall which he had offered to Professor [Thomas] Gaisford as someone whose high desserts he had been keen to reward and who had been a good friend of their family from his wife's infancy; WVM had long intended to offer CT the archdeaconry of Durham which he had hoped the present archdeacon would resign; WVM is never “unmindful of your merits & pretensions”; do not worry about electioneering matters, there will be many neutrals.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 103   20 February 1829
Letter from CT to WVM
Grateful for his letter's “great friendship & approbation”, more valuable than any preferment; he entirely approves of Prof Gaisford's preferment whom he had thought would not wish to be elsewhere than at Oxford; he would be honoured to be archdeacon, which he had thought the present archdeacon had intended to resign at one point.
Paper, 2f
VML 104   21 February 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He will tell CT more fully in the future about the negotiations concerning Mr Gaisford and an Oxford canonry; he quite agrees with CT's letter to Mr Baker “a most worthy man but not gifted with the clearest judgement” whom he hopes will adopt CT's suggestions; the bishop of St Davids has written and his views are unfortunately different to WVM's as he eulogises Mr Peel and seems assured by the securities re the granting of admission to parliament which rather vexes WVM.
Paper, 2f
VML 105   23 February 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He has franked CT's enclosure to Mr Minton and inserted 2 guineas for Mr Thompson's remuneration; he advises against travelling to Oxford in the present piercing east wind and his vote would be thrown away as Mr Peel's success in the election is all but certain; his misgivings and forebodings are as comfortless as CT's so they need to rely on “Him whose providential case we have too often slighted & abused”.
Paper, 2f
VML 106   27 February 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Reporting that the Oxford poll stands at Sir R. Inglis 230, Peel 190.
Paper, 1f
VML 107   13 March 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Hopes that CT is coping with the piercing east winds; WVM is travelling between Richmond and Hanover Square; discusses the Bills which should pass the Commons and the duke [of Wellington]'s reply to Lord Winchelsea in the Lords makes him not optimistic for the Lords either.
Paper, 2f
VML 108-109   20 March 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Wellington Square, Hastings
Very sorry to pass on the news from Rome of Lord [George] Barrington's death; he has offered his stall to Professor Gaisford, and now offers his stall or the living of Sedgefield to CT; assumes CT would rather have the stall though he might be reluctant to leave Ryton; if CT takes the stall, he will offer Sedgefield to Mr Strong.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 110   21 March 1829
Letter from CT at Hastings to [WVM]
He will take the stall, but he is reluctant to leave his parochial duties at Ryton; to ensure WVM has his answer he is sending this by a friend to London.
Paper, 2f
VML 111    1 April 1829
Letter from WVM at Richmond to CT
Spending a day at Richmond before the conflict tomorrow; he hopes CT has not suffered any serious inconvenience from his misadventure at Sevenoaks; Denton is not on his ms list of episcopal patronage; the chapter are delighted about CT's taking the stall; discusses the prospects for the [Bill] in the Commons and General Gascoyne's speech, and Mr Peel's reaction to the laughter and shouts of “the radicals”.
Paper, 2f
VML 112-113   14 April 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Only just recovering his wits after the late vexations in parliament; he has only just forwarded CT's enclosed letter to Mr Minton; discusses the collations to their stalls of Professor Gaisford and CT; delighted that CT is to be one of Lord Crewe's trustees; CT does not need to be in residence until June and should stay on the south coast till then; CT should proceed to his degree, but only when his health allows; he would appreciate CT's advice on putting some Roman Catholics into the Commission of the Peace; he is relieved that the late affair is over, it does open a new scene and he discusses what the reaction to [emancipation of Roman Catholics] might be, a protest from the [Episcopal] bench would probably not be advisable but he almost wishes that they “had been more sturdy” and so many bishops “swerved from the plain path of duty” with St Davids grieving him most, though Oxford now has the credit of the king's levee or drawing-room.
Paper, 2f
VML 114   23 April 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Mr Gaisford was collated yesterday and the papers sent to Mr Darnell to be installed as his proxy; arrangements for CT's collation discussed; WVM is going to Dover.
5 May Forwarding two letters; hopes he is back at Hastings.
Paper, 1f
VML 115   28 April 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Arrived from Dover after a boisterous journey; he will attend the king's levee; Mr Ives comes to be collated to Haltwhistle when, if CT comes as well, his collation can be dealt with also; come for mutton tomorrow at 6.
Paper, 1f
VML 116   5 May 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Forwarding letters; hopes to hear of his safe return to Hastings and of Mrs Thorp's improvement.
Paper, 1f
VML 117   7 May 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He has advised Mr Ives to meet CT and Mr Grace at Durham en route to Haltwhistle; he discusses Mr Ives's travel arrangements from Northamptonshire and the need to coordinate with Mr Hollingsworth; sorry to hear Mrs CT is not well and warns CT about his health in the north and that “the burthern of labour in the College” will probably fall on the dean and CT; Mr Maughan's loss at Bamburgh will be much felt; he will deal with Mr Banford and Mr Baker as CT suggested.
Paper, 2f, damaged with some text lost
VML 118   25 May 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Seeks his opinion on an enclosed letter from Mr Piper, not very urgent; his nephew [Mr Ives] is aware of his obligations to CT and his advice, and Mr Ives's Bradden relatives are sorry to see him go; he hopes to hear of Mrs CT's improved health; he will send 100 copies of the speeches for distribution.
Paper, 2f
VML 119   1 June 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to[CT]
Passes on the sad news of the premature death of the talented bishop of Oxford which will leave his family “very, very ill provided for”; discusses Mrs Thorp at Harrogate and his travel plans to Auckland via Hereford; he will rely on CT's judgement over Mr Piper's proposals re removing the old chapel at Sadberge and building a new one; discusses the case of Mr Carr's curate wishing to return to Darlington as the bishop of Exeter refuses to ordain him yet so he cannot take up his intended parish in Cornwall.
Paper, 2f
VML 120   2 June 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Wishes to gainsay the newspaper reports of the death of the bishop of Gloucester; the marquis of Cleveland has announced Mr Thornhill's death and that he intends to present Revd S.W.D. Merest to Staindrop and Cockfield in his place, and that he wants a resident in the parish for the living of Middleton-in-Teesdale, so ruling out Mr Carr.
Paper, 2f
VML 121   10 June 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
CT's congratulations are misplaced as the offer [of being appointed bishop of Oxford] has been declined [by Gaisford] which means it may be offered to the less satisfactory dean of Westminster; glad he approves of Proctor whose letters dimissory should meet him at Cambridge; Dr Bandwell is setting about the matter of [Sadberge] chapel with spirit & with judgement and Piper is quite wrong about taking down the old chapel; WVM concurs over Etherley chapel and the Roman Catholic gentry; Townsend will support Mr Bankes who will also be supported by the government, indicative of their tactics towards their old friends and suppproters; hoping to hear good news of Mrs Thorp; discusses his plans for travelling to Hereford and then Harrogate “to sip nectar, & bathe in its odourous nectar”; he has just signed Mr Aislabie Proctor's letter dimissory.
Paper, 2f
VML 122   13 June 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to [CT]
Regrets Mr Minton has to give up at St John's; Lord Cleveland intends to appoint someone to Middleton[-in-Teesdale] who can reside there, in which case “Mr James might probably be set at liberty”; discusses candidates for the Assize sermon in Durham, Plumer will be on the continent, Strong not yet well settled in Sedgefield, Henry Liddell or Mr Perceval, and possibly Mr Yarker for Newcastle; Lady Barrington's absence abroad means the issue of the furniture at Sedgefield and Durham needs resolving which Mr Strong and Mr Gaisford respectively would readily take in its entirety but probably not if the best is removed; Mr Faber's report of Mr Davison's indisposition means that much important business “must stand still”; CT's generosity in opening his house to newcomers to the diocese must be costing him financially; he intends to journey to Oxford, Gloucester, Hereford and Harrogate.
Paper, 2f
VML 123   22 June 1829
Letter from WVM at Belmont to [CT]
Detained at Belmont (the home of Archdeacon Prosser) by the weather, but he is going to Worcester; he will excuse Mr Strong from the Assize sermon and will ask Mr Perceval, unless CT knows if Mr Liddell has ever done it; Archdeacon Prosser thinks that Lady B[arrington] will only want a small part of the furniture at Sedgefield and Durham for her house in Berkshire, so leaving plenty for her successors there; he will sort out Mr Waite when he gets to Auckland if CT can supply his immediate needs; after conferring with Archdeacon Prosser over Mr Brewster Sr, it would be best to provide for Sockburn [church] by some arrangement with Mr Fountain of Middleton St George or his curate Mr W. Clemention Clarke as he could hardly “ordain Mr Snowdon upon such a title”; he congratulates CT on starting on his house; the archdeacon's house is “delectable”; he offers good wishes to Mr Strong; they are journeying to Matlock and then Harrogate.
Paper, 2f
VML 124   27 June 1829
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is happy with his suggestion for Sockburn, if he could tell Mr Brewster why Mr Snowdon cannot be appointed; Mr Johnson ought to be told to nominate a fit person with a fair stipend, which WVM might be able to supplement as at Ebchester and Medomsley though he is wary of too many such precedents; he will ask Mr Perceval to do the Assize sermon at Durham and Mr Yarker that at Newcastle; Judge Park is disappointed that Justice Bayley is taking the [Durham] circuit with Justice Littledale; Mr Strong may require a non-residence licence as Lord Barrington has reported to him that Lady Barrington intends still to visit Sedgefield; he is glad Mrs Thorp is recovering in the Ryton air from Mr Richardson's report; CT will probably soon hear from WVM's nephew [Mr Ives] at Haltwhistle; he hopes CT will soon be at Ryton.
Paper, 2f, damaged by damp, faded
VML 125   12 July 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He did not realise CT was still at Durham; he hopes he might soon call to take over various matters; he arrived here on Thursday and has only seen the Fabers, and not Mr Dyke despite having forewarned him so WVM is both bishop and chaplain at present; Mr Ives is too busy with workmen to visit yet, WVM does not have “much confidence in his predecessor's gift of prophecy, & shall be very glad if the event verifies the prediction within a few hundreds”.
Paper, 2f
VML 126   29 August 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Outlines arrangements for next week's visit with his chaplains and Mr Gaisford to Gosforth House, Newcastle Mansion House, confirmation, Ravensworth Castle, Durham Castle, confirmation; he needs to know the programme; he would prefer to go in his carriage to St Nicholas [Newcastle] and avoid a procession; the Gaisfords have arrived; the weather causes concern for the harvest.
Paper, 2f
VML 127   22 October 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Sorry to hear from Dr Wellesley at Wynyard of CT's loss of their recently born little one; he is intending to go to Cumberland to stay with the Stanleys at Ponsonby Hall, so please write to there.
Paper, 2f
VML 128   4 November 1829
Letter from WVM at Ponsonby Hall to CT
He may stay with the bishop of Carlisle en route from the Stanleys to Auckland; he hopes to see CT at his visitation; he is glad to hear good news of Mrs Thorp.
Paper, 2f
VML 129   17 November 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses possibly meeting up when CT is at Durham; asks him to forward Mr Hollingsworth's papers; he is keen to resolve various matters, including Beltingham chapel and Mr Waite's affair, and he approves of Mr Carr of Darlington's proposal for a chapel at Cockerton, which CT can report to Lord Crewe's trustees; Mr Durell has reported that Dr Prosser is ill at Lichfield but intends to travel to Ferrybridge with a medical attendant to meet Dr Cooke; he eulogises the anniversary of Queen Elizabeth [I]'s accession “There were jewells too in those days & Protestantism was triumphant!”
Paper, 2f
VML 130   22 November 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Grateful for his letters, Mr Hollingsworth's papers and those from St John's Weardale; they will have two days to confer when they meet, possibilities discussed; he wishes Mrs Thorp was better.
Paper, 2f
VML 131   [? c.December 1829]
Letter [from CT to WVM]
(Part only) Concerning Mr Merest and the need for a resident curate, also the Barrington Fund, and burial ground within Tynemouth priory and the building's possible repair for worship for the garrison and local inhabitants.
Draft, much cancelling and interlineation.
Paper, 2f, damaged at the head and foot of the central crease with some text lost
VML 132   5 December 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Encloses two letters; he is inclined to accede to Mr Merest's proposal for two years on condition that when he is settled at Staindrop he should provide for a curate's residence at Cockfield; he knows nothing of Mrs Lowther's case and asks CT's opinion; encloses a £20 draft for the ? Academy of Arts; he is shocked at the death of their friend Lady Nicholl; he hopes Mrs Thorp improves.
Paper, 2f, damaged with part of the lower centre missing with some text lost, and now in two parts
VML 133   7 December 1829
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Advises him to continue as before re his “coal concern”; he should comply with Mr Merest's request, with the arrangement to last only for two years from Christmas next; he is happy to make a draft on Bishop Barrington's Fund to assist repairs to Mr Lowther's glebe house; Mr Faber will send CT a parcel of his speeches for distribution.
Paper, 2f, damaged with some holes and some text lost
VML 134-136   14 December 1829
Letter from J.W.D. Merest at Staindrop to CT at The College, Durham
Discussing costs of repairs to Cockfield [chapel] and building a new rectory house [at Staindrop], and the bishop's views on this and providing for a curate.
Paper, 3f, badly damaged by damp with substantial parts missing
VML 137   [?14 x 28 December 1829]
Letter from WVM [at Hanover Square] to CT
Discusses Mr Merest's case, postponing his repairs at Cockfield, and providing a curate, residing in a lodging in a farm house; also Hilton chapel; Dr Wellesely has not called; and Beltingham chapel; London is dull.
Paper, 2f, in two parts, badly damaged by damp with parts missing with text lost
VML 138   28 December 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to [CT]
He hopes that Mr Merest will not defer and discusses how his situation may be eased; he is sure that his venison was “well bestowed”; he enjoyed the anecdote of the “Copyist of the Speech”; the archdeacon's vis vitae is still in good force; he is not aware of the chapel in the archdeacon's parish, nor of any claim on him at Cockerton; he is happy to add to the chapter's donation for Whittonstall chapel, and the Church Building Society might support it, he is glad at its large number of free sittings; Lord Crewe's trustees will deserve the patronage at Sunderland if they mean to build entirely at their own cost; he wishes CT would head south for his health but only in good weather; there is a problem with small pox amongst his servants with one dying, but the rest have been vaccinated at the small pox hospital, “great blame is imputable to the Auckland Apothecary”.
Paper, 2f
VML 139   31 December 1829
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He has given him some more latitude re Mr Merest which is an old grievance; Dr Wellesley, who is now presumably in the north, conferred with WVM over Hylton chapel which he would allow to be a district chapel with a rent charge of £150 pa on the rectory of Bishopwearmouth, but no tithes, with patronage for life, if Mr Gray purchased, but CT should clarify with Wellesley; discusses the subdivision of large parishes in general; fears his nephew Mr Ives is causing problems at Haltwhistle in alienating Mr Hollingsworth and frustrating plans for Beltingham, WVM has failed to prevent “open hostilities” and will have to discuss it further with CT; Mr Strong reports of problems at Durham cathedral; WVM's household has given no fresh cause for alarm.
Paper, 2f, in two parts, faded
1830
VML 140   1 January 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Acknowledges his letter; hopes to hear better accounts of him; apprehensive about his stay in the north, especially hearing from Mr Strong of CT's officiating in [Durham] cathedral on Christmas Day and at the ordination, though his strength should increase he should be a “valetudinarian” rather than an invalid; discusses Mr Merest and he would consider reducing the curate's stipend if that would ensure his residence in the parish; as to Easington and Cockerton their venerable friend ought perhaps to do what he suggests but he is concerned as to who is to suggest it to him, it needs to be “a most confidential and influential friend”.
Paper, 2f
VML 141-143   5 January 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton
His wishes for CT's health stem from his own self-interest; it is now time “for closing the negotiations” with Mr Merest, who is not of “the most pliant materials”, he suggests CT gives him an ultimatum that he is allowed his proposed engagement with Mr Chester on the understanding that Chester or some other curate actually resides in Cockfield after 2 years, which should allow Mr Merest time to complete the work on his glebe house at Staindrop and make the glebe house at Cockfield “sufficient”, and there is to be no more discussion; he is trying to bring his young friend at Haltwhistle to a better spirit and a more discrete conduct as he is getting into bad company and does not answer his orders, especially re the Bounty Board and the chapel at Beltingham, as he has a poor opinion of Mr Hollingsworth, but WVM has given him a “sharp lecture” and told him to return his commission, completed with the names of Mr Bird of Chollerton or CT; he will probably hear tomorrow from Mr Ives but he hopes CT will join him in not publicising the dissatisfaction and vexation that has passed between them; he goes to Mongewell tomorrow until parliament meets; there is a complete thaw which he hopes will favour CT's “migration”.
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 144   8 January 1830
Letter from WVM at Mongewell House to CT at Ryton
Mr Ives has returned the commission which he has filled up with CT and Mr Bird as clergymen and Mr Pearson and Mr Lowe as laymen, and CT can add Mr Ord of Whitfield if he thinks fit; Mr Hollingsworth has not sent all his correspondence with Mr Ives which is a most painful concern to WVM who hopes that he may repair the breach with Hollingsworth and also WVM's nephew, the background to which WVM will disclose fully on another occasion, and meantime he just wants to get through the Beltingham affair; the weather is fine, and the house is in good order but he is not too well.
Paper, 1f, damaged with some text missing
VML 145   4 February 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He hopes that the recovery of his family will continue though the weather does not help; he had feared for CT's health when Mr Durell reported that CT had been at a chapter at Durham, which he hopes will not be repeated; he returned to town on Tuesday so avoiding the snow which will have frustrated those coming to parliament; he hopes Mr Ives will accept Mr Watson; Mr Blackett can read the service in the poor house but only as a temporary expedient; he is grieved to hear of Mr Belt's misfortune and he is happy to testify to “so valuable a friend of the Church”; two canonries are vacant at Christ Church [Oxford] as Dr Hay and Dr Pett have sadly died, he thinks that Coventry and Lichfield will get the vacant bishoprick and Mr Gelf will get Dr Hay's stall; he asks for CT's advice on the enclosed (no longer present) letter soliciting his support for a newspaper; Mr Clavering will be high sheriff for another year, and Justice Park has resigned the Northern Circuit.
Paper, 2f
VML 146   30 March 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He is exasperated by his nephew's “monstrous conduct”; he sees no hope of reconciliation, but has sent the correspondence to the nephew's brother in Northamptonshire who might have more luck and who had been prepared to go to Haltwhistle for a personal conference which WVM hopes he will postpone; he will consider what CT has sent re Beltingham and will await further communication before going to law; CT is quite right not to notice the latest outrage from Mr Ives; he has sent the South Shields letter to Mr Darrell for his official attention; his health is not improving but perhaps a visit to Mongewell will help; CT's own invalid must beware of “the treacherous smiles of Spring”.
Paper, 2f
VML 147-149   3 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton
WVM's health seems to be improving and Mr Copeland allows him to consider a journey to Mongewell, hoping to resume his habits fully at the end of the Easter recess; he discusses the Beltingham situation, that Mr Ives should be a party to the suit to prevent the citations taking effect and “he may influence Mr Pearson to offer some resistance on the part of Sir Edward B.”, but he expresses his fears that the parishioners may be incited to opposition by Mr Ives or “some of his sinister advisers”; he hopes Mr Ives's brother, en route to Haltwhistle, may be restrained; he discusses the further dispute between Mr Ives and Mr Hollingsworth over the endowment for Greenhead chapel which WVM does not consider of “serious consequence”; he is prepared to avoid an “open rupture” with his nephew, through the efforts of Mr Ives's brother and his cousin Mr Grant, which might prevent Mr Ives from “becoming almost an outcast from respectable society”; he thinks CT would be entitled to be excused from some duties for the sake of his health; he is sorry to hear of the depredations on his cellar at Durham; he hopes CT and his little girl will benefit from moving to Yorkshire when the weather allows.
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 150   10 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He is sorry not to have had another letter; he hopes that his nephew's brother's “good sense & good Xtian feeling” is having a good influence and might induce [Mr Ives] “to make reparation for what is past”; Mr Burrell has bungled proceedings but he hopes Mr Pearson will keep Sir Edward to the main point; he is grateful to CT for not communicating the full extent of Mr Ives's resistance; he reports Archdeacon Singleton's opinion of Beltingham as an “unendowed & ill-considered appendage” to Haltwhistle which Lord Wallace and Mr Davidson of Ridley Hall might be called upon to assist; the journey to Mongewell is off as Copeland enjoins “strict abstinence from exercise” so that he may be fit to travel north later.
Paper, 2f
VML 151-152   12 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
His health does not permit much travel at present, but he might drive 3 miles to look at a house; he is rather more hopeful of his nephew Mr Ives who has “so rashly prejudged Mr Hollingsworth” but he warns CT to be guarded in his correspondence with him; the weather is as hot as summer, but he is fearful that he might not reach Auckland, which deprivation could shorten his days; he hopes the Jews Bill will receive its death-blow if it gets to the Lords and CT might readily surmise how WVM might speak on the subject; he is glad CT is resorting to rest, as prescribed, which WVM affirms.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 153-154   14 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
His health is still improving though Copeland still prescribes rest; he does not intend a drive for at least a week; Sir Edward's disclaimer should strengthen their case but Mr Ives's concurrence is necessary for the Bounty Board to take cognizance of the matter; he hopes that Mr H[ollingsworth] will not write to him; he understood Archdeacon Singleton to mean that Beltingham chapel appertained to H[ollingsworth] as a duty and not a voluntary service; Mr Burder confirms that if Beltingham was a parochial church, that would decide the vicar's liability; he hopes that CT will accede to his nephew's wishes at Oxford as a D.D. would suit him; Mr Peter Penson has sent him his controversy with Mr Matheson about which WVM wishes “he had held his peace”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 155   16 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He presumes CT is en route to Hammerton Hall by his letter from Darlington; he could not afford CT's suggestion of Lord Durham's house at Wimbledon, as he needs something much humbler where he can “be unvisited & unobserved & breathe pure air”, Mrs van Mildert is looking at houses in Richmond but WVM is avoiding carriage exercise; Cornelius Ives reports that he and Mr Grant hope to bring WVM's “infatuated nephew to a better disposition” though WVM suggests that CT suspends encouraging Mr Ives to fulfil his engagement just yet; he cannot confirm the newspaper reports of the king's poor health.
Paper, 2f
VML 156-157   23 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He has received a contrite letter from Mr Ives to which he has replied by insisting on Ives making good the engagement of £30 pa chargeable on Beltingham vicarage, and his resuming the duty of the chapel until it becomes a district cure of souls; he suggests that CT awaits a possibly similar letter from Mr Ives before contacting him; he is concerned to hear of his bladder problem, and he urges him to take Richardson's advice and avoid carriage travel; public reports of the king improve but all may not be well; WVM has occasional slight returns of the haemorrhage which is to be expected until healed; Justice Park has offered his house at Merton where he will go shortly.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 158   27 April 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He is going to Merton soon; he is glad his nephew at Haltwhistle improves and hopes that both WVM and CT may “receive him again to our goodwill, although with diminished confidence”; he is excited by the forthcoming 8 mile journey which will probably bring on a haemorrhage again but he has been encouraged not to be too apprehensive.
Paper, 2f
VML 159   1 May 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He was disappointed by Mr Ives's letter to CT, “cold & dry in manner, & defective in matter” with no mention of resuming the duty at Beltingham chapel; he is still hopeful on the basis of Mr Ives's 20 April contrite letter which he quotes, but he reiterates his two conditions; he has arrived [?at Mongeham (despite the address)] refreshed by the change until he relapsed and he is now mournful of future prospects; the weather is hot then overcast; he is not clear on Tynemouth Burial Ground; he had corresponded with Lord Beresford and thought the government not much wrong; CT has not mentioned Cockerton.
Paper, 2f
VML 160-161   28 May 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
He is glad to hear of his better health; WVM has had “something like cholera morbus”; he still intends to journey north despite health concerns; he has confidence in the pure breezes of his terrace walk at Auckland and he will avoid public expedition, devoting the season “to quiet exclusion as the best chance of ever again becoming useful”; Archdeacon Prosser, en route to Belmont, discussed Cockerton and is not keen to throw it into the patronage of Raby Castle by making it a separate parish or district; he hopes CT will not carry out a Northumbrian visitation as the bishop of Carlisle has offered to carry out any confirmations or consecrations; Mr Burder will answer a letter just received from Mr Thompson at Egglestone about Mr Powell; WVM is happy for CT to deal with Stockton and its churchwardens; Mr Tyson has sent his pamphlet; Mr Penson has sent an additional batch of his controversy with Mr Matthieson which WVM is not enthusiastic about; he relies on CT re Beltingham; he will put forward [in parliament] CT's suggestion re the Archbishop's Tythe Composition Bill; he encloses a letter from Mr Green of Long Horsley and WVM's reply.
Enclosing the following.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 162-163   24 May 1830
Letter from R. Gum at Long Horsley near Morpeth to WVM
Pointing out the difference in the duty imposed on spirits in England and Scotland which has led to much smuggling along the border, so 5 or 6 years ago he got a memorial signed by clergy in Morpeth deanery sent to the chancellor of the Exchequer, but nothing was done to mitigate the evil and now the difference in duty is about to increase so perhaps the clergy in affected areas out to memorialize government on the subject, especially as a gentleman from the Treasury is in the neighbourhood investigating it, though he understands that the intention is not to equalise the duties but to increase the Excise establishment to suppress smuggling more effectively, the effect of which he is sceptical about as the profit on a horse and cart load of 50 or 60 gallons is considerable for a poor man, and the excise officers have an interest in permitting the practice; his view is supported by Mr Bigge, chairman of the Northumberland Bench, whose magistrates have also written to the Treasury, more in hope than expectation, but the similar support of the clergy might help, which could be mobilised at a forthcoming meeting of the Sons of the Clergy at Alnwick, for which the support and advice of WVM would be appreciated.
Including a copy of WVM's reply of 28 May declining to give an opinion, not least because of his poor health, but saying he will forward his letter to CT.
Paper, 3f
VML 164-165   9 June 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
He is glad of the news of CT and his doings; his own health improves and Copeland will allow him to travel north by carriage by easy stages, so he is intending to journey to Harrogate then Auckland; they have now left Judge Park's “agreeable retreat”; he hopes CT has satisfied the vicar of Newcastle re Benwell School, for which Mr Burder should prepare the licence; he cannot be expected to satisy the dean of Chester and his curate who he hopes will settle their differences; he hopes the Beltingham affair can reach the Bounty Board where he might put some other bishop in possession of the case; he has instructed his nephew's brother at Haltwhistle that the matter should pass entirely through the hands of CT, or Mr Burrell, or Mr Burder, rather than WVM; Mr Park, rector of Elwick Hall, will preach the Durham Assize sermon, and can CT recommend someone for the Newcastle one, except Mr Ives, and possibly Mr Darnell; Mr Gisburne's dispensation application has his approval; Mr Gaisford is postponing his Durham residence until after his boys' summer holiday; Mr Brewster may be comforted that his publications “are still called for”; the archdeacon has gone to Belmont; Strong is pleased that CT approves of his work at Sedgefield, but he failed to meet his wife in Paris whose health has delayed her in Switzerland; the king is in extremis.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 166   16 June 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to [CT]
Discusses the [Beltingham] issues, especially its consecration, he has presumed on the basis for burial fees, and hopes that Mr Ives's suggestions my be adopted without difficulty; discusses his travel plans to Harrogate; his health is somewhat improving; he is glad to see in the newspapers Mr C. Reed's promotion to Tynemouth and CT should secure his services for the Newcastle Assize sermon; he will discuss the other matters in person; Mr Strong is summoned to Paris as his wife is not well; he will keep Mr Bird's letter unless CT says otherwise.
Paper, 2f
VML 167   28 June 1830
Letter from WVM at Scarthing Moor Inn to CT
Reporting on his journey thus far, lingering at Witham, and suffering some relapse on the way.
Paper, 1f
VML 168   10 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is glad to hear of his health, and is hopeful for a summer after the wet and cold; he will put the Beltingham return before the Bounty Board, and involve the bishop of Carlisle; he is keen to get the full benefit of Mr Richardson's advice [at Harrogate] but is frustrated at not being able to perform his public duties in full; he hopes the electioneering will be over before he arrives as a contest for the county might embarrass him; he has advised Mr Ives to petition Lord Crewe's trustees.
Paper, 2f
VML 169   14 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Encloses letters from Mr Duncombe Shafto, who wants his son ordained at Durham by the bishop of Chester after examination by CT, presumably on the title of the curacy of Brancepeth, but it is all rather short notice, and Mr Dere Griffith, whose request WVM has no objection to except that the curacy might be better for one of their own clergy such as Mr Goldsmith of Hanhope, but CT can deal with it; Mr Longridge's and Mr Biddulph's matters can be postponed; they have moved lodgings and he continually hopes for improved health.
Paper, 2f
VML 170   15 July 1830
Letter from CT at Ryton to [WVM] (incomplete)
Suggesting St Andrew's ought to have a curate in full orders rather than Mr Griffith to support the ailing incumbent who has not recovered as hoped when WVM admitted Mr Reed, and postponing Mr Shaftoe's ordination until the regular time unless the parish's case is pressing; Mr Davison could give a good opinion of Mr Longridge as he knows Bedlingtonshire well.
Paper, 2f
VML 171   15 July [1830, or rather 1831 or 1832 or later]
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He will forward his letter to Mr Oyly who will be much obliged for his donation and offer of services to the institution; he is pleased to hear good news of CT from the bearer; he sends two statements for his opinion of London University as other matters engage him more agreeably at present; he also sends a packet from the vicar of Newcastle on which he will confer; he will call this morning.
Paper, 2f, faded and stained
VML 172   16 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He has advised Mr Duncombe Shafto that he will grant letters dimissory for his son to the bishop of Chester, so could CT examine him or send him to Mr Strong at Sedgefield; if Mr Griffith is not suitable, and the curacy is not of sufficient value for Mr Goldsmith, he would like to bring Mr Tay into the diocese, whose grandfather gave WVM a title for orders in Kent where he ran Ashford Grammar School, though Mr Tay would like to take pupils with a house fit for the purpose and is currently assistant-curate at his uncle's church in Hertfordshire, in somewhat straitened circumstances and worthy of a position at some stage; he has no bleeding at present, only a troublesome cough and he is fatigued by a quarter of an hour's movement, and “growing old very rapidly”; he instructs CT to take good care of his little girl “in these treacherous winds”.
Paper, 2f
VML 173   24 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
“Lord Crewe's trustees have done handsomely by Beltingham”, he has told Mr Ives and also that the Commissioners' report did not reach town in time and will now be presented to the Bounty Board in October, he has suggested to Mr Ives that he finds someone to nominate to the chapel, or the person that [CT] suggested may still be possible; he would like more details of the second master post at Durham Grammar School which he might suggest to Mr Say, who may also be interested in Mr Griffiths's curacy at Newcastle, though he has concerns about the financial situation of both and seeks CT's advice; he has not been well, but “Mr Richardson's attentions have been very unremitting & very satisfactory” and he hopes soon to go to Auckland.
Paper, 2f, damaged, a small part lost
VML 174    26 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Ryton (College cancelled)
He has lost his franking privilege for the moment so he has now to write without an envelope; he congratulates the Chapter on augmenting Berwick-upon-Tweed and wishes that “the Dignitaries of the Church” would similarly spontaneously act; Mr Ives has written “an angry, fretful, & personally offensive letter” in response to his which was “meant to be all kindness & goodwill”; his late bilious attack is subdued but he feels languid and feeble, though he should be able to go to Auckland; he asks to be reminded if he has appointed an assize preacher for Newcastle; he warns CT not to divide his sheet of paper as the Post Office will count it as two whole sheets.
Paper, 2f
VML 175   27 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He advises him not to divide his sheet of paper into two as he will incur double postage until he resumes his [franking] privilege; he does not think Mr Say will be suited by either position, or that at Beltingham; he will not write again to Mr Ives as he does not want “fresh ill usage”; he hopes to move to Auckland though his “whole frame is shattered” and he still has his “local malady”; the dean of Chester has been summoned [to London] to see the duke [of Wellington] re being appointed to a see.
Paper, 1f
VML 176   31 July 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He plans to move to Auckland as he feels sufficiently recovered; he hopes they may confer in assize week at Auckland, though he hopes [CT] will inform other friends and neighbours to leave him alone.
Paper, 1f
VML 177    6 August 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is still not well but “the air & repose of this sweet spot are very refreshing”; he hopes CT's young ones enjoy the sea breezes at Redcar; discusses arrangements for CT's possible visit; he encloses (no longer present) letters from three candidates for the under-mastership of Morpeth School and he asks CT to see them at Durham before the election on 12 [August] with which Plumer might help; he also encloses a letter from Mr Minton at St John's Weardale, and states that he needs certificates and testimonials from Mr Waite before his suspension can expire, and he hopes Mr Minton will not leave quite so soon as Mr Thompson of Heatherycleugh cannot take charge, even for only two months,but perhaps it can all wait for CT's visitation; Burder reports that the dean of Chester is to be a bishop but he does not know of which see; he hopes the [Durham] assizes go smoothly.
Paper, 2f
VML 178   18 August 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
The bishop of Carlisle is happy to “take any business” for him until 10 September and after 20 September, so he will suggest that the bishop takes any consecrations at Newcastle or Alnwick after visiting Auckland on 20/21 September, which CT might advise people of on his visitation, and the bishop might hold confirmations at Corfield, Morpeth, Newcastle, Alnwick and possibly Belford, and also, while at Auckland, at Barnard Castle, Darlington and Auckland; what is CT's opinion of all this?
Paper, 2f
VML 179   27 August 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is glad to hear good news of his visitation progress; he has not yet had a reply from the bishop of Carlisle; he has also suggested to the bishop of Bristol that he might hold an ordination and perhaps some confirmations for him.
Paper, 1f
VML 180   28 August 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He should by now have received a letter from Ryton; he would have met him in Durham if he had known he was there; he asks CT to come to Auckland to meet the bishop of Carlisle and to postpone going to Bamburgh; he is too weary to answer CT's letter.
PS He is expecting Gainford.
Paper, 1f
VML 181   2 September 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Mr Gainford is en route to Durham to enter his residency there; he hopes CT will bring him back with the bishop of Bristol for dinner though there will be no bed for CT and WVM may not appear as he has “a relapse of haemorrhage”.
PS He hopes CT and the bishop of Bristol can organise confirmations at Darlington, Stockton and Hartlepool; he hopes CT will visit in spite of his relapse and that he can organise Northumberland confirmations for the bishop of Carlisle to do as necessary.
Paper, 2f
VML 182   9 September 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He approves of his plans for confirmations by the bishops of Carlisle and Bristol, though Bristol might have appreciated more notice; Mr Burrell will attend both progresses and deal with the expenses on WVM's behalf, WVM will brief him; Mr Burder will attend for the ordination; he sends £60 from Bishop Barrington's Fund for dividing between Mr Tyson of Gateshead, Mr Hodgson of Kirkwhelpington and Mr Taylor of Hart though WVM is happy to write to them if CT would prefer; he asks CT to order from Mr Hodgson five copies of his History of Northumberland, three large and two small; he is not sure where to address this to; he is better now than he has been.
PS He seeks CT's and Mr Durrell's opinion about giving £30 a year from Bishop Barrington's Fund to Mr Waite re Medomsley and Ebchester.
Paper, 2f
VML 183-184   11 September 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Bamburgh Castle
Seeks his opinion on an enclosed (no longer present) “very extraordinary letter” from Mr Bates about a threatened publication intended to annoy WVM and Mr Hollingsworth,WVM recites his intended reply eschewing both any concern in the Ridley Hall estate and being a medium of communication between Mr Bates and Mr Hollingsworth; he hopes CT is the better for the Bamburgh sea breezes, WVM is refreshed by “airings in the open carriage”; he had not heard form the bishop of Carlisle; he hopes he has received a letter directed to Ryton as WVM was not aware that he had gone to Bamburgh.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 185   14 September 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
The bishop of Carlisle agrees to his plan [for ordinations] so he will write to Mr Darnell; he suggests that CT suggests to Mr Clark that the stipend for Medomsley and Ebchester be increased, with WVM's authorisation; he has not yet read Mr Bates's pamphlet, but he has espied eulogies on his nephew in contrast to his predecessor, and he is happy to send a copy to CT but not to Mr Hollingsworth; he has had another slight relapse, possibly brought on by letter writing, but he hopes for a gradual improvement; he is concerned at CT staying at Bamburgh “the bleakest of our bleak country”, “take care how you step out of your warm bath to encounter the gales around you”.
Paper, 2f
VML 186   16 September 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He hopes Mr Green may be “a useful & a more permanent pastor” for St John's [Chapel] than his predecessors; discusses the blunder of the Morpeth burgesses re their election and whether the bishop as visitor has power to intervene; he is not aware of a Sunday confirmation being uncanonical and discusses further the proposed confirmations by the bishop [of Carlisle], perhaps at Belford rather than Bamburgh, accompanied by Mr Plumer and Mr Burrell, and that he would write to Mr Darnell; he expects to be considered contumacious for not attending convocation at York though he has not yet had the papers; Mr Justice Park and family are staying, but he sees little of them as his daily relapses mean he has to be solitary and quiet.
PS Discusses the bishop [of Carlisle]'s possible stay at Ravensworth and whether or not he is acquainted with the family; he has still not opened Mr Bates's pamphlet; seeks CT's opinion on an enclosed letter from Mr Rennicott.
Paper, 2f
VML 187    20 September 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses arrangements for the bishop of Carlisle's [visits] to Norham, Wooler and Berwick, to be helped by the enclosed letter from Mr Darnell; he is glad that he makes “so light of Mr Bates's performance”, who will buy 2000 copies, who cares about Ridley Hall or his squabble with Mr Hollingsworth though he fears the latter cannot escape unscathed; he is better but still not well, yet Mr Clarke is optimistic; Mr Copeland comes shortly from Lancashire; he wishes CT was well away from Bamburgh.
PS Encloses a copy of his answer to Mr Rennicott.
Paper, 2f
VML 188   15 October 1830
Letter [from WVM] at Auckland Castle [to CT]
“... Brother Julius with him. This is hardly quite correct, & I shuld fear may prove inconvenient at the private houses where the Bishop ...”; he goes to London and then winter quarters in Roehampton; ?ailments.
Paper, 2f, lower part (the majority) torn away and missing
VML 189-190   18 October 1830
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Bamburgh Castle
Returns Mr Birkitt's letter, the lady's endowing the church or chapel on condition of perpetual presentation is “encroaching” and he is not sure if the patron Sir M.W. Ridley will approve, he queries the lady's religious views, and suggests burning the Wolf-Fish letter as he did the previous one; he will thank the bishop of Carlisle when he returns to Carlisle; he is sorry to hear that CT is shut out of [Ryton] rectory “by so ugly an intruder” and glad he can stay in Durham meantime; he leaves on Monday but is still not well; he is sorry to hear of the loss of Mr Broderick who seemed due for “speedy advancement”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 191   4 November 1830
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Asks him to deliver the enclosed, discusses the livings of Chillingham or Whelpington, possibly for Mr Davison, he needs to confer with CT, and on “an opening at Mitford for poor ...”.
Paper, 1f, damaged with most of the left side lost with text missing
VML 192    16 November 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He does not feel he can interfere over Mr James of Belford's distressing letter re seemingly “illegal usage” by Mr Clarke over the churchyard, but he suggests that the lay rector ought to have no return to enter upon vicarial premises, and can CT resolve the matter perhaps without going to law; he agrees that Dr Phillpotts ought “to withdraw his pretensions”, but he is happy to concur with what advice CT may offer him though WVM suspects that his reputation is too much at stake for him to “succumb”; he considers that the government might fall after their minority on the Civil List motion in the Commons last night, and he has no confidence in the “conflicting parties”, but rather in the “Power above”; write to Hanover Square.
Paper, 2f
VML 193   27 November 1830
Letter from WVM at Roehampton to CT
Sends a petition for him to sign as Official in the absence of Archdeacon Singleton whom he hopes will soon return to office; the marquis of Cleveland intends to nominate Mr Merest to Darlington, though the churchwardens have objected to such a non-resident which he has informed the marquis of, and if Merest is to be non-resident, two curates will be required; he speculates whether Lord [Henry Peter] Brougham [Lord Chancellor] will eat up all Mr Brougham's speeches or, “as Lord of the Woolsack ... devour us”.
Paper, 2f
VML 194-195   4 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Roehampton to CT at The College, Durham
He has four of his letters to answer, and is rather burdened with correspondence being unable to communicate in person as in London or Auckland; he is happy, with some reservations, for the patronage of Seaton chapel to go away from the mother church, so CT should send the preparatory papers to Mr Burden; he has written to Mr Clavering re difficulties with his proposed successor and he will put the young Clavering into the Commission of the Peace to make him useful; he will probably contribute something to Cockfield; the marquis of Cleveland has objected to his insistence on two curates at Darlington if Mr Merest is appointed, and to the locals' opposition, and Merest is quite entitled to demand his licence; he awaits CT's news on Belford, Mr Clarke and Mr James; he is very happy for Mr Snowdon to go to Grindon and to be replaced at Sockburn by Mr Raine but Mr Faber must inform the incumbent at Grindon of their intentions, as the arrangements need not happen immediately; he has no heart to consider political or ecclesiatical matters but hopes good may come out of evil and that he will attend to his duty; he hopes incendaries and sickness are past and is well apart from a cold.
PS Does he know of the petitioner in the enclosed and why he should apply to WVM rather than wealthy Newcastle neighbours; if CT supports it, he will remit £5.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 196   6 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Seeks his advice, and perhaps he can also enquire of Mr Clavering, Mr H. Liddell, Mr Collinson and Mr Baker, on whom to appoint as magistrates in the Northern Districts of Co Durham which the secretary of Lord Melbourne has just written to him about, pointing out that some are rather aged and infirm; he is hastening to Roehampton before dark.
Paper, 2f
VML 197   7 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Roehampton to CT at The College, Durham
He is happy for CT to carry out with Mr Faber the proposed arrangement for Grindon and Sockburn; he is also happy with Seaton chapel; enquires as to who has done the Spring Assize sermon since he came to the see, as he intends Mr Strong for the Summer Assizes; WVM, and Mrs Van Mildert, approve of CT's charge of which Rivingtons have sent printed copies; he is glad that CT is to be an acting magistrate and others need to come forward as well; Mr Langridge has written requesting that Mr Burden of Hartford House be appointed a magstrate for Bedlingtonshire which he dare not deny, and he needs CT's help to encourage the fittest to come forward.
Paper, 2f, damaged by molten wax
VML 198-199   7 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Roehampton to CT at The College, Durham
The bishop of Exeter elect intends to exchange Stanhope rectory for a stall at Durham, WVM encloses his reply which is confidential, but he fears this will not be the end of the matter and he may have to cooperate in the vacation of a stall, so would CT be prepared to exchange Ryton and his stall for Stanhope; he considers also removing Bishop Gray to Stanhope as a third bishop on the chapter “is much to be deprecated”; he hopes CT will tell no one of this until WVM makes it public.
Paper, 2f, + wrapper
VML 200-200A   11 December 1830
Letter from WVM at London to [CT]
He thinks CT is wise to decline the proposal; he is now sanctioned by Earl Grey to offer it to any other prebendary so he has written to Mr Darnell, though he does not expect he will take it; this is not to be discussed with others.
PS He will await further news of his enquiries re the Commission [of the Peace], but he will attend to his hints re Lords Durham and Cleveland and Mr Beaumont.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 201   13 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He is grateful for his efforts re new magistrates which he will report to the Home Secretary; he has made the offer to Mr Darnell and Lord Grey is happy for him to leave the matter to WVM; Bishop Gray or Phillpotts cannot be offered it, so he had thought of Mr Townsend and then Mr Gilly next but he will consider CT's suggestion; he is relieved that Mr Clavering is happy to continue as sheriff for a year; he finds he cannot insist on two curates at Darlington so he will require a stipend of £150 with the option of employing two curates rather than one for the same amount.
Paper, 2f
VML 202-203   14 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Roehampton to CT
He fears a relapse of his malady, being oppressed by drives to town and correspondence; he is rather confused by the magistracy issue as Mr Clavering has also sent a list; he needs one list with legible names and places, also it may not be a good idea to submit such names to Lord Durham or Lord Cleveland or Mr Beaumont as they may suggest others of whom he does not approve, such as Mr Clavering's suggestion of Lord Durham's steward; he does not think the mayors of corporate towns ought to go in as permanent magistrates as that would swell the list unduly as they are presumably ex officio magistrates during their officiality and the gentry of the County might not wish to be assoicated with them, and he has recently refused to put Mr Wolfe of Durham on the list; he considers that he has no jurisdiction in Newcastle which belongs to the Lord Lieutenant of Northumberland and that in the rest of the county only in Bedlingtonshire and North Durham are his palatinate rights acknowledged, but CT will overcome all such difficulties and so he awaits his final list; he sends £5 for Robert Nelson's wife and children to be entrusted to Mr Green for him to dispose of; he will advise Mr James to seek legal opinion before venturing hostilities with Mr Clark which is “a great hardship”; Mr Merest has been told he is to retain a curate for £150 which he can divide between two, which CT is to emphasise to him when he institutes him anew to Cockfield; WVM has been allowed to deal with the Stanhope exchange and he awaits Mr Darnell's “determination”.
Paper, 4f, damaged with parts missing and some text lost
VML 204   17 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He has sent his list [of magistrates] to General [Aylmer] for his opinion and hopes to expedite and complete the business, though Mr Burder is out of town.
Paper, 1f
VML 205   20 December 1830
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
The lord of Raby's humility in yielding precedency to WVM re Darlington amused him and he will consider humouring him and Mr Merest; General Aylmer and Mr Faber suggest Mr Chaytor and Mr William Clavering for the Commission of the Peace but WVM considers CT's list needs pruning, though his malady and severe cold preclude his dealing with the matter; he grieves at the loss of Mr Darnell from the Chapter though his family will benefit from Stanhope; he envies the Chapter's patronage of Norham.
PS The enclosed letter from Mr Faber is confidential; he is ashamed not to have enclosed the £5 note previously.
Paper, 2f
1832
VML 206-208   2 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
Grateful for the Chronicle though it does not help if he has to return it; he will leave Mr Watson's letter re Etherley to be answered by CT or Mr Burder when something definitive can be arranged; he discusses a possible general fast day for the cholera outbreak at Gateshead which the archbishop may be gazetting, he does not quite approve of what the bishop of Chester has permitted in his diocese, but WVM is happy for churches to be opened on weekdays for prayers and even a sermon to “deprecate the divine chastisements”, and he is glad to see the disease has not wrought panic but has been met with “equanimity & resolution”; he has had complimentary letters from the duke of Wellington, and Lords Lonsdale, Shaftesbury and Grenville re the proposed Durham College, but he would rather have a committee with CT on the matter than “distant & desultory communications”, and after parliament meets, it will be necessary “to come to closer quarters” though he cannot “bear the whole burthen”.
PS Seeks his advice on contributing to the Newcastle Board of Health, he could give £50 though he has “answered calls in the Palatinate” to around £300.
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 209-210   3 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
He would not have considered allowing the castle stables to be used for receiving cholera patients as it would be an annoyance for the Assizes and would bring infection into the castle which might be hard to eradicate, he would be happy to contribute to a pest house or lodging for vagrants or a burial place outside the town but the castle must not be used, he is grateful for the bishop of St Davids's offer to consecrate any such place, especially Etherley, though that must await the appointment of an incumbent; he will name Mr Tyler for Durham and Mr Beasley for Newcastle for the Spring Assize sermons though he does not know their addresses.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 211-213   5 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
The cholera news is not as favourable as hoped, it seems to be worse abroad, and London might soon be afflicted, he has told Mr Collinson and will tell Mr Faber that he can be called on for Gateshead or elsewhere, and he has directed £20 from Bishop [Barrington]'s fund for Mr Allason and he is happy to add £10 or £20 more himself if necessary; the Sons of the Clergy should not borrow, if CT can raise £30, he will add £50; his moneys are running out but, if needed, he can still provide some; he has written to the dean of Christ Church against burdening the professor's stall with charges not shared with the rest of the Chapter as, if this is resisted, some prebends might even be dissolved or at least reduced; he is keen to retain the readerships of law and medicine; there is an issue over calling the body a university on which Dr Tournay has given him “considerations of great weight”, which he will send to CT and the bishop of St Davids, and which he will confer about with the archbishop.
PS He delivered his letter to Mr Burder who will deal with it.
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 214-217   6 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
Encloses extracts of The Standard newspaper on the distinction between a university and a college being based on the power to grant degrees and faculties from a discussion at Trinity College Dublin, also letters from the bishop of Bath and Wells of 3 January in support of Dr Bland as professor of Mathematics, from Mr Joshua Watson offering to approach “a Mathematical Teacher of high promise”“shut out from the tutorage of his college (St John's) ... by the youth of the present tutors”, from Dr Tournay suggesting that if WVM taxes two stalls [at Durham], turning them “from sinecure Dignities into useful working offices” then [Lord] Grey may do the same with other stalls at Durham, St Paul's, Westminster etc, and suggests that the charter should provide for the return of allocated property to its original use should the university fall and that the dean and chapter should be able to dissolve the new institution which the charter should stipulate as a university with teaching in several faculties, especially Theology, otherwise “the London gang will be chartered as a university with power to confer degrees”, as stated by Sir Charles Wetherall and in books of high authority, but WVM has not been able to add his own views because of interruptions; the Easington bill needs to be recast by Mr Burder who is very conversant with such parliamentary business.
PS He returns the Durham paper which Mr Faber has done him a copy of, though it is worn and dirty.
Paper, 4f + wrapper
VML 218-220   7 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
He is pleased to hear of a house of reception now for patients, but hopes a permanent one may be established [for Durham], if it may not be too much of a burden on the inhabitants, and an additional cemetery is also needed permanently, and further preparations for future visiatations may require pest houses in “every populous town”, as there was for small pox before vaccination was known; Mr Faber will provide money on his behalf as necessary, and he encloses the following account; he also encloses the following letter from the earl of Clarendon which should be shown to the bishop of St Davids, which shows that there should be no shortage for the chair in Mathematics; he also encloses a letter (not present) from the dean of Christ Church which he hopes CT and his dean will treat as confidential; he is still undecided between Mr Le Bas and Mr Rose for the Divinity professorship or, failing them, Mr Greswell who might do for the Greek chair, or so might Mr Biscoe, who is recommended by Mr Gaisford, and an old friend has recommended his son, a rising tutor at Worcester College [Oxford], also for the Greek chair, though he may be too young; he would appreciate CT's opinion on all these matters as decisions must soon be made.
PS He thinks Ogilvie “might be an excellent person for our purpose” [as Greek professor] , which the archbishop might back up; Gaisford suggests titling it not professor of Greek but of Ancient Literature to avoid invidious comparisons with the Greek chairs at Oxford and Cambridge, neither of which is well endowed.
Paper, 3f + wrapper
VML 221   [7 January 1832]
Account by WVM of his expenditure on cholera in nine towns in the north-east.
Paper, 1f
VML 222-223   6 January 1832
Letter from [John Charles Villiers] earl of Clarendon at The Grove, Watford, to [WVM]
He apologises for intruding, but he encloses the following and testifies to the abilites of Dr Bland as tutor at St John's College Cambridge, and since his retirement, with which the master of the college, the dean of Ely, would concur, and he gives his good wishes for his health.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 224   3 January 1832
Letter from Revd Dr Bland at Ramsgate to Lord [Clarendon]
Asks if he will write a testimonial in his favour to the bishop [of Durham], seeking the post of professor of Mathematics at the chapter of Durham's university in Durham.
Paper, 2f
VML 225-226   10 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
He is glad the venison is so acceptable, but alarmed to hear of his house being a sort of hospital; he encloses the following testimonial from the bishop of Peterborough, so he is beginning “to think there cannot be a better candidate proposed”, though he means not to “intermeddle in the appointment”; CT still harps on degrees but there are difficulties, which he will discuss when the archbishop comes tomorrow; he apologises for being fretful as he is harassed; he is astonished that Southey wishes to relinquish his “literary ease” at his time of life, and they certainly take on his services; he is puzzled by his earlier reference to Mr Gilly having no disinclination to resign his stall; he will feel happier when the professors and tutors are settled but is nervous about the impending judgement of government and parliament; he hopes CT will be happy with the Easington bill; he expects in each of his letters to hear that the pestilence has reached Durham from which he wishes him good deliverance.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 227   9 January 1832
Letter from Herbert [Marsh] bishop of Peterborough at The Palace, Peterborough, to WVM
Testimonial about Dr Bland, recounting his academic career, Mathematics tutor at St John's College Cambridge, and having published in Mathematics and the gospels; also grateful for the bishop's excellent charge to the clergy of Durham diocese.
Paper, 2f
VML 228    27 January 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He cannot approve of Mr Pinson's proposal of a service in the Durham jury-room [in lieu of] the Galilee which had always given great satisfaction; he would be surprised if Mr Mark Ne[?] would accept Norton School; Mr Hawks should be advised of what they intend for Gateshead so that he fulfils his engagements before his living is augmented; Mr Griffith and Mr Price's regret at what has passed is almost more laudable than if they had not fallen into error; Miss Douglas has left and will be long absent, and WVM will soon be on the move so CT should open a correspondence with Mr Fielding, apprizing WVM of it before reaching a conclusion; he plans to travel to Harrogate, so they will now have to communicate in writing; there have been two or three cholera cases here and they must trust in “more than mortal protection”.
Paper, 2f
VML 229   8 March 1832
Letter from WVM at East Sheen to CT
Hopes he and Mrs Thorp are enjoying Hammerton Hall, the report from CT and his curate at Ryton and Newburn does him credit and shows that the pestilence has some benefits, he needs information to ensure dealing with Mr Clayton's letters does not infringe ecclesiastical regularity; he might be inclined to favour his chancellor's son, in holy orders, as an unknown correspondent has testified to him as an estimable person, though he generally tries to avoid such commitments; they will be in business with their two parliamentary matters after Easter when they must be prepared to work.
Paper, 2f
VML 230   26 March 1832
Letter from WVM at East Sheen to CT
Glad he is at headquarters though he should be entitled to his share of recreation; hopes CT and Mr Liddell can confer to their mutual benefit; Mr Norris of Hackney has asked if CT will be a steward at the SPCK anniversary on 15 May which should cost him no more than 5 guineas; WVM spoke in the House of Lords hoping to negative Lord Suffield's new clauses in the Plurality Bill and he hopes to attend the committee on it, though bearing in mind the motto “festina lente”.
Paper, 2f
VML 231-232   30 March 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton
Mr Burder does not anticipate problems with the bill so he hopes matters may conclude after Easter, and he leaves the choice between Ayton and Easington to CT and Mr Liddell; affixing the chapter seal to the chapter bill is a priority once the bill is printed and going to committee; the petition sent to the judges does not require sealing; he cannot understand Mr Gilly's views and how they might be effected by his giving up his prebend as CT has never explained them clearly; The Times has shown up the Durham chapter as great pluralists with CT cited as having 8 benefices, as detailed, and WVM shall soon expose this “egregious statement” in the Lords, though he needs to know the value of CT's Brecon prebend, as such lies must not be unrefuted.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 233-234   31 March 1832
Letter from WVM at East Sheen to CT at The College, Durham, enclosing the following.
Asks him to refute the Lanchester complaint about which he hopes to hear no more; encloses and discusses the following, as he does not want to committ himself to raising Clavering expectations by a kindness to the Barringtons as he is wary of “the utter hopelessness of extricating an inexperienced & heated mind from the trammels of Fanaticism when once fairly caught in them”, that is putting an inappropriate person in a post; he presumes Durham will find him, or it will be forwarded to Ryton or Hammerton.
PS What does he think of “my Lord of London”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 235   March 1832
Letter from Diana Clavering at Axwell Park to CT.
Her nephew Lowther Barrington has a living in the south of £50 pa but he is so earnest in his duties that her sister is concerned about his health and that “he has got into a knot of Methodists” who might turn his head, so a change of quarters might be beneficial but he does not want to trouble the bishop directly and so he asks CT “to feel his pulse” on this, or advise how else best to proceed.
Paper, 2f
VML 236-237   3 April 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Hammerton Hall, Boroughbridge
Reporting hs explanation of CT's pluralities in the Lords, reducing them to 2, which was well received, except that Lord King objected, but then Lord Grey supported WVM and further commended CT; he hopes to expedite the Etherley chapel affair once they have seen Mr Davison, though documents will have to be redrawn if it is in the parish of St Andrew's Auckland; he is vexed that the pitmen are again “refractory”.
PS Reports “a capital petition” from Oxford University against the Reform Bill which Lord Bathurst is to present as Lord Grenville, who has “intense” feelings on the subject, is ill, so this may help “keep some of our Bench steady”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 238-239   10 April 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Hammerton Hall, Borougbridge
Shildon must be put in hand immediately and Mr Fielding has set up subscriptions for a chapel and school, to which WVM is happy to contribute; he is also happy to support whatever CT does on it; Etherley chapel can be licensed forthwith, with other arrangements to be completed before its consecration, and WVM will confer with Mr Davison re giving it a good endowment and an adequate stipend for the incumbent; he is also keen on the separations of Jarrow and Heworth, and Esh and Satley but the same incumbent cannot hold both livings so Mr Hodgson will have to resign Jarrow or Heworth to become tenable with Kirk Whelpington; re Mr Leadbitter's letter, WVM is not keen to remit a fine for an offence of the sort for which William Hedley has been convicted, and his own tenderness is less likely to stand in the way of rigorous justice as the fines usually go to some county charity; he has spoken against the Reform Bill, and appointed the bishop of Carlisle as his proxy in case he does not feel up to voting; Mrs VM “daily takes the office of Ranger either in Hyde Park or Richmond”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 240   19 April 1832
Letter from WVM at East Sheen to CT
He will send Mr Tiffin's letter and CT's answer to Mr Burder to obtain an opinion if necessary as there seem to be insuperable difficulties with it.
PS Asks if CT knows of the young man to whom Mr James wishes to give a title for orders, and does he know why Mr Dinning wishes to give up Belford curacy; he does not entirely approve of Mr James's way of “supplying young Gentlemen with Titles for Orders”.
Paper, 2f, damaged by damp
VML 241-242   21 April 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton (The College, Durham, cancelled)
Discusses Mr Burder's note on the case sent him which might be dealt with by provisions in “the old Marriage Act”; he fears the University Bill will not be sealed next week; Mr Burder reports Lord Durham's opposition to both the Easington and University bills to the poitn of a “deadly hatred”; looking forward to moving north.
Paper, 2f, damaged by damp, + wrapper
VML 243-246   25 April 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton and The College, Durham (both cancelled)
Sympathises with his private griefs; he has told Mr James to send Mr Orde's papers for ordination to WVM but he needs some satisfactory information about Mr Dinning's removal s he not keen on young men taking a curacy merely as a title for orders and ten quitting it; Mr Burder reports that the Univrsity Bill is at Durham ad so should be sealed this week; looking forward to his arrival in town; not many bishops at the anniversary Episcopal dinner at Lambeth Palace which he went to, despite a previous sharp relapse of his malady which affect his ability to do all he might wish in this busy session of parliament.
PS Burder reports that the printed bill s at Durham to be sealed; as CT should now have the licence for opening Etherley chapel, divine services should now start though Mr Faber makes some unpleasant remarks on the subject; asks him to thank Mr Clavering for the copies of Mr Wardle's excellent fast-day sermon as that would save him a letter.
Paper, 3f + wrapper (in 2 parts)
VML 247   26 April 1832
Letter from WVM at East Sheen to CT
Refutes any suggestion of sinister imputation against CT over Easington, whether he relinquishes that or Ryton, and he defies “the malice of any Lord or Commoner to peck a hole in your Gown or Cassock on that score”; he will discuss Mr Liddell, Mr Wardle and Mr Rawes when they meet; a charter is prepared for the London University to which the “Keeper of the Royal Conscience” should have no scruple in affixing the great seal which may have been quickened by the expectation of a similar grant for Durham, this does not bode well for Durham unless Oxford and Cambridge can interpose though this is not likely to be feasible.
Paper, 2f
VML 248   4 May 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Discusses the timetabling of the second reading to accommodate Lord Durham's wishes, whom Lord Shaftesbury does not think will be particularly hostile and they have plenty of powerful friends; would he like to dine next Thursday?
PS Is the dean in town to assist if not lead “in our battle”.
Paper, 2f
VML 249    28 May 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Thorp Green, Boroughbridge (Ryton cancelled)
Hopes he is well despite “the mournful occasion” of his journey; reports the king's lengthy response, supporting the Church, to the archbshop's address on his birthday; his hand is injured so his penmanship is affected; hopes CT will procure a more detailed statement of Whickham's income and outgoings from Mr Liddell; “do not forget our University Charter”.
Paper, 1f
VML 250   [?June 1832]
Letter from WVM to CT
Invites him to accompany him to Lambeth Palace to present him to the archbishop [of Canterbury].
Paper, 1f
VML 251   2 June 1832
Letter from WVM to CT
His report encourages the hope that CT's fears may yet be dispelled; has been organising a good show of temporal peers to support them in comittee, and he has to present a petition from South Shields lessees to the Lords in favour of the bill which will help to counter Lord Durham; CT is “pursuing the only proper course with the late archdeacon”.
Paper, 2f
VML 252   7 June 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
His bulletin this morning is encouraging; he knows nothing of an enclosed letter; Sir Charles Wetherell, Sir R. Harry Inlgis and Mr Lewis Knight dined with him yesterday promising zealous support for the university bill, and he hopes to see Sir James Scarlett again, so once their fate in the Commons is determined he will leave for Harrogate; the charter is not yet arrived from Mr Walters but they can take their time over it as it is not possible to open the university this year; his nephew Harry Douglas comes to town next week whom WVM would like CT to meet and tell him more about Whickham if there are more particulars from Mr Liddell.
PS Hopes CT might dine with him next week with Lord Shaftesbury, Kenyon, Wallace etc.
Paper, 2f
VML 253-255   8 June 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Thorp Green, Boroughbridge
Sir James Scarlett has been apprized of the bill by WVM, and [the bishops of] St Davids, Bristol and Exeter, WM will view its third reading in the Lords; the archdeaconry bill is through its Commons committee and should soon have its third reading, “passing sub silentio” as there is no public interest; hoping soon to retreat from “London turmoils”; the bloody scenes in Paris may come to London, but good has triumphed over evil in Berkshire.
PS The University Bill has passed its third reading and now goes to the Commons, Lord Durham had assured WVM beforehand that he had nothing to say; written in the robing room at the Lords.
Paper, 3f + wrapper
VML 256    18 June 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He cannot attend the Church Building meeting but CT's presence should be sufficient and he better knows the South Shields situation, and has his backing to expedite the matter; he can receive CT for a report after 2pm.
Paper, 2f, part torn away and missing
VML 257   4 July 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Awaits news from him, hopes he is now at Thorp Green and that his invalid is improving, and sends the enclosed there.
Paper, 1f
VML 258   6 July 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Discusses the letter from Mr Benson at Haltwhistle whose application he will mention to the Lord Crewe trustees whom he hopes will comply with it, but if not he will add to Mr Hollingsworth's benefaction himself, especially as Greenhead is so insufficiently endowed, or perhaps he might contribute a sufficient sum for the Bounty Board with the Lord Crewe Trustees to contribute £100 in addition to £100 from Bishop [Barrington]'s fund; they can confer and clarify; he hopes Mrs Thorp bears the journey well in this cool weather.
Paper, 2f
VML 259-260   16 July 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Ryton
He is hoping to confer with him after going to Auckland on Friday; Mr Newby is soliciting for the now vacant Coniscliffe and WVM is wearying of his importunities on every vacancy, but can CT give him the details of the living for which he already has various applications; Mr Baker's letter confirms that something must be done to allay “the desire of some novel distribution of Church Revenues” amongst the clergy, to safeguard Church property and the vested interests of existing institutions.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 261   17 July 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
His answer to Mr Thurlow is just what it ought to be but something more may be needed “to allay the feverishness of our Clerical Brethren”; Archdeacon Singleton has similarly dealt with Mr Thurlow; he is glad to have two such competent archdeacons but he needs to confer with both of them on this at Auckland.
PS He will return Mr Thurlow's letter anon but now sends a letter from Joshua Watson.
Paper, 2f
VML 262   19 July 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Mr Hawks's letter “savours abundantly of self-conceit & a pragmatical spirit” and Mr Gamlen's inclines WVM to confer the suggested office on him if it does not encourage him too much to think that further advancement might be forthcoming; the appointment of rural deans may at present be impolitic; he discusses possible candidates for Coniscliffe, including Mr Clementson of Middleton St George and Mr Newby which latter WVM inclines towards after his schoolmaster service and expectations at Witton le Wear; he has sent part of the household to Auckland and will follow tomorrow.
Paper, 2f
VML 263-264   26 July 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton (The College, Durham cancelled)
Mr Cundill accepted Coniscliffe before leaving Auckland last night; he has offered Stockton to Mr Newby who may well decline it and has assurd that he will make no further solicitations; he would like to avoid having to send refusals re Coniscliffe to the other [candidates] Arrowsmith, Proctor, Clementson and Grenside; hopes he flourishes as on his visitations, and his daughter does also; Mr Newby admired CT's after dinner speech which would be good as an appendix to his charge.
PS Hopes he can dine at Durham Castle to meet the preacher.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 265-266   2 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
Keen to have a letter from him; hopes he will appreciate some venison brought by the bearer as he has guests at Ryton.
PS The venison was killed last Monday.
Wrapper endorsed “The Resignation of Easington”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 267   2 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He has just sent him a note which he might have been spared had his arrived sooner; thanks him for coming to a decision [to resign Easington], so “purely disinterested”; he “cannot augur so confidently” re the contemplated chapel at Haswell as WVM is disinclined to press upon Mr Liddell such a diminution of the value of his preferment exchange; he is not clear as to how CT's resignation is to happen so soon, unless Mr Burder had been forewarned; wishing him many happy years amongst “a flock so endeared to you”.
Paper, 2f
VML 268-269   8 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
Mr Burder has forwarded the papers for CT's resignation from Easington, and Mr Liddell's and Mr Douglas's collations to Easington and Whickham; he doubts that CT needs to be collated afresh to Ryton as he is already rector; he is in a painful predicament now at having to communicate the final decision to Mr Liddell as he had thought CT would have done so, but he will do it instantly; he cannot cope with fresh uneasiness as the local irritation has pressed on him grievously recently so he is apprehensive about the forthcoming festivities and hopes that goodwill can be restored between the parties as before; hopes he will come for either of the public days, but not to stay as the bishop of Carlisle and two daughters visit, with he hopes Lord Wallace and WVM's nephew Henry Douglas.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 270   21 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Blames a harassed state of body and mind for overlooking his wish to give Mr Blenkinsop a title for orders as CT's second curate, which he is happy to do; he has had a bad cough, and great disorder in the stomach, bladder and urethra, which baffle his osculapius and indicate his general debility and decay; [George] Lord Kenyon and daughter are still staying as their maid servant is ill but he much enjoys Lord Kenyon's society; he may soon abscond to Harrogate and deal with the diocese by proxy; he wishes him well for his duties in North Durham.
Paper, 2f
VML 271-272   25 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
Lord Kenyon is delighted with his report from Belford; his cough is worse and his digestive organs are in sad disorder, with Clarke “trying to patch up the crazy machine as well as he can”; Lord Kenyon leaves on Monday, Judge Park and his son Waldegrave come today, they are all very considerate; hopes to see him at Auckland when possible.
PS Wishes to confer on ordinations, should he send them to Carlisle as he will hardly have more than three or four candidates; he is unlikely to be able to consecrate Haswell, or any other chapel, this season.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 273   31 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is still ill and now has a blister on his chest which may help the irritation but he has little confidence left in medicine; he is inclined to fix ordinations for 7 October, and consecrations will have to be postponed if CT could so inform the vicar of Newcastle re Benwell; he explains his reasons for not now sending ordinands to Carlisle; he hopes he will soon publish his charge and he wishes he would consider, as the Scots have done, producing a larger work on Establishments which he will help with if he revives; he presently has to refrain from talking and cannot read nor write; Lord Kenyon left on Monday and Mr Stabley has arrived.
?Enclosing the following.
Paper, 2f, some staining
VML 274   30 August 1832
Letter from J. Hackthorpe at Auckland Castle to CT
Asking for a bed on Thursday night after the Sons of Clergy [meeting]; WVM is not well but it seems “he is more nervous about himself than seriously indisposed”, though his loss would be a blow to the Church under which it would stagger if not fall into the dust, as a “radical Dog” may follow him as bishop as the new university is in progress.
Paper, 2f
VML 275    31 August 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Mr Blenkinsopp's ordination papers seem to be correct, though he had thought that Mr Wardle was to go to Winlaton and to be replaced at Ryton by Blenkinsopp; he is in a “sad plight” and “can hardly get through what is before” him.
Paper, 1f
VML 276   20 September 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Forwards a letter from Newcastle for his opinion; he is not clear if the committee wants him now or in the future, but he seems to recall some mismanagement of the committee's formation with its public meeting not being what he could sanction, on which they should confer at some stage; the large confirmation at Chester-le-Street fatigued him
PS Asks him to thank Mr Belt for his letter which he will attend to when he can.
Paper, 2f, damaged by damp
VML 277   27 September 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses when CT should visit; seeks his opinion on whether candidates for orders should take the oaths before WVM or the bishop who actually ordains them, WVM needs to be reminded how the bishop of Bristol did it for him [in 1830]; Henry Douglas is detained at Newland by illness, but the Liddells are ready for his reception at Whickham; he hopes he may be able to provide some Auckland provender for the young divines at ordination in The College, but not venison which is over, Goodson has his orders.
Paper, 2f
VML 278-279   29 September 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT to Ryton
“Mr Newby's morceau was a very pleasant relish to” his breakfast, “redolent of good sense, fine spirt & sound pirnciple, & Mr Wardell may be well pleased with the mistake that brought it forth”; the short introductions in the Durham Advertiser and Newcastle Journal to the letter to Sandford are perfect and invulnerable to attack; Archdeacon Singleton writes from Alnwick that he will stay before going to Newcastle for the consecration of Benwell chapel on 8 [October] by the bishop of Bristol, who is very generous and he hopes will accept some additions to the table without offence to him or Mrs Grey; care must be taken not to offend Mr Thurlow and to make him a precedent; he will look out his ordination charge but it will have no bearing on the present aspect of Church affairs; he will show him and Archdeacon Singleton a letter from the dean of Christ Church on reforms and deans and chapters; sends a letter from Chancellor Baker on an unpleasant subject which he does not how to deal with as he does not wish to offend Mr Barrington or Mr Davison but perhaps a certificate of fitness is necessary from Mr Davson; when is he coming?
PS He has now talked over with Mr Davison the matter of his son's appointment.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 280   1 October 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Happy to contribute half the sum for the young scholar for Corpus [Christi College Oxford]; happy to assist the editor of the Durham Advertiser but does not want any [?publicity].
PS Remind him about horses for the bishop of Bristol; he consents to Mr Haigh engaging Mr Armstrong as his curate at Wooler.
Paper, 2f
VML 281   6 October 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses a document which he found this morning “which may prove useful in the details of our University Plan” and which is “a curious & valuable memorial” of his friend who was “et decus et tutamen Ecclesiae nostrae”.
Paper, 2f
VML 282   15 October 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Keen to hear of his arrival at Bamburgh; they had a good journey to Harrogate but he is still suffering except the cough has subsided; Mr Thompson is to resign the Grammar School at Auckland, so he would be grateful for CT's advice on Mr Say - he has doubts - or the Norton schoolmaster, as someone is needed to bring the school “into repute” again and who might be an assistant curate to Mr Fielding who labours too greatly; animosities are raging at Bedlington and Mr Longridge has produced a pamphlet which will not help calm matters.
Paper, 2f
VML 283   20 October 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is “worried beyond expression” by the growing weight of correspondence; Mr Parker of Norton reports the deplorable state of the school's affairs and wishes to resign, so WVM has asked Mr Plumer to discuss with CT how to improve matters, with WVM happy to contribute £100 and to to concur with whatever CT can devise; he will deal with CT's official's letter later when he has been able to decipher the corss-writing which practice he deplores; he discusses the possible candidates for Auckland School, namely Mr Say, Mr Parker and Mr Rapier which last might be better left at Morpeth; his health is not improving and Richardson and Clarke cannot assist; his nephew H[enry] Douglas writes cheerily from Whickham which he would like to visit.
Paper, 2f
VML 284   26 October [1832]
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Encloses (no longer present) a letter from Mr Brown and WVM's answer handing over the matter to CT, such oratories are likley to cause some trouble unless than they can be put under some general regulations which Burder has been at work on consulting Dr Lushington, but he objects to the school and chapel being united and to Mr Carpendale being appointed to it as he is “full of whimsies & irregularities” and is only a deacon, albeit advanced in years, and he also disapproves of the “scanty”“measure of duty” proposed by Mr Brown; he also leaves the Norton School matter to CT and Plumer but Mr Parker should not expect to be ordained a priest; Mr Rapier might do well at Auckland if it is right to move him from Morpeth, WVM will forward Mr Faber's statement on Auckland separately; the Auckland St Helen issue should prosper in the hands of CT and Mr Gamlin with Davison trying to buy land accordingly; CT needs to show some demonstrations of progress re the university otherwise the chapter will fall into disrepute, and WVM is happy to pay his contribution to the “outfit” and “the annual sum” whenever required, so he can pledge him for £2000 by Christmas; it is unwise to oppose any Ecclesiastical Commissioners' queries; Earl Grey has opened the subject of Church reform with the archbishop but do not mention it.
Paper, 2f
VML 285   27 October 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
He omitted sending [the previous letter] yesterday, and failed to thank in for the invite to Ryton if H. Douglas could not accommodate him, but he had rather hoped to stay at Whickham.
Paper, 1f
VML 286   5 November 1832
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT [at Bamburgh Castle]
Congratulates him on his enclosed (no longer present) charge which, with that of the archbishop, which he also commends, should set clergy minds at rest and “end foolish & crude speculations”; he has a letter from the archbishop this morning with no new information about the government's views on the Church except that it looks as if the dissenters will first get exemption from church rates, potentially decisive against the Church being a national establishment, though the government's views on this or tithes are not clear, and Lord Brougham is so much indisposed; he presumes that the death of Andrews the bookseller has prevented copies of CT's charges from reaching him; as CT suggests he will send £50 to Mr Durell; he returns to Auckland on Thursday; when does CT leave Bamburgh, if he comes to Durham he could meet Henry Douglas when he comes to Auckland.
Paper, 2f
VML 287   9 November 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT [at Ryton]
He hopes this finds him well at “dulce domum”; he expects his nephew [Henry Douglas] from Whickham and Mr and Mrs Keith Douglas, “a right conservative M.P. with much good sense and many attainments”, from Fifeshire and he hopes CT might dine and meet them.
PS encloses documents for signing.
Paper, 2f
VML 288   10 November 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I thank you for another letter recd this morning - but hoping to hear from you again tomorrow, I shd not now write, but that I wish you to know that Mr Keith Douglas will stay with us till after Monday. It will give us much pleasure to see you on that day & I hope you will come. But I do not press it, to your inconvenience. I find that the consecration of Hetton Chapel is fixed for Thursday the 15th & I presume you will be there. Mr Dyke is writing to the Bishop of Bristol, to say that he will attend. I grieve for the spirit you describe as prevailing among some of our own body respecting the Church. If it spreads, actum est de Eccelsia ipsa, as far as relates to this country. Yet I will hope for better things - nor can I guess to what particular instance of this spirit you can just now advert. Dyke tells me however that in Yorkshire your charge is made a subject of animadversion, chiefly with reference to your intimating (as it is apprehended) some design of giving authority to Deans & Chapters over the parochial clergy. This, I trust, must be mere misapprehension. ”
Paper, 2f
VML 289-290   19 November 1832
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
“I am sorry to inform you that I must set out for London in the course of next week, & must have some conversation with you before my departure. Mr Clavering has proposed to dine with me this week, & I have named Friday for the purpose. I hope you will be able to meet him here on that day, & if you can come early we may have an hour or two in the morning to talk over divers weighty matters for your private ear; & we shall have a bed ready for you. After that day, we dismantle our apartments & send off part of our household & consequently can receive no more visitors. By the same messenger that carries this, I send also a note to the Bp of Bristol requesting him to consecrate Etherley Chapel for me on Saturday in this week & to dine & sleep here too on Friday. If he can do me this kindness, I must request you to give the necessary directions to the Deputy Registrar, to have everything in readiness for the purpose, & to be in attendance at Etherley at such hour on Saturday as the Bishop of Bristol may appoint. I postpone other matters until we meet. PS My messenger will wait your answer, & it may save time & trouble, if you can let me know the Bp of Bristol's determination. But do not detain my messenger longer than you can help, that he may get home again before nightfall. Mrs Van Mildert troubles you with the inclosed note for Mrs Durell. ”
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 291   8 December 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
“We arrived here last night, but I had been wretchedly ill upon the road for the last two days, & was obliged instantly on my arrival to call in medical aid. Though somewhat relieved this morning I am wholly unfit for business. You will soon hear, however, that I have executed some preliminary documents towards the nine augmentations we contemplate. Burder sends them to Faber this evening, & they ought to be forthwith forwarded to you, that we may have something more than verbal pledges to produce. Alwinton seems a miserly poor concern. Mr Bainbridge of Rothbury School has applied for it. But he has neither earned it by length of service, nor can it, I shd suppose, recompense him for giving up the school - which of course I shd require. I need not answer the letter yet, if at all. I must be firm with Mr Hawks of Gateshead Fell; & he shd be made aware of this. I have not engaged the preachers for the Spring Assize. If you will do it for me, it will be a great kindness - Mr Newby for Durham & I forget whom for Newcastle. I am sorry the good Bishop of Bristol cannot attend our Conclave. Bangor too is prevented, & I fear I am destined to meet hardly any in whom I can repose confidence. I am sure it will be a fruitless business, if not a ?mischievous one. And as to myself, I am such a broken reed to trust to, that I might stay away than have my mind harassed and embittered by conflicts in which I expect such a preponderance against me. You look to be also for the University. Alas! alas! That one concern has already so impaired all my mental and physical resources that much more of it must inevitably put an end to me as a public man - You know not the extent of my sufferings, nor the perceptibly rapid diminution of my vital powers. I know them myself & when I speak of them to my medical advisers, they hardly venture to question it. Nevertheless, while there is life, there is hope.”
Paper, 2f
VML 292   11 December 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“Lord Londonderry reminds me that I stand pledged to the last moiety of a certain sum (£500) for a certain purpose of which I believe you are cognizant being yourself to some extent or other similarly pledged together with other members of your Chapter. Having made it an express condition that my name should not be brought forward, I sent the first moiety to Lord L. himself, to make its way to the parties concerned - &, as he is not now in England, I hope you will not object to my sending the other moiety to you in Bank Notes or Port Bills, as soon as I can conveniently do so, which I hope will be as soon as they can go free of postage, i.e. about the 20th of this month. In the meanwhile, you will let me know whether you will undertake this weighty charge for me. Through the medium of your Chapter Clerk, I apprehend it will reach its destination without further trouble. I make but very slow advance towards convalescence, notwithstanding that, by good fortune, I have my Harrogate friend Richardson at hand, who comes daily to see and prescribe for me. The attempt I suppose I must make to take part in this Thursday's conference, will most probably overset me & undo everything. It is not the local malady (though that is still distressing) but such a general effect, from internal cold, on the whole vital system, as I hardly ever before experienced. I can write no more. The taking a pen in hand is quite a burthen - & an hour's conversation with the Dn of St Asaph has exhausted me. I have not yet seen the archbishop. Let me know the result of the Nominations and of the Elections of N & S Durham. ”
Paper, 2f
VML 293   20 December 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“Let me know that this comes safe to hand. I remit the £250 which you will know how to dispose of, & thank you for anticipating its arrival. I will write in a day or two to Mr Faber, to know whether he is prepared to pass the £1000 through Mr Chayter for the University. If not, I will make arrangements for it with Messrs Coutts & Co. I must take a short time to consider about Alwinton. Archdeacon Singleton mentions Stubbs of Greystead, Wood of Ingram & Manisty Junr as persons who might be fit for it - especially the two last. I fear that neither Dobson nor Housby are quite competent to it. The Archdeacon mentions also Mr Clark of Byrness but says he is “shy” & “not a Graduate”. What do you predicate of Mr Wood? - I should be glad to take a recommendation from Archdn Singleton, if you know no reason for disapproving. But let me have your free opinion & mention any others that may occur to you. A choice from among Northumberland Curates I shd think desirable. The Elections fill me with dismay. We seem doomed to suffer the lash of Whig domination for an incalculable length of time. Mrs V.M. has been exceedingly indisposed and has ?passed the same serious apprehensions but, (thank God) I trust is now doing well. I am better myself but still very susceptible of cold, & have suffered this morning from a drive into the city - which always distresses me more than a whole day's journey in the country. Excuse much haste. ”
Paper, 2f
VML 294   22 December 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“Your letter yesterday was indeed very disheartening, & I am prepared to hear little better tidings of Northumberland & South Durham. In some Counties, however, a noble & successful stand has been made. Yet there must be an overwhelming majority in the new Parliament of destructives of some kind or other. More personally I feel the alarming account you give of the High Sheriff, & I shall be most anxious to know the result. In any case, his office will be almost immediately vacated, & I shall be greatly obliged if you can suggest two or three names likely & fit to undertake the charge. The High Sheriff himself named one or two to me & I think Mr Wilkinson (is that the name?) of Coxhoe was one. He also seemed to think that Mr Thos Liddell might like to serve - but I hardly think he has weight enough, or any experience in such matters. Would Mr Mills be an acceptable person? Or Mr Surtees of Mainsforth, or Coll Grey or Mr Cartwright of Norton? - This last, perhaps, may be too much of an ultra Tory, & a favourite at Wynyard, to be well received. Pray turn these matters in your thoughts, & at your convenience let me profit by your suggestions. Mrs V.M. I hope is daily gaining ground. I am myself much at my usual pitch ... ”
Paper, 2f
VML 295-296   29 December 1832
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
“I owe you acknowledgements for 2 or 3 letters, which I should not have been so long delayed had I not, as usual, been much pressed with matters of more immediate urgency. My first contribution of £1000 to the Durham University has been placed to Mr Chaytor's acct by my Bankers Messrs Coutts & Co & he has written to acknowledge their communication. The other £1000 will follow, I hope, very soon, either through Coutts's hands or Faber's. My acct with Coutts would have been considerably overdrawn, had I remitted at the same time with the others. You will not be surprised at this, when I tell you (for your private ear) that this year's contributions, public & private, exceed (I believe) £8000. At present, your statement inclines me to give Mr Stubbs the preference for Alwinton - but I will not decide until I have written again to Archdeacon Singleton. It seems very desirable to divide the living - but that may be left for consideration until after a new incumbent is appointed. We have so much on our hands at present as to Augmentations, that we had better clear our hands of what is already determined upon, than be encumbered with additional plans. This reminds me, however, to urge all possible dispatch in procuring the returns of the values of the respective livings about to be raised, (nine in number) that I may be able to announce their augmentation as in esse, & not in posse only, before the meeting of Parliament. I deem this of extreme importance. But you are already apprized of this from Mr Burder. Mr Faber & Mr Davison want a great deal of spurring. They are not aware, & cannot be fully so, of the real urgency of the case - & were I to yield to their dilatory propositions, nothing would be done, till it were too late for the main purpose. I have nothing to communicate from high quarters respecting Church Matters: but probably a few days will put the Archbishop in possession of the views & intentions of the Cabinet & we shall then be again called together in conclave to consider what is to be our course. I thank you for your remarks this morning on the choice of a High Sheriff. You will add to the obligation by mentioning any names which had not occurred to me, from which a selection may be made. I shall consider all such suggestions as confidential, & use my best judgement in acting upon them. I have a letter this morning from poor Housby of Denwick, asking me for the living of Wooler, which he says is vacant by the death of Mr Haigh. Having heard nothing, from any other quarter, of this vacancy, I doubt the fact. But shd it be so, I can hardly think of placing Housby in such a charge. I believe too, it is a better circumstanced benefice than he is entitled to expect. Can you furnish me with any particulars? Or confirm the report of the vacancy? Mr Faber tells me that Mr Cundill will find himself a loser of £100 per annum by taking Coniscliffe. If so, I shall be desirous of augmenting it to £300, as soon as means can be found. I never intended to diminish his income but his labour only. Mrs Van Mildert improves but very slowly, & suffers in various ways. But we hope for benefit to her from change of air & such exercise as she can bear. The house we occupied last Spring at East Sheen is preparing for us, & early in next week, we intend to take up our quarters there. My own bulletin is “much as usual”. Many happy years to you & yours - & happier times to all of us - if such be the will of Him who knows what is good for us better than we do ourselves. Have you read the last article in the last Quarterly Review? The Bp of St Asaph thinks it comes from Exeter & from some internal evidence I am almost inclined to think the same. It is a powerful performance. Dobson of Felton has asked me for the living of Alwinton. I should be glad to improve his means - but you will probably agree with me that there is a lack both of character & qualifications for so responsible a situation. ”
Paper, 4f
1833
VML 297-298   1 July 1833
Letter from WVM at Merton to CT at Ryton
Grateful for the bishop of Chester's offer of assistance with confirmations though he still hopes to do some himself which he will probably decide on after the Assizes, he considers 14 a suitable age [for confirmation] though Mr Gray of Sunderland asks for those younger to be done as he has many “taken from home” under that age which, in bona fide cases, can be considered exceptions, as he used to be allowed as rector of Bow by the late archbishop; he suggests what CT, as warden [of the university], applies, with WVM's authority and support, to appropriate bishops or ecclesiastical bodies, and certainly the archbishops, for the admittance of Durham students to the same privileges as Oxford and Cambridge, as WVM does not have the time whilst he is in town; he is ever more nervous over the Irish Bill, he fears he will break down in any attempt to do what he wants, and become “involved in distressing collisions” but he hopes to come out with a clear conscience; he forwards a note from Stanley Faber which he had rather not have received on a subject which preys on Faber's mind; he hopes all are well at Ryton.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 299   3 July 1833
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Encloses a letter from Mr Blunt which throws him “into sad perplexity” and he need's CT's help to extricate him as he cannot see how to reconcile this and CT's July audit; he has offered the other professorship to Mr Mills.
PS Please return Mr Blunt's letter.
Paper, 1f
VML 300-301   8 July 1833
Letter from WVM at Merton to CT at Ryton
The death of Mr Davison of Hartburn has been reported by Mr Orde of Nunnykirk and Mr Hodgson of Whelpington, bidding for the curacy thereby vacant on behalf of Mr Waring and himself respectively, which he will ignore at present, but he needs CT's advice on the living and the type of person needed; he is disappointed by the enclosed (not now present) letter from Mr Mills [declining the professorship] and he will now seek the dean of Christ Church's opinion on Mr Jenkyns of Oriel for the Ancient Literature professorship unless CT thinks otherwise; Dr Wordsworth laments Mr Blunt's refusal which vexes WVM, unless Mr Rose might consider it in which case he ought not to resign his current living worth £700 to £800 per annum, and he would like to settle this matter despite CT's advice to postpone it; his health is suffering and requires “a thorough discipline of Harrogate bathing & drinking”; he hopes to find out tomorrow when the Irish Church Bill will be discussed in the Lords which will determine his movements to Harrogate, Auckland and Durham, with the Assizes also being then, but he will need CT's assistance as he does not feel fit for the approaching bustle; he quits [Merton] tomorrow with a week in [London] thence before heading north.
PS He encloses a letter from the dean of Chirst Church which CT should return, with that of Mr Mills.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML302    9 July 1833
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
Forwards the enclosed at the vicar of Guisborough's request, on the advice of Joshua Watson, about which CT ought to be able to make further enquiry based on the references to Gaisford and Dr Smth; he is going to the Lords to hear when they are to discuss “the abominable Irish Bill”.
Paper, 2f
VML 303-304   12 July 1833
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at Ryton
He will ruminate on the matters in CT's letter; he is annoyed at the postponement of the second reading of the [Irish] Bill as he has to leave the following day to reach Harrogate as scheduled, all is “darkness & uncertainty as to the result”, though the bench [of bishops] will probably split half and half; by comparison the Assizes will be a respite and recreation, especially as he hears that Chief Justice Denman is “remarkably pleasant”, “if politics are not mooted”, though he will depend on CT's good offices to keep all in good order and humour .
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 305   13 July 1833
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
As the Irish Bill is postponed to Wednesday, he will then travel to Harrogate and Auckland; he has directed CT's enclosure for Dr Smith to him at Drayton.
Paper, 1f
VML 306   2 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He needs CT's personal advice but will have to make do with correspondence; he is sending letters from Mr Rose and the bishop of London, and feels he cannot allow Mr Rose “to carry into effect his intentions respecting Durham”; WVM fears he may be seen as “ instrumental in his (Rose's) running counter to his diocesan”, and also Archdeacon Lyall's advice, and also that of “his medical oracle”, so WVM will write to the bishop of London leaving the matter to him, undertaking not to influence Mr Rose, and he will perhaps write to Mr Rose likewise; he has written to CT re the bishop of Carlisle's intentions re confirmations and he suggests that perhaps he might hold an ordination at Newcastle as well if CT agrees; he wishes CT could think and act for him in such matters as he is “in sad plight” himself and also fears for his wife, exacerbated by the albeit quiet guests they have entertained.
Paper, 2f, torn
VML 307   3 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses inserting further advertisements of the ordination in other newspapers as he has done in the Tyne Mercury.
Paper, 1f, badly damaged with damp with text missing
VML 308   5 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He forgot to ask if Mr Durell and Mr Gisborne had been written to re the appropriation of their stalls; if not, the expediting of this would help his negotiations over the professorships.
Paper, 2f
VML 309   10 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He has discussed with Mr Davison the conveyance of land which WVM had given for a new church, burial ground and parsonage at Stockton so that it can be consecrated before the bishop of Chester departs, and WVM has directed his nephew Gresley to confer with Burder re its building as it is important to strike while the iron is hot; he has also mentioned Washington church to Mr Burder, also the augmentation of Tanfield, and setting out the district for Etherley, seemingly delayed by Mr Chester's ill humour; he has also asked Archdeacon Singleton about the programme for the bishop of Carlisle's confirmation.
Paper, 2f
VML 310-311   11 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton, enclosing the following
Discusses a received letter from Mr D. Durell, that WVM is sorry the proposal has been started if Durell is not pleased, and would rather it be recalled if possible; he asks if CT could examine Mr Edmund Wills of Belford and Mr Christopher Rapier of Morpeth to enable them to be ordained priests by the bishop of Carlisle, though Strong could do it at Sedgefield.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 312   11 September 1833
Letter from J. Davison at the Registry Office, Durham, to WVM
Asking him to fix a date for the consecration of the new chapel at Usworth which Revd Percival rector of Washington reports is now ready.
Paper, 2f
VML 313-314   12 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
Sending two letters which he has no time to comment upon, asking him to organise the bishop of Chester to consecrate Usworth chapel, or perhaps it can be licensed for the present and consecrated later; Mrs Van Mildert feels emboldened to visit Whickham rectory and he intends to hold a confirmation there, but only CT is to be invited as WVM would appreciate conferring on matters.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 315-316   13 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
Mr Strong will examine candidates for orders at Sedgefield so CT is relieved, but please inform Mr Blenkinsopp that he is to attend; he hopes to meet CT in Durham after his return from Whickham; he supposes the Barnard Castle matter is settled without Mr Davidson needing to call on WVM and he would be ready to make up the £120 per annum if the person CT mentions is to be nominated; Strong is apprizing Mr Taylor and Mr Russell of the times of their [ordination] examinations, with the candidates now being Mr Taylor and Mr W. Maughan as deacons and Mr Wills, Mr Rapier, Mr Russell, Mr Collinson, Mr Scurr, Mr Blenkinsopp and Mr Belayney as priests; he will write to Mr Durell as CT advises; he will hold a confirmation for all the Aucklands in his chapel at Auckland; Richardson from Harrogate is staying.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 317   [?20 September 1833]
Letter from WVM at Whickham to CT
He had expected that CT would call as he needs to confer but he will now forward the enclosed letters; “Thank God! we continue to go on favourably up-stairs”.
Paper, 1f
VML 318   25 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Mrs Van Mildert has survived the journey and has had an airing in an open carriage, and if she continues to progress they will go to Harrogate; he suggests times when CT might call for a “confabulation” before they “separate for October”.
Paper, 1f, badly damaged by damp
VML 319-320   27 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
Interruptions have frustrated his intention to prepare a communication for chapter re the appropriation of the stalls but perhaps CT can reopen the matter with his authority; he discusses the nuances of the matter and his readiness to accede to chapter's wishes as far as possible, and he still hopes to send CT a more formal document on this before the meeting.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 321   28 September 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Asking him to put the enclosed (no longer present) paper before chapter if he does not find it objectionable; it may be obscure anyway being written when he should have been abed; he hopes Mr Wellesley is correct that they may expect CT for dinner.
Paper, 1f, damaged by damp
VML 322-323    5 October 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
He is sorry not have written sooner; the invalid [his wife] has survived the journey and should continue to improve with a strict regimen and medicine, and the mental powers are also improving, though he has learnt not to have too high expectations; Mr Rose has written to say he will visit CT at Bamburgh “to discuss matters previous to opening the campaign at Durham” and he looks forward to profitting from their joint councils; he will write to Mr Hodgson of Whelpington removing him to Hartburn and he will offer Whelpington to Davison at Durham in exchange for his southern living, unless CT thinks he should offer it to Mr Gasker, and thereby place Mr Shute at Mitford; he has written a dry negative answer to Sir Robert Hawks's “strange proposition” about Gateshead Fell; his carriage awaits for an airing.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 324-325   11 October 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
He needs his opinion about Sir Robert Hawks's enclosed “vehement remonstrance” as he anticipates lots of odium if he keeps to his position; he also encloses a decorous letter from Mr G. Burges about the professorship already offered to another; please return all (neither letter now present).
PS He is grateful for his letter and concern; Mrs Van Mildert is improving in body and mind; he wishes Mr Rose was with him; when does he return from Bamburgh.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 326   11 October 1833
Letter from [CT] at Bamburgh Castle to WVM
Discussing Sir Robert Hawks and the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and the acquisition of land at Gateshead Fell for a new rectory, and the rudeness of Mr W. Hawks, and the opinion of Mr M. Plummer and Mr Hall, the two landed proprietors of the parish sitting on the Commission, that it was not a fit residence for a rector, and that the proposed augmentation ought to be put in trust for the benefit of the living.
Paper, 2f, faded and stained
VML 327   14 October 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is grateful for his letter re Gateshead Fell (next above), and agrees with his points, but proposes that, in addition to the £100 increase to the living, he would make it up to £300 which should be made known to the Commissioners, [Sir Robert Hawks] and the rector to ensure a good result; he is anxious that CT should have contact with Mr Rose and get him into harness; he has been at Addington and the archbishop reports that his services at the outset [of the university] would be a value but he is concerned re his health; he is glad CT has met the bishop of Carlisle and got through the visitation; he has not heard re the resignation at Chillingham but Mr Tristram's information, if correct, would remove “a disagreeable suspense”.
Paper, 2f
VML 328-329   22 October 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Ryton
Forwards a letter from Mr Jenkyns, who is soon to arrive in Durham, and whom he has asked Mr Durell to attend to, as well as Mr Rose, who is also on his way to Durham; he hopes CT will soon be in the College from Bamburgh as “the important day of opening our Institution” is impending; he hopes chapter will allow at least £500 each to Mr Jenkyns and Mr Rose and, if more is needed, he will provide the difference.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 330-331   2 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He is grateful for his letter and congratulates CT on “having made so auspicious a commencement of your academical charge” [of the university]; Mr Piele (Thomas Williamson Peile) has also reported on the proceedings and that he is to occupy WVM's house at the foot of the Castle but that it is out of repair which WVM is happy to remedy if Mr Miller will allow Ramshaw to report on what is needed, and he is also happy to fund any improvements; he needs to confer further with CT on the regulations to be adopted and the stalls to be annexed and he does not think it advisable to await six vacancies as the professors need their reward, so can he discuss this with Mr Durell and especially Dr Smith; he is also perplexed over the disposal of Chillingham and Whelpington, both now resigned, and he hopes that they can confer more readily when he returns to Auckland.
PS Mr Chaytor would be the proper person to draw up more formal appointments for Mr Jenkyns and Mr Rose.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 332-333   5 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is pleased at his continued reports of academical proceedings; Mr Peile as a married man requires more accommodation than the Greek professor and should be nearer the students [so put him in the Castle house], perhaps the Greek and Divinity professors can be in College, otherwise WVM would be happy to fund the purchase or lease of a house if Davison can find one; he understands Mr Jenkyns will not return to Durham until January; he is happy for Cosin's Library to be used for the Sunday Evening Lecture or similar purpose, but no improper access to the books must be permitted and Mr George [the librarian] should be consulted about observing regulations; has any room been prepared for a library for the academical body, as he presumes the books already presented to the university are somewhere and as soon as he knows what has been done, he will probably “have somewhat to contribute to the collection”; he is also keen on the more rapid succession to stalls as they may need to go to parliament and they occur no obloquy on that score; he will be glad if the Commissioners' meeting at Gateshead Fell can come to a satisfactory conclusion, in which he is happy to assist; he is also happy to be used re The Sons of the Clergy and he will pay £100 to meet half the deficiency; as church rates, tithes and taxes seem to be “fast hastening to extinction”, what will become of all episcopal revenues as he needs the forebearance of a radical government to ensure that he can provide for academial or ecclesiastical bodies; he will return to Auckland next week, but needs CT's views on Chillingham and Whelpington, and whether Mr Davison jr would exchange his southern living for the latter, a living of almost £300 pa; he also discusses Mr Gasker as a possible for either; he has written more than he intended.
PS Could CT send the address of Mrs Wilson, the mother of a new foundation sudent at Durham as he wants to write to her.
Paper, 4f
VML 334   6 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is satisfied at having just written to Mr Gasker acceding to his request for Chillingham, and he will offer Mitford to Mr Shute, and adopt his suggestion of leaving the proposed Whelpington exchange to the parties themselves, but he has just been applied to for Whelpington by Mr Middleton who seems to have been unkindly overlooked by Chapter, but what is CT's opinion.
Paper, 1f
VML 335   8 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
They will return to Auckland next Wednesday and he hopes to see CT as soon as possible but to hear from him before, especially re today's conference re Gateshead Fell; best regards to Prof Rose and Mrs Thorp.
Paper, 1f
VML 336   11 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He intends to return to Auckland on Wednesday though he is still concerned re Mrs Van Mildert's fluctuating health; Mr Richardson has promised to accompany them; then they need to confer on Gateshead Fell and The Sons of the Clergy.
Paper, 1f
VML 337   15 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He had been expecting CT and hopes he has not forgotten or that nothing has happened, and that he will call, with his night-cap if it suits.
Paper, 1f
VML 338   19 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He hopes he will be able to direct the 12 enclosed cards, as well as the one to himself; Mr Wellesley will bar this; he is anxious to hear what he may be allowed of chapter tomorrow; Stanley Faber tells him that Dr Ellerton reports that the candidates for the chancellorship of Oxford are the earl of Carlisle and the earl of Mansfield; they should support the latter.
Paper, 2f
VML 339-340   23 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He is much comforted by both CT's letters and he might have come to College in person to say so, but instead he has invited the dean, along with the sheriff and Darnell, but unfortunately Archdeacon Singleton, Townsend and Gilly cannot come, in which case CT will be the only prebend unless he can bring any others, especially Smith or Durhall though he is concerned at CT's report of the former; if he approves, could he forward the enclosed invitation to “my worthy librarian” Mr Patrick George; he wants to know more about the house in the Bailey for the Greek professor which should not go to anyone else; he does not doubt that the chapter have chosen fit successors to the Grammar School and the Yorkshire living; he and Mr Rose are to note their dinner hour of 5, as they are growing antiquated in their habits as well as their years.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 341   24 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Could CT secure answers from Mr [Thomas] Greenwood and Mr [James] Hamilton for Wednesday.
PS Could he invite the lecturer in Chemistry and Mineralogy, Mr Johnstone (J.F.W. Johnston), if he is in Durham; WVM is not keen on his holding forth in Newcastle so he is not to be invited if he is, and WVM does not mind if he knows it.
Paper, 1f
VML 342   25 November 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Could CT bring his manservant to assist at table on Wednesday as theirs is still “gouty & infirm”.
Paper, 1f
VML 343-344   2 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
Sends the enclosed following letter; he has asked Prof Rose to confer with CT about his letter; he can add no more as his letter-bearer, Mr Wellesley, is about to start for Durham.
Paper, 1f + envelope
VML 345   28 November 1833
Letter from Thomas Butler at Bolton le Sands to [WVM], with a draft of WVM's reply
Asking to be considered for the post of professor of Mathematics, outlining his academic attainments, first class degree, indisposed for the Senior Wranglership examination, fellow at Trinity College Cambridge, Morning Preacher to the Asylum for Female Orphans and other posts, his learned instructions and eloquence in the pulpit have earned much praise.
Endorsed with a draft of WVM's reply that the appointment is made by the dean and chapter rather than himself and so his application has been referred to the warden, CT.
Paper, 2f, with holes with some text lost
VML 346-348   7 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He hopes to pass on his letter and enclosure to the archbishop; Prof Rose intends to journey south at the end of term and hopes to confer with the archbishop on the university and the reception of its degrees, which personal approach should be more advantageous of success than correspondence; Rose also hopes the plan for the stalls can be finally decided, so perhaps Rose can seek the assistance of some peers in the Lords when the bill comes in, though WVM still cannot decide on any plan without the dean and chapter's aid, he rehearses various options which might be most advantegous to the university and the expectations of the professors; Rose also suggests a difficulty over charging the classical professor's stall similary to that of the Divinity professor, and he would prefer that the chapter resolves this with Mr Jenkyns, but WVM is concerned that everything has not been fully thought through; he intends to appear in Bishop Cosin's Library next Thursday but how should he be attired, and when should he appear, given that he must return to Auckland before nightfall, and please can there be some “tolerable warmth” in the Library; it is stirring in his archdeaconry with the address to the primate which Singleton is doing as the bishop should not be the prime mover in but be “entirely out of sight”; should CT not meet with him and Archdeacon Singleton at Durham on the matter of Bishop Barrington's codicil, though Auckland would be preferrable; could CT write to Rose as WVM does not have the time.
Paper, 4f + envelope
VML 349-350   10 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Sending a haunch of venison and a pine[apple] to help him in “so frequently exercising Academical Hospitality”; he will arrive on Thursday; his gown and cassock will be “the fittest costume”; he is sorry if there are demurs about the address.
Paper, 1f + envelope
VML 351   18 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is very “distressed” with letter-writing; he discusses the address, and wishes “it had never been stirred”; he cannot decide if it were better done partially or entirely, but whatever they do, “the evil tongues of slander & misrepresentation will be sure to place us in the worst possible light”; he has told Prof Rose that no public notice should be taken of Mr Sandford's preface, but he has sent all his correspondence with Sandford to Rose with instructions to show it to CT as well so that he can see for himself how unworthy are the insinuations that his diocesan is an “ultra Church-Reformer”; he would like to talk to CT before he goes to Ryton at any time that fits in with his “more indispensable occupations”.
Paper, 2f
VML 352   23 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Can CT show the [no longer present] enclosed to the dean and Prof Rose to get their opinion on the archbishop [of Canterbury]'s suggestion of communicating with the archbishop of York and the bishop of London, but he will do what chapter suggests, and the archbishop of Canterbury should be a valuable ally; he hopes Prof Rose will adopt the archbishop's suggestion of publishing his lecture, perhaps modified to “guard it against malevolent observations”; can CT carry out the desire of Mr Cotes to appoint Mr Cookson to the curacy.
Paper, 2f
VML 353   25 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses the Bedlington curacy situation, and Mr Meggison of Bolam's view that Mr Booty should be [curate]; having introduced him into his house as tutor as he does not wish Mr Meggison to consider himself “Purveyor General in the department of Curates”, though he is prepared to yield “rather than create disturbance”; he has written to the archbishop [of Canterbury] agreeing with the dean's and CT's wishes; he is too busy with the “higher concerns” of Christmas for other matters.
Paper, 2f
VML 354   30 December 1833
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He was perplexed and distressed by Mr Plummer's letter and discusses the prospects of the son who ought to be satisfied with Heworth with the possibility of an exchange should his health fail and another post be available, but he would rather CT declined his request unless he did not wish to; Prof Rose has written full of “his wonted liberality & disinterestedness”, and WVM has suggested a meeting with him, CT and Singleton to consider his proposal; he must write to Mr Cotes and Mr Booty.
PS He has not heard from Mr Davison and so he supposes that an exchange is not being proposed.
Paper, 2f
1834
VML 355-356   7 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
Discusses the applications to Kirkwhelpington of Mr Goldsmith, and also of Mr Walker of Gosforth, Mr Errington of Cowpen Blythe, Mr Middleton of Sedgefield, Mr Furness and others, also Mr Cartwright's son at Norton, “O! the plague & trouble of patronage, which every body covets, & nobody disposes of without giving offence”, but does CT know of Davison jr's intentions; he hopes CT will visit when he is in Durham, as he intends going to Harrogate soon.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 357-358   8 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton (The College, Durham, cancelled)
The bishop of Carlisle wants the consecration of North Sunderland church to be next Monday or Tuesday which he hopes CT can fix as the bishop may soon have to return to his own diocese; he encloses (no longer present) a paper from the National Society, with his copy answer, which shows how the government is likely to work though he rather wishes that the National Society had nothing to do with it.
PS Two boxes of books are packed ready to be sent tomorrow for the university and he intends to order more from London.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 359   9 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Encloses (?now DUL ASC THO 139) a letter from the archbishop [of Canterbury] which he should show to the dean and Prof Rose and return to him, so he now needs their advice on how best to apply to the rest of the episcopal bench, and also to communicate with Oxford and Cambridge, which latter might best be done by the dean and chapter, with perhaps CT dealing with Oxford and Prof Rose with Cambridge, but the dean should decide and also on whether it should be done formally through the vice-chancellors and governing bodies or through individuals such as the dean of Christ Church and the master of Trinity; he needs to talk about Kirkwhepington which continues to perplex him.
PS What does CT think of Mr Rawes of Easington for Kirkwhelpington as it would gratify Mr Prosser, whose letter he has, and allow for a “good young clergyman” at Easington.
Paper, 2f
VML 360-361   14 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
“I grieve sincerely for the loss of my worthy Librarian, Patrick George, for whom I had much regard, & considered him peculiarly fitted for the station. The inclosed letter from Mr Raine came this morning. I shall postpone answering it till I see or hear from you. There can be no doubt of his literary qualifications - but recollecting some awkward surmises respecting his use of the access he had to your Chapter Archives, I think it prudent to pause upon the present application. I have no other person, however, in contemplation & may be at a loss to suit myself better elsewhere. The emoluments of the office I do not recollect, but they can hardly be considerable. Nevertheless, Bishop Cosin's Mss ought not to be committed to doubtful hands. Give me your advice freely."”; thinks it desirable, “with a view to the Schoolmasters plan”, to bring Mr Bamford into the cathedral; he hopes to see CT on his return to Durham before WVM goes to Harrogate.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 362-363   17 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
Discusses an enclosed (no longer present) letter from the bishop of Exeter seeking the opinions of the dean and CT on whether the precedents are cases in point and should he accede to the proposal, but he hopes that the prebendal houses can be secured for a professor or another official university person, rent-free; WVM has answered Prof Rose's letter “of great importance” which CT should see; he needs to talk with CT before he goes to Harrogate, a morning would be best as he cannot offer a bed as most of the household will precede them to Harrogate; he has not written to the bishops as he is not sure how to do it and he cannot face transcribing 20 copies of CT's and Prof Rose's letters as his daily correspondence is increasing greatly, so can CT and Prof Rose “just draw out the briefest possible statement” for him to send to each bishop as otherwise he will have to give up the undertaking as he must go away and attend to “one whose claims are paramount to all others”.
PS He has “negatived” Mr Raine's application [to be Cosin's librarian].
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 364   24 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He needs CT's advice to respond to Mr Burder's request for information to enable him to draw up a bill for annexing stalls to university offices; he arrived [at Harrogate] yesterday and was grateful for the presence of Mr Richards on the journey to put him at ease about Mrs Van Mildert.
PS He needs the bishop of St Davids's letter back before he can answer that of the bishop of Exeter; has CT secured Mr Wardill for the Newcastle assize sermon, he has written to Mr Webster for Durham.
Paper, 2f
VML 365-366   27 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He needs CT's advice re Mr Clementson who “has troublesome spirits to deal with” which may need the intervention of the court of Chancery unless WVM has more power as visitor, though he does not have the Charity Commissioners' reports to hand as they are left at Auckland; he is grateful for CT's advice for Mr Burder re stalls though he is perplexed by the matter and despairs “of carrying it through unobjectionably or even safely”; now he knows that Mr George had arranged the matter about Mr Hogg's removal he will take no further part in it and destroy the anonymous letter, so CT is to let the matter take its course; “The appointment of a Librarian shall wait till I receive information of the Chapter's views & intentions respecting some University or Chapter office to be connected with it - especially with reference to Mr Chevaliere. In case we are at a loss in that quarter, do you think Mr Dodd, the curate of Whickham, would be a fit & acceptable person? His literary reputation stands high, I believe, especially in Hebrew, & if so, might it not be well to make him both Hebrew Reader & Librarian? Tell me what you think of this.”; he will soon set to work with the bishop of Exeter; he will reassure Mr Durell about the apparent lack of an address to the archbishop from Durham compared to the appearance of one from Northumberland; “My head & hand hardly have a respite from epistolary drudgery. But they cannot be better employed than when co-operating with such as yourself for any public good”.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 367-368   30 January 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Encloses his copy letter (no longer present) to the bishop of Exeter for showing to the dean and returning; lhe eaves the “Darlington School affair” and “the poor woman at the Library” to CT's disposal; CT's information is sufficient for WVM to dismiss considering Mr Dodd as a possible librarian and he will now await chapter's deliberation on academical appointments or minor canonries that might be connected with it before deciding on a librarian; he encloses also copies (no longer present) of letters to Mr Cotes and Mr Botty, and Mr Cotes's reply to whom, with Mr Meggison, he would be glad not to have to write again as, of all in the diocese, they “are really loathsome” to him, and he is half inclined not to license Mr Booty but rather leave him on sufferance.
PS He still awaits his circulars to go to the bishops re degrees.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 369   2 February 1834
Paper, 1f, wrapper fragment
VML 370-371   4 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is disappointed at Mr Webster twice declining the [Durham] assize sermon as he had thought him “a man of more energies”, so which of Mr Gamlin, Mr Temple of Dalton le Dale, Mr Brewster jr, Mr Merest or Mr Carr would CT recommend, or perhaps Mr Cresswell of Seaham, or anyone else; he hopes CT's health improves, theirs is “stationary”.
Paper, 1f + envelope
VML 372-373   7 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He needs to fix an assize preacher; the bishop of Exeter has agreed to apply only for a renewal of his dispensation with the same limitation as before; “Earl Grey talks like a Church-Conservative. Will he hold firm against his radical supporters? or will he inveigle us in some insidious proposal to make us instruments of our own ruin? Nous verrons.”
Paper, 1f + wrapper
VML 374-375   13 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Encloses five more episcopal answers, discusses the less satisfactory one of the bishop of Hereford (?now DUL ASC THO 153) about admitting Durham graduates merely as candidates for ordination who, if rejected, would bring disgrace [on the university], and he dismisses the bishop's desire for more experience of the working of the institution as unreasonable; he sympathises with the bishop of Llandaff's reservation (?in DUL ASC THO 154) about principality students; he will have soon to discuss further his perplexities over the annexation of stalls and other matters re the reputation and success “in the great work we have in hand”; he is keen to hear of CT's improving health; he is quite satisfied with the arrangements re the houses for Mr Piele and Mr Jenkyns which Douglas Gresley has told him about; he discusses his further contributions to the university chest but needs a statement of what he was pledged to and what is yet unfulfilled; sad to hear of the death of [Robert] Surtees of Mainsforth.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 376-377   14 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Encloses two more episcopal answers and discusses the “discouraging & vexatious” one from the bishop of Exeter that they are no better than the London University.
PS Please return his draft reply to the bishop of Exeter and the bishop's letter.
Paper, 1f + envelope
VML 378   15 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Encloses another episcopal letter, which is very pleasing, and he wonders if the writer may soon extend a similar favour to the London University, though he does seem to show “special grounds of confidence in our Institution”; he will consider the annexation of stalls next week otherwise they might miss the present session of parliament; he must also confer about a Hebrew Reader, a didactic professor and Cosin's Librarianship.
Paper, 1f
VML 379   17 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Encloses letters from the bishops of Chester, Bangor, Oxford and the archbishop of Canterbury (part); he was going to write about stalls but he has just had a fresh alarm about his wife though Richardson does not seem to think it is a danger.
PS Tell Prof Rose that he cannot yet write to him.
Paper, 1f
VML 380-381   22 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Encloses the bishop of Rochester's letter (DUL ASC THO 168a), which might have been a concern if it had come first, and his draft reply for CT's opinion.
Paper, 1f + envelope
VML 382   25 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Now he sends the bishop of Rochester's letter, and CT can have a copy reply when he visits; they need to talk over Oxford and Cambridge which he feels uncomfortable about CT's doubts over, but he has told the archbishop [of Canterbury] to suspend communications with the [university] chancellors until he receives the documents which CT is preparing which should arrive soon he hopes, to maintain his ardour; he was sorry he was not at Durham to hear Prof Jenkyns's inaugural lecture.
PS He can now spare a copy of his reply to the bishop of Rochester so he encloses it (DUL ASC THO 169).
Paper, 2f
VML 383    26 February 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Awaits CT's view on the enclosed anonymous letter about Mr Reid, and Mr Blackett's applications for the lectureship, and whether a licence would be necessary, which he would hesitate to grant.
Paper, 1f
VML 384-385   14 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Burder's letters and parcels pour in night and day with such unremitting speed that he fears his intellects will give way along with his bodily powers, so there is little time to exchange correspondence about matters, except for especially the petition, when Burder sends it, for the bill must have the chapter seal otherwise “the whole must instantly fall to the ground”; he is also concerned by the North Durham and Berwick affair about which Burder and the bishop of Exeter have written saying that Mr McCrea and Mr Grieve want the proposed measure [?incorporating North Durham and Berwick into Northumberland] to be resisted, but if it succeeds Lord Howick should be lord lieutenant of the new county, but this should not be circulated as it may only be a rumour, WVM has written to [his temporal] Chancellor Williamson, the high sheriff and the chairman of the sessions, whose views and cooperation are essential, and CT could canvass Mr Cuthbert Ellison and Dr Renwick; he would rather be listening to his Divinity professor this morning than dealing with such matters; he hopes they all got safely to Durham.
PS Encloses Mr Burder's letter which CT should return with Mr McCrea's note.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 386-387   15 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Encloses Mr Burder's additional clauses for their bill for the dean's approval, which WVM thinks satisfactory with [the bill] ready to go to committee but the chapter seal will be needed forthwith; he is communicating with the high sheriff and his temporal chancellor about North Durham and Berwick.
PS Mr Cuthbert Ellison's opinion on North Durham would have great weight; he is happy, as custos of the county, to promote whatever remedies the magistrates have for the alleged evils, whatever the cost and trouble to him.
Paper, 1f + envelope
VML 388-389   16 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He is vexed that the chapter seal cannot be added in time so he has instructed Burder to draw the petition in his name only for his signature; he is sorry that Mr Cuthbert Ellsion has gone to London, as reported in The Newcastle Journal, though he may be useful there if the North Durham affair continues, about which he has written to Sir James Scarlett and Serjt Jones; if the professor prints his second lecture, he hopes “he will soften it down” within the bounds of truth and argument, and he still awaits a copy of the first; if CT goes to Hammerton to retireve his domestic treasures, WVM hopes he will visit them, which would be desirable if Mr Burder visits as well; “this is more than I like writing on a Sunday”.
Paper, 1f + wrapper
VML 390-391   17 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He will write to Burder telling him to proceed instantly with the petition in WVM's name only, to be signed by him, and that it does not need communicating to Lord Grey before it has been presented to parliament as it is only a preliminary to bringing in the bill, which would be the best time to acquaint Lord Grey with it, which WVM will do himself, possibly in person if he is then in town as Lord Grey needs to know that WVM has not kept back from fulfilling his pledge, but if the bill falls then the present occupiers of the offices “will still have a fair chance of these dignities” and their successors will have to “make their way” with future bishops and chapters; if Burder visits re this, then WVM will let CT know; Mr Langhorn of Berwick has written with the memorial of the mayor and corporation against the proposed measure, which he has suggested is sent also to the high sheriff, chairman of the sessions, and other rmagistrates, and which he has sent to his attorney and solicitor general, he suspects “a desire to clip the wings of the Count Palatine” is behind this and if Lord Grey and “his noble relative” [?Lord Howick] approve then it will probably go through.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 392   25 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
From a cursory reading, he likes much the proposed statutes for the university and the college actually received 3 or 4 days ago; the petition for the bill re the stalls was presented last Friday, though signed by him alone, it is also in the chapter's name, the necessity of which Burder has explained to CT; he discusses Burder's planned trip to the north, and WVM's trip to London in time to attend parliament immediately after the recess, before which much might be arranged and settled if CT is in residence at Durham at Easter and there is a chapter; he trusts that CT will be attending the imminent magistrates' meeting re the North Durham memorial and that he will support Mr Hopper Williamson's “Scheme & Observation” about it.
Paper, 2f
VML 393-394   27 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Ryton
He is sorry that ill-disposed persons have disturbed CT's peace and quiet at Ryton, but it seems as if the Church's real friends are subject to harassments and perplexities of every kind now, such as the issue of church rates, “part of the projects for sapping & mining our foundations, by which our enemies may more easily effect our overthrow, than by open warfare”; he is discouraged by the letter from the Oxford vice-chancellor, and also by Lord Grey's use of the Cambridge petition, so that he suggests that their policy re Durham University should be to make as little stir as possible till the outcome of the parliamentary and privy council discussions is clear, and “if the old universities are to be upset”, then he wishes that their stalls bill had been kept back until these points had been settled otherwise their bill, although a private one, might fall; Burder needs to get to Durham in time to ensure that the chapter seal does not have to be applied after [the chapter meeting] on the 4th [April]; he dislikes having to write to Mr Durell but he first needs an answer from Dr Prosser, and he also needs to know if Mr Smith's consent is cordial or constrained; a letter from the high sheriff diminishes his confidence about the outcome of today's magistrates' meeting.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 395-396   28 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Ryton (The College, Durham, cancelled)
Mr Burder has written saying that he will be at Durham on 3 April, the day before chapter, which will give the opportunity to discuss fully the particulars of the bill which may be most questionable as he needs “the full concurrence of the Chapter” to proceed without fear and anxiety; the high sheriff reports a thin attendance of only 15 or 16 magistrates, with CT absent and Mr Davison the only cleric at the meeting, and none of the staunch conservatives from around Norton there, so that “the rights & dignity of the Palatinate are, so far, gone” and the interests of North Durham scarcely better “for its dismemberment”; better thoughts must occupy him and church-time approaches.
Paper, 1f + wrapper
VML 397-398   31 March 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Agrees with CT over North Durham that WVM should keep in the background his personal interests about upholding its connection with the palatinate, and he has written to the high sheriff to use his discretion about the bishop's role which he hopes CT will also confirm to him; he is about to write to Mr Durell but needs clarification of CT's report that Dr Prosser “made no observation whatever” as WVM would interpret silence as dissatisfaction; CT should ask Dr Smith to write to WVM his real opinion as, without the cordial cooperation of chapter, he will be inclined to withdraw the bill or even drop it altogether until a future session, and nor has the dean made his position clear, so WVM is in the dark about the bona fide sentiments of those whom he is most anxious to satisfy.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 399-400   2 April 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He is grateful for CT's valuable suggestions re North Durham, and he will now write to the high sheriff with the hope that the proposed bill may be postponed, which effect CT's letter to Mr Orde might also achieve if he and the other memorialists hasten to prevent Lord Howick from bringing in the bill on the 15th, which would all greatly lighten his burden; he would also be grateful for the assistance of CT, the dean, and Dr Smiths in proceeding with the university bill, or withdrawing it, and he will talk to Burder and the dean, after chapter, though they will not be able to talk for long as he will soon be off to London; also Mrs Van Mildert's [poor] health precludes visits, and his joining her for her daily airings together with his correspondence do not leave much time for leisure; he will go to London alone as Richardson thinks Mrs Van Mildert would be better not making such a journey.
[PS] He is in correspondence with the high sheriff at Darlington and will be more so when he returns to Dryburn; he has written to Mr Durell.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 401-402   3 April 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He omitted the Satley parsonage matter yesterday, to which [augmentation] he is happy to give £200 if CT will ask Burder to proceed accordingly as he is keen to have these finalised so CT can pledge WVM for the amounts as necessary; he is not sure how long Burder will be in the north but he has asked Douglas Gresley to see Burder before Burder does head south.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 403   4 April 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He has written another letter to the high sheriff which he hopes CT will not find objectionable; he presumed Burder did not have the option of postponing the printing of the bill, which might have been perferrable; he asks CT's opinion of Mr Strong for the Durham assize sermon - as he fears Prof Rose or Jenkyns will be absent - and Mr Gipps, Mr Hodgson or Mr Reid for Newcastle; Burder can be directed to prepare the necessary licence to open Shildon as soon after Whitsun as it will be ready, and he understands Mr Manisty is to be appointed; however, a clergyman from Pontefract, Mr Russell, has certified Mr Blackwell's fitness, whom he says has been recommended to CT by Mr Smithson who gave the site for Shildon chapel, and Blackwell is also apparently recommended by the bishop of Chester, all of which WVM is querying as he would not go outside his own diocese for such a post; he is equally ready to settle Esh chaplery as he did with Satley yesterday, if CT will set Davison and Douglas Gresley to work purchasing the suggested estate and house.
Paper, 2f
VML 404-405    9 April 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
His invaluable letter (?draft in DUL ASC THO 171), with one from the high sheriff, has been quite a cordial to him and will cheer him on his lonely journey [to London]; he is much relieved and further hopes for the assistance of CT and Dr Smith in his other difficulties which he will attempt to dismiss from his mind on his journey; he is delighted by yesterday's proceedings re Norhamshire and has written to the high sheriff so.
[PS] He had two hours pleasant conversation yesterday with the dean.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 406-407   12 April 1834
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at The College, Durham
He arrived safely yesterday and has had “a comfortable letter” from Mrs Van Mildert to relieve his anxieties; he is also grateful for CT's letter and will talk to Sir James Scarlett about the point he mentions but he is inclined to seek the postponement of the measure rather than seek immediate warfare though hostilities should be prepared for; he has briefed Burder on Durham matters; Burder states that the bill cannot be forced on against their inclinations and that they can withdraw it at any time even after the third reading, but they still need to “know the real sentiments of the Higher Powers before we get inconveniently entangled” and he hopes to talk to the premier early next week; he notes a strange combination of hail, thunder, lightning, sun and wind which he can avert as he has plenty to occupy him by his fireside; CT's presence in town might soon by very desirable.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 408   25 April 1834
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT
He is sorry CT is indisposed but he will have the committee on their bill postponed so that he hopes CT can travel to London and confer beforehand, and when CT can confirm this, WVM will bring together the bishops of Exeter and Chester, and the dean of Durham (now at Berkhamstead) for a full discussion; Dr Smith has yet to offer his opinion which he hopes he will pass on to CT so that they can have as much of the chapter cognizant of proceedings as possible, and he supposes a greater proportion only musters at audits; the high sheriff has reported the magistrates' resolutions which he entirely accords with and which he will pass on to Sir James Scarlett and warn him against being surprised about; “I cannot wish the librarianship of Bp Cosin's Library to be in better hands than Mr Whitley's, and you will oblige me by telling him so”, and the appointment can be made out as soon as he can direct Douglas Gresley, with Whitley at liberty to enter upon his charge as soon as suits; would he approve of Mr Gamlin for Durham and Mr Walker of [Kirk]whelpington for Newcastle as assize preachers.
PS If CT has doubts about “bearing the journey without injury”, he should not attempt it and WVM will do his best “or throw up the business altogether”.
Paper, 2f
VML 409-410    9 May 1834
Letter from WVM at Hanover Square to CT at 4 Bath Buildings, Cheltenham
A letter from Lord Grey induces him to postpone their bill's committee to Monday, when he might expect a definitive anwer, probably in the affirmative, to the restriction of the prerogative, which can then be dealt with in committee, and his further personal attendance can be dispensed with; this will delay his leaving London though he still hopes to be in Harrogate on Wednesday; he wishes to know CT's plans re returning to London or heading to Durham; the dean of Carlisle has just given him the enclosed (no longer present) paper.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 411   17 May 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Enclosing a letter for CT whose seal he advertently broke before he realised whom it was for but he has not unfolded it.
Paper, 1f, damaged by damp
VML 412-413   22 May 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He is glad that Mr Sisson has acquitted himself to CT's satisfaction and presumes he is in correspondence with Mr Burder so that no further advice is needed from WVM; Mr Sisson has now just been to see him, he was “all abroad” as to what to do, which WVM has tried to help with and he hopes he can find Burder at Buckden; Archdeacon Singleton recommends Mr Hunter of Whalton for the Newcastle assize sermon, to whom he has written accordingly, and also Mr Gripps of Corbridge and Mr Reid of Newburn but he thinks both have done it before; he hopes to have “some personal intercourse with the University at Durham” before the long vacation, so he will be at Auckland in the first week of June and would appreciate him visiting to discuss how he can be brought “into contact with the Academical Body” at Durham Castle for a day or two but his plans are very “undigested” at present and he would appreciate CT's advice; CT can confer confidentially with Dr Smith on it.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 414   24 May 1834
Wrapper from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
Sending him a form for the incumbent at Heworth for him to fill in the names of the incumbent and two other clergymen and then forward to the incumbent or return to himself.
Paper, 1f
VML 415-416   27 May 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He now wishes to open his “plans somewhat more distinctly”; he is grateful for CT's offer of his quarters but he thinks he ought to be rather at Durham Castle as least inconvenient to himself and others, and, as this is the first such occasion since the opening of the university, he would wish to entertain the chapter and all holding academical office in the hall of the castle, with certain clergy and others in the neighbourhood, and when CT can come to Auckland they can fix a day, perhaps the last day of term or the day after (June 18 or 19) and draw up a guest list; he had also thought of inviting all the students to a dinner in the hall but that might “be too large an undertaking” and “not altogether quite unexceptionable”; if he could meet the academics at CT's house, he would be honoured to join the party, and he would also be glad to attend the lectures of the reader in Medicine and the Greek professor but he is wary of agreeing to too much lest he break down before his part of the performances; he would not expect to attend the examinations which would fatigue him and cause him distress because of his hearing defect; he would be grateful for the confidential advice of CT and Dr Smith as to whether or not he ought to deliver an address to the whole academical body on this, his first coming amongst them since the foundation of the institution.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 417   29 May 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
His letter assists in his planning; Wednesday 18 June will be the date for the dinner in hall at Durham Castle and he is happy to accede to his suggestion to receive the students “to partake of our cheer”, they can leave the question of other guests until it is clear how large the academical party will be whose numbers he would appreciate advice on; he suggests a high table on the platform for himself and chapter and university dignitaries with two tables on each side for students, each presided over by a censor and chaplain; as to other guests, he suggests the high sheriff, and he would like to add about a dozen clergy “who might take an interest in our proceedings” but he would be grateful for the advice of CT and Dr Smith on the expediency of extending the gathering beyond the academics, but he does need the numbers of the official body and the students; they can talk about the address when he visits, though it might best be done in the hall, perhaps on the day before the dinner, after examinations; he will attend the Greek professor's lecture and return to Auckland to dinner, or he could join CT's entertaining of the academics, if that is on the same day, and return in the cool of the evening. (Incomplete, ?further folios now missing.)
Paper, 2f
VML 418   31 May 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Does the number of 55 include students only or “also Members on the Boards”, he suspects the latter, which would rise to 69 with chapter and university officers; the whole should not exceed 80, with 20 on the high table and 30 on each of the other two, with high table comprising the high sheriff, chapter and university officers, with one of his chaplains presiding at each of the other tables, with Mr Chaytor and Mr Douglas Gresley at the other end, with invited members of the boards being at the upper end near the chaplains and below them, the young students who will be distinguished by their academical habit which the members on the board will not have; he makes these suggestions now as he cannot come to Auckland until 10th, not as soon as intended, and most of the arrangements must be fixed before then, and CT must keep writing with suggestions as they occur; he discusses how the invitations might be sent out, individually or “en masse” to CT as warden, with the students to be informed by the tutors; he apologises for troubling CT “with these trifles”.
Paper, 2f
VML 419-420   5 June 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He is uncertain over which guests to invite, wanting only ecclesiastics, except for the high sheriff, and perhaps only those on the boards though even that will necessitate some missing out “which may occasion unpleasant surmises”; he needs CT's advice and a short delay in sending out these invites is not crucial; they should have 20 on the high table but 2 or 3 more might be added on each wing; he needs an “efficient & distinguished person” opposite him on the high table “to do the honours” for him, perhaps the high sheriff, flanked by members of the boards, with prebendaries and university officers on each side of him, with on the wings each chaplain flanked by bursars and lecturers and the master of the school with more members of the boards, with the students arranged as the tutors may direct on each table, with Douglas Gresley and Mr Chaytor proper persons to take charge of the lower end of the two long tables, but they could be in the middle as links between the guests and students if CT can think of other persons for the ends; he apologises for all this trifling but they need some plan otherwise “things will run into confusion”; he cannot turn his thoughts to an address so CT must not commit him to one, though he does hope to do one.
PS Could he have his nephew Henry Douglas opposite him on the high table with CT and the high sheriff on each side of WVM.
With a list of totals of proposed invitations and numbers for the tables.
Paper, 4f
VML 421-422   2 July 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
Mr Brown of Alnwick having written again, WVM has told him that he needs another week or two for deliberation but he is inclined to meet his wishes, so he will await CT's further communication and also further information from Dr Ainger; Mr Humble's offer should be attended to and he will direct Douglas Gresley to take it into consideration re the arrangement he suggests regarding the episcopal stables if this can come under the provisions of the University Act; Mr Tyler's letter gives a discouraging prospect, the subscriptions of Lord and Lady L. are “neither in esse nor in posse” and he is happy to make up the £200 shortfall of their grant, as urged by the Bounty Board, to ensure there is no delay, as Bishop Barrington's Fund is already bespoken for other livings; Mr Wooler's advance from £800 to £1200 for the house referred to shows how the demands of the university have raised property values with no more cheap bargains to be had, so in future it might be more economical to build than buy as Mr Tyler opines, though he would appreciate CT's views on this.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 423-424   31 July 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
He found Mrs Van Mildert in an alarming state yesterday and sent for Richardson from Harrogate who arrived this morning to pronounce that the crisis was past so he is returning tonight; Lord Lyndhurst has asked, with Baron Gurney, that he should publish the sermon he preached on Sunday, which compliment he has thanked him for, but he needs CT's honest opinion as he does not like appearing in print without some special reason; he hopes to read his charge today or tomorrow; he encloses a letter from Mr Pellew which CT should recommend to the Durham Clerical Fund, also an application from Mr Leger of Darlington to which he is not so favourably inclined as he does not like his insistence on secrecy nor does he like lending money and he is not inclined to give him money as he could not help out every unthrifty clergyman liquidate his college debts, but he is happy to be swayed by CT's view.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 425-426   7 August 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
He has decided to print his sermon, but who should do it, and whether all in octavo or some in octavo and some in quarto, though the print run will be only 500 mainly “for gratuitous distribution”, and he would like to use Oxford University Press though Durham or Newcastle would be closer or Rivingtons of London would be possible, depending on CT's view.
PS On returning Mr Milner's letter, CT did not advise whether WVM should assist him in raising £100 for his living's augmentation, to match a benefaction from the Lord Crewe trustees, as he is happy to do so as the Barrington Fund will be needed elsewhere; when will he be in Durham and when can they confer; he encloses the letter from the Bounty Board that came with their last report on Gateshead Fell and he is inclined not to reopen the matter with all its complaints and disagreements, despite the Board's suggestion, but he would appreciate CT's opinion so he can send the documents to Mr Hawks.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 427   26 August 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“I am on the point of ordering from London a somewhat heavy package chiefly of Folios, for the Durham University. Can you tell me what will be the best & safest mode of conveyance for them, & give me full direction which the Booksellers may not misunderstand”; he is minded to attend the Sons of Clergy meeting next week, but he hopes he might meet him in Durham in the mean time.
Paper, 1f
VML 428   30 August 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is glad that CT is coming to Durham, and suggests he comes over [to Auckland] on Wednesday morning; CT's meeting at 12.30 on Thursday to address the king means the cathedral service may be too early for his attendance but he will intend rather to be at dinner though he would rather attend both; he has forwarded CT's note to Mr Burder.
Paper, 1f
VML 429   10 September 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is grateful for CT's distribution of his sermon, so he will send supplies to Bamburgh and the College; the consecration at Shields may be arranged to suit the parties, and he has thanked the bishop of Chester for his offer of assistance, and has asked Mr Joseph Davison for all to be ready; he encloses Dr Smith's letters to WVM of 4 September and to Mr Rose of 1 September which CT seems to be unaware of, which assume Professor Rose's actual resignation, but there needs to be some more official communication before a successor can be appointed; WVM would not wish to interfere and is happy to leave it to Dr Smith; yesterday's consecration at Shildon went well; Burder is expected on Friday for the ordination; he will leave for Harrogate on Tuesday or Wednesday.
Paper, 2f
VML 430-431   24 September 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
He is sorry that he has left one of CT's letters unnoticed for a fortnight; they survived the journey better than expected, but Mrs Van Mildert has since not been well and is now revived; his “local complaint” is now “grievously afflicting”, allowing him scarcely an hour's respite by day or night since the meeting of the Sons of the Clergy and he is now on a course of the waters there which have initially aggravated his complaint, so his public duty prospects are not good; he has not heard further from Dr Smith or Mr Rose so he has dismissed the matter; he conferred with Dr Wellesley and Mr Durell at Auckland about the care to be taken by chapter in the matter concerning the bishops whom Mr Rose thinks had been led to favour the university because of the implied pledge given by the chapter and WVM to the plan drawn up by him concerning theological arrangements, but care must be taken not to create such misapprehensions with the archbishops and bishops; he has asked for 25 copies of his assize sermon to be sent to Bamburgh and 25 to Durham for CT to distribute, perhaps chiefly to the beneficed clergy, and perhaps also to the duke of Newcastle, and Lords Grey and Tankerville as from the author.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 432-433   27 September 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
He only has a short time before the northern post goes to acknowledge his letter and its enclosure from Mr Ellison; he does not know the Mr Carr that both speak of, but he does not seem up to a weighty charge and incumbents seem rather to want young men looking for titles for orders or “for some aspirants to popularity who may satsify their fastidious congregations”, so he will bear him in mind and send him £20 or £30 from the Barrington Fund in the meantime; he is grateful for CT's distribution of his assize sermon, and he can check with Mr Humble, Mr Andrews and Henry Douglas as to who has had them already; he hopes the Norhamshire gentry and [Northumberland's] magistrates may come to some amicable arrangement with which he can concur; he will leave the chapter and CT to deal with Mr Rose; Dr Wellesley and Mr Durell will tell CT of his apprehensions about the bishops; any influence over them by Mr Rose should be guarded against; Mrs Van Mildert is as well as for some time past, but he is still a grievous sufferer.
[PS] Is Dr Smith with CT now, or not until November.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 434-435   1 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
(Marked “private and confidential”) Mr Durell's letter has reported the death of the bishop of Bristol, “a staunch friend to the Church & an estimable member of Society”; he needs to fill his stall without delay and CT is aware that WVM wishes to have one stall as a private option, so with this one not contemplated for either of the university offices, it could have been at his free disposal if their bill had passed, but it did not so does CT think he should bestow it on one of those offices and would he incur the “odium of selfish & unworthy views” by giving it to a private individual; he is prepared to sacrifice what might at his advanced age be his only opportunity of patronage for the good of the university if CT, Dr Smith and Mr Durell (the only members of chapter he will consult) think he should do so; he asks for CT's “real sentiments” as soon as possible.
PS Dr Smith has given him official and private information of chapter's decision re Mr Rose, about which he will write anon but the present emergency is more pressing.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 436   4 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Thanks him for his letter and asks for the annual average of the vacant stall; Mr Durell's opinion coincides with CT's and if Dr Smith's does also, then he will not hesitate.
Paper, 1f
VML 437   9 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
CT's opinion coincided with Mr Durell's and Dr Smith's so WVM has offered the stall to his nephew Henry Douglas who has consented “to be charged with the responsibilities of prebendal dignity”; he is communicating with Burder about the collation, and is also writing to Mr Durell and Dr Smith.
[PS] When does CT come to Durham; Mr Rose has pronounced his connexion with the university closed; “when you get to Durham, I shall hear what you think of the Books, from Cochran & from Bohn, for the University. If any of them are faulty, you must let me know.”
Paper, 1f
VML 438   11 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT, enclosing the following
He had intended to write more fully on Mr Rose's resignation, but he has already opened his mind somewhat fully on it in a letter to Dr Smith so he is now weary of the subject, and instead sends a copy of that letter (as follows) now to CT, in which he mainly depends on CT moving chapter “to devise some provisional measure for preventing the theological machine from standing still” as he cannot begin to appoint a successor to the chair “without such previous inquiry & consideration”, and he is “perplexed & disheartened by the prospect before us”; when CT is back in Durham, he will ask him over to Auckland for “more leisurely discussion”; Henry Douglas has returned to Whickham but WVM hopes to collate him in person, with Burder instructed to prepare the instruments, and he hopes he will ever be found “a worthy & acceptable member of the Chapter”; his quiver is now exhausted.
Paper, 2f
VML 439   11 October 1834
Copy letter from WVM to Revd Dr Smith
He promised a few lines on Mr Rose's resignation, commending Dr Smith on his official letter which could leave no reasonable cause of complaint, with the separation arising from the problems of reconciling permanent regulations in the interests of the university with Rose's particular interests; he wishes Rose could have viewed it so rather than seeing it as a difference in judgement between him and the chapter about his department; as term is imminent, WVM asks chapter to consider what provisional measures can be adopted to cope with the present exigency whilst WVM considers a permanent arrangement which he will ask CT to bring before chapter as soon as possible, the difficulty would have been diminished if Mr Rose could have been retained for this one term, but as it is WVM “must leave the matter entirely with the Chapter”; WVM concurs in Smith's good opinion of Mr Jenkyns but does not see that moving him from one chair to another will really help as the Greek professorship will then have to be provided for; he is also concerned about the damage to their “rising institution” from the loss of Mr Rose's “high reputation & extraordinary popularity” which will hardly be understood by the public or the episcopal bench, so the resignation must not appear to have been caused by feelings of dissatisfaction on either side or any misunderstanding between the parties; he would appreciate any suggestions to mitigate such apprehensions, and he will copy this doleful epistle to CT so that they can correspond with each other on it.
Paper, 2f
VML 440-441   15 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
Encloses a note from Henry [Douglas] and thanks CT for his letters; he is pleased at the news of the welcome for his nephew by chapter, he has a steady and stirling character; WVM collated him yesterday and Douglas has gone to Durham today to be installed tomorrow, all which has been done quicker than the appointment of a new bishop of Bristol which seems to be destined for Dr Allen of whom he knows nothing apart from a meeting at the Ecclesiastical Revenues Board but which he regards as “a harmless appointment”; he does not want to go further into Mr Rose's secession but his fears and perplexities about it preponderate over his hopes and expectations and it will be “difficult to extricate the Chapter from the troubles in which this occurrence will involve it, without coming to such explanations as it wd be very undesirable to make public, in the present critical state of our Academical concerns”; CT must tell him what communication he should make to the chapter at the start of the new term as some is clearly expected by the tenor of the sub-dean's letter to him of 29 September requesting WVM's “advice and instructions in supplying Mr Rose's place”; can he say any more of Mr Evans of Trinity whom CT formerly said was highly thought of, especially by Dr Smith; Mrs Van Mildert is very feeble and he is “a constant sufferer & much dispirited”.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 442-443   20 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at Bamburgh Castle
Sends three letters for an early opinion; Dr Smith's and Mr Johnston's can wait but not that from Mr Boucher to Archdeacon Watson, though WVM does not know enough of Mr John Fox to answer the archdeacon, even if he can imagine the sort of man he wants; WVM needs CT's view; Mr Boucher's views of the father's great attainment probably stem from hearsay rather than personal acquaintance; the Digswell curacy is probably not a very laborious concern but will give some scope for responsibility as the archdeacon will be away at Hackney for much of the year; the archdeacon reports Barton Boucher's recommendation of another of his former pupils which sounds promising.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 444-446   25 October 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
Headed “private & confidential”. He has delayed writing this to ensure CT's Sunday is not disturbed after his journeyings, but many things need observation; he is grateful to CT for relieving him about the Divinity arrangements for the coming term though he had been a little concerned Mr Chevalier might thereby surmise some intention of being put in Mr Rose's situation, until CT mentioned he was more inclined to the Mathematical chair; as to future provision for the Divinity chair, he might make some private enquiries of the master of Trinity re Mr Evans who seems to stand above other candidates; he impressed with his letter about the dissenters and his account of his own theological tuition, but has he written anything, hopefully not Rector of Valehead; Mr Whewell stands so very high in science that he can hardly have done much theological study though his treatise is sound enough and WVM might enquire after him also; if neither of these suffice then he might be inclined to Mr Jenkyns and then look for a new Greek professor, as one familiar to chapter [in Divinity] might be better than a stranger, but he needs CT's and Dr Smith's advice re chapter's view of Jenkyns, and he might make his Cambridge enquiries anyway; for the then possibly vacant Greek professorship, would Mr Peile suit, and CT and chapter could then replace him with another as tutor, as he is also already known to chapter and the two chairs would then be “apportioned to one from each university, a consideration not to be overlooked”; this is all confidential and only hints for cogitation; Dr Shepherd, he is probably too old (past 70), and too fond of Grays Inn, leisure and social ease to be keen on further advancement; although he has received a printed notice of the public sale of Mr Allan's collection of minerals on 15 January, he presumes that a private contract might still be possible which should not be passed by so he subscribes £500 with more available if necessary; WVM has written a private and confidential letter to the high sheriff re the North Durham and Berwick proposal about which he will confer with CT; Mr Newby will probably soon be asking CT to lay the first stone of Stockton church which he should not undertake as cannot some layman do it, WVM would but he could not attempt it with safety; he hopes the new church for Berwick will not be put aside and the parties can be assured of his cooperation; can CT tell him where to address a remittance of £20 or £30 as an annual donation from Bishop Barrington's Bounty to Mr Carr the late curate of Jarrow; are the boxes opened yet from Cochran & from Bohn & are the contents safe & sound; he apologises for his lengthy epistle and wishes he had the archbishop's brevity; this bitter foretatse of winter almost annihilates him but Mrs Van Mildert braves it in the open carriage, and his malady is somewhat easier.
Paper, 6f
VML 447-448   5 November 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT at The College, Durham
His nephew Henry [Douglas] reports that CT has repeatedly been asking after him; despite a fresh attack to the kidney and bladder the night before last he is not worse than before, though unfit for business of any kind and today's “attempt on the pile of unanswered letters has well nigh overset him”, yet they will converse when CT visits on his daughter's account but he cannot concentrate for long and his mind and body now warn him to cease for the moment.
PS Mrs Van Mildert has rallied after a distressing return of her complaint.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 449   6 November 1834
Letter from WVM at Harrogate to CT
He has had another sharp attack, since Henry Douglas left, which has subsided; come on Saturday morning as he can only admit visitors for an hour or two in the middle of the day as he shrinks from any exertion.
On the back of a note from CT to WVM saying he will return within a week when he has to go 100 miles south of York; WVM is to urge chapter to consider the Heworth Common tithes.
Paper, 1f
VML 450-451   24 November 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He is disturbed not to have heard since chapter and he hopes all went well there as he is anxious; he is still “a sad invalid”.
Paper, 1f + wrapper
VML 452   26 November 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He hopes to see him tomorrow, though he is still indisposed, and he will discuss matters then, except to say that Mr Chaytor's etter made no mention of the site for the college, but only the bill in parliament.
Paper, 1f
VML 453-454   1 December 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He is still indisposed though he hopes Richardson's visit will help; he consents to Mr Green taking £50 out of the vested Fund of the Sons of the Clergy, and he encloses a draft for £40 towards the other £81, and he would be happy to give more; he is happy with Mr Walker's suggestion re a chapel at Walker, and he suggests that CT consults Mr Davison about how to endow it; he does not know how to respond to Mr Chevallier as he cannot consider a successor for the Divinity chair unless his suffering can be alleviated; Dr Smith has written re Mr Rose's leter and other chapter maters which must wait for consideration; Douglas Gresley will go to Dryburn to confer with the high sheriff on the North Durham projects.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 455-456   13 December 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He is grateful for his satisfactory report of academical matters; he presumes that the Barrington scholarhips will be awarded when he and the two archdeacons next meet; he is happy with Mr Chevallier's arrangement for next term, and he would be happy to encourage his pretensions to the Divinity chair if he did not have reservations about him as a possible member of chapter, which might have been alleviated if he had been immediately appointed to the Mathematical chair on his arrival in Durham; has CT consulted Dr Smith, Mr Durell or the dean about [Chevallier's] suitabilitiy for a prebendal stall; he is glad that so many students have competed for the Prize Essy, and he would be happy to read those of Mr Pollard and Mr Cundill; at CT's hint, he will also look at the Poet' Corner in the Durham paper which has some clever things in it today; he needs reminding of the Spring Assize preachers and some help with a name or two; he is keen to see the schoolmasters scheme; he has been continually in pain and dsitress since seeing CT, with Mrs Van Mildert now better than him.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
VML 457-459   23 December 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
He is grateful for CT's two letters; he is finding it hard to overcome the listlessness of his indisposition; he will only now touch on topics pending face to face discussions, once CT has “sufficiently rusticated” at Ryton; he approves of the schoolmasters scheme which, if chapter concur, should be started instanter, with support from the trustees of the Barrington Fund, to whom application should be made by chapter rather tham himself though his name may be used; Mr Chevallier has reported on his lecturing to Divinity students last term and next, WVM is reluctant to enter into correspondence with him, though he is rather embarassed about Chevallier's and Mr Jenkyns's positions at Durham and he would like to take one of them for the Divinity chair, preferring to avoid a stranger, though he would willingly transfer this patronage to the chapter; Mr Peile's proposition also perplexes him and he cannot see his way through the stalls business as he feels he is not the man he was for public life; though he is happy to supply pecuniary aid, yet he must withdraw from such personal exertion; similarly he must expect the dean and chapter to carry the charter into effect as the prospect of what must be done for legislating for the Church in general quite overwhelms him and he hardly expects to survive another parliamentary campaign even if he can enter upon it; he discusses when they might next meet to discuss other matters.
Paper, 4f + envelope
VML 460-461   25 December 1834
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Ryton
The day's special duties only allow a few lines; he hopes he will come on Monday to help in “ laying siege to a Haunch of Winter Venison” when they can confer further.
PS He hopes CT may bring WVM's nephew Henry Douglas on Monday.
Paper, 2f + wrapper
1835
VML 462-464   7 July 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at Bamburgh Castle
He congratulates CT on his DD degree, only wishing the university had done him the credit of awarding it by diploma; he hopes CT is now enjoying the sea air after his travels and travails; does not understand the police clause for Durham University proposed for the Municipal Corporations Bill and does not know how to write to Sir Robert Peel about it; he is fearful of mooting anything re the charter with the present cabinet and thinks that any communication from CT would command as much attention with Peel as any from himself; he has written to Lord John Russell approving of CT's application for a dispensation; he needs CT's advice over the perplexity of proposing that Collinson at Gateshead exchanges with Gamlen at Crayke; he has written to Mr Chevallier re the Durham Assize sermon but he cannot recollect whom CT recommended for Newcastle; he forgot to discuss the Divinity and Greek professorships with Dr Smith yesterday, and both were disappointed that CT did not visit them en route to Bamburgh by using steam navigation; he had a kind letter from the archbishop, but it didn't say much on Church affairs; can CT enquire about Mrs McDonald of Holy Island who has asked for pecuniary assistance; can he tell him who the new incumbent at Lucker is as he has to send some Bounty Board queries to them.
Paper, 4f + envelope
VML 465   8 July 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He forgot to mention yesterday that they are beginning to try their venison and would CT like some at Bambrugh, or Ryton or Durham.
Paper, 1f
VML 466   16 July 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He has been prevented from writing or going to Durham by aneurism in Mrs Van Mildert's arm where she was bled at Harrogate and which will destine her to a life of painful suffering, and Mr Green agrees with Mr Richardson that no operation should be attempted; please can he tell Dr Smith, and he would be pleased to see either of them.
PS Mr Chevallier and Mr Eade have agreed to do the Assize sermons.
Paper, 1f
VML 467    5 August 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
“There seem to be insuperable objections to my purchase of the premises in question. If I purchase them for the See, I must encounter great additional cost in making new buildings, or be subject to heavy dipladitions. To purchase them for myself would be a most undesirable investment, nor could I do any thing but make them a present to the University. The removal of the Registry & other offices, I really think abjectionable, as awell as doubtful in regard to legal difficultis. The intention of converting them into a public house might, I should think, be frustrated by a remonstrance wth the magistracy on the nuisance it would create to the Bishop & to the College. Moreover, the sum of £1200, I am told, is more than double the real value.” His outgoings are excessive and this year's income is not good so he must husband hs resources, but he is sending Mr Davson to confer with Mr Humble before coming to a conclusion.
PS He consents to appropriating £100 from the Barrington Fund to augment Lucker, which CT might tell Archdeacon Singleton of.
Paper, 2f
VML 468   31 August 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is happy to be advised by CT over the chapel at Evenwood, likewise Denton; he also wants his opinion on Mr Thompson of Lanchester's request for a title for orders for his son who (from Dr Ainger) “ is harmless in conduct, & not unsound in doctrine, but of very slender abilities & attainments”; he has decided not to hold an ordination this year himself because of his health, but he wants to see the candidates' papers without delay and for them to undergo their examinations so that they can proceed with letters dimissory to the bishop of Carlisle or any other bishop who can ordain before Christmas; he is still suffering, and Mrs Van Mildert also with her arm, the lack of remedy for which distresses her; he hopes to see him soon though he has no special reason; he is wearied by writing these few lines.
Paper, 2f
VML 469   10 September 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is unable to solve the bishop's question; Mr Taylor's letter leaves him in the dark as to the Mr Boucher whom CT has recommended; he will write again re an ordination in October, as the bishop of Carlisle has offered, but he needs CT's advice.
Paper, 2f
VML 470    12 September 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He will forward his letter re the Durham students to the bishop of Lichfield; he is happy to receive Mr Boucher as a fit person for holy orders for Hartlepool, so he will need the usual papers; he will give public notice of the ordination once he has heard from the bishop of Carlisle - whom he hopes CT can receive as his representative - and Mr Burder; he will write to Prof Jenkyns as the matter ought no longer to be delayed; his ailments are very distressing and he feels generally ill as well as locally so.
Paper, 2f
VML 471   19 September 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He has not yet fixed a date in October for the ordination as Mr Burder is unavailable; the only papers he has for Mr Boucher are his nomination to Hartlepool by Mr Taylor, and Mr James should aso be instructed to send his papers to WVM; the two bedeswomen's places were filled weeks ago and he does not understand what formalities have delayed this taking effect; his ailments have induced procrastination over Prof Jenkyns.
Paper, 2f
VML 472   23 September 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He will announce the ordination in the newspapers as 25 October once he has heard from Burder and he hopes this does not derange CT's Berwick engagements; Mr James and Mr Boucher should have sent what papers they have in readiness as their examination needs to be fixed to suit Mr Strong's convenience and, if nothing comes soon, they have to await ordinations elsewhere; CT supposes him better than he is and the application of leeches to Mrs Van Mildert may remove some distressing symptoms.
Paper, 2f
VML 473   25 September 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Is his visitation on Tuesday to Auckland or Durham and, if Auckland, does he give a charge to the clergy, as WVM would like to give the clergy tea in the evening.
Paper, 1f
VML 474   20 October 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
Discusses arrangements for the bishop of Carlisle's [ordination] at Durham castle, suggesting dinner with Dr Wellesley, Mr Durell and other members of the chapter on the Saturday, with Mr Strong and Mr Wellesley to attend as chaplains and Mr Burder and Mr Douglas Gresley in their respective offices, and then the ordination on the Sunday, possible service options, and content of any sermon, with no time for appointing a special preacher; at all of which CT should attend, if he approves of all this.
Paper, 2f
VML 475   9 November 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He approves of Mr Moorhouse Thompson's appointment to the Barrington Scholarship; he discusses the admission of Irish students to titles for ordination in England which, though humane in the light of the persecution of the Irish Church, may be impolitic in denying such curacies to their own countrymen; he is distressed both night and day; he has written to the archbishop re stalls for academical offices requesting an early reply which he will pass on to CT.
Paper, 1f
VML 476-477   18 November 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He is forwarding with Mr Wellesley, as he is going to Durham, a letter from the archbishop which he may communicate to the chapter or just Dr Smith and Mr Durell as he sees fit.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 478-479   30 November 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT at The College, Durham
He is pleased to hear of the meeting on Wednesday for the relief of the Irish clergy who deserve their sympathy for their sufferings and admiration for their magnanimity and he asks CT to convey to the meeting his concurrence with their objects and his contribution of £100 to their cause, which he would have attended had his health permitted.
Paper, 2f + envelope
VML 480   30 November 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
CT's and the dean's letters confirm his view of the inexpediency of Mr Palmer's proposal which could occasion a schism among the clergy, which he has affirmed to Mr Palmer in writing; he has sent CT separately (next above) a communication for the meeting on Wednesday.
PS His resolutions appear very proper, though CT could more warmly express the first point of sympathising with the Irish clergy, and express more strongly the Protestant feeling that accompanies it.
Paper, 1f
VML 481   3 December 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is glad yesterday's business went well and he looks forward to a fuller report in the paper; WVM's communication was not confidential, having been read to the meeting, and he leaves it to CT to decide about submitting it to the press and whether or not to make it “ incog”.
Paper, 1f
VML 482   19 December 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is reluctant to admit Mr O'Donaghue as a candidate for orders in contravention of an important regulation of [the university] as it might set a precedent and, as he comes from Dublin, create an influx from there, but this is tender ground and he leaves it to CT, though he wishes Mr Wardle had not brought it up while “there are Englishmen in our own Diocese half-starved for want of employment”; he congratulates CT on another satisfactory term and on preparing regulations; he has yet to hear if Mr Jenkyns will take the Lent Assize sermon, and he has no answer from Mr Rawes re the Newcastle one; his suffering shave been very distressing, and he and Mrs Van Mildert are alone as Miss Douglas has gone to Peterborough.
Paper, 2f
VML 483   21 December 1835
Letter from WVM at Auckland Castle to CT
He is glad that Prof Jenkyns will do the Lent Assize sermon, and Mr Rawes the Newcastle one; he does not understand about Mr Manisty but all augmentations have been strangely delayed, with the intended residence at Shildon especially vexatious, so he may need an allowance until it is sorted which WVM is happy to provide, perhaps to pay the rent (£25 pa) with £15 or £25 more for a horse and family comforts; he has fallen asleep several times in writing this.
PS The mayor of Stockton is sorry that CT cannot be at the grand entertainment at the town hall for his swearing in.
Paper, 2f
VML 484   [1835]
Letter from WVM to CT at Patterson's Hotel, Brook St, [London]
He is glad that he is better for his journey [to London]; he had hoped that he might join him for dinner and he would be happy for him to come round at any time.
Paper, 2f
VML 485   [1826 x 1835]
Wrapper from WVM.
Paper, 1f, faded