DUL Add.MS. 1950/A/4 DUL Add.MS. 1950/A/1/i-iiiAntiphonale
Held by: Durham University Library: Additional Manuscripts

An almost complete leaf from a 15th century Antiphonal written in Germany, later reused as a book cover.


Digitised: https://n2t.durham.ac.uk/ark:/32150/t2mq237hr96q.html


Physical description of manuscript
Support

Parchment

Extent: Single leaf
Size: 342 mm x 220 mm

Condition of manuscriptRecto darkened, and text along the former spine-line partly obliterated.
Layout

Written space 250 x 170 mm. No pricking or ruling visible. 10 text lines + 4-line staves.

Script

Written in large textura, minims 5 mm. high, expertly.

Notation: gothic Hufnagelschrift; F in red and C in yellow.
Decoration

Capitals in ink lined with red begin the second half of each responsory and versus. Cadels lined with red, to each versus, 1-line + stave. Initials to each responsory and antiphon, 1-line + stave, alternately red or blue.


Manuscript contents

Three page letter, 21 June 1923 from J. A. Herbert, Department of Manuscripts, British Museum, setting out a detailed comparison with a Worms antiphonal (B.L. MS Add. 19415), from which this fragment differs.


Manuscript history
Creation

Written in Germany, early 15th century.

Provenance

Formerly the whole cover of a book in the Routh Collection, according to note by E. V. Stocks. Former reference: Portfolio I/3 (see Catalogue of fragments, manuscript and printed, amongst Durham University Library Archives and Special Collections).


Manuscript contents
Original title: Antiphonale (fragment)
Date: [early 15th century]
Language: Latin

Common of martyrs, nocturns 2-3. Corpus antiphonalium officii nos 6804/6805, 4751, 2999, 3564, 6274 with vers. A, 6891 with vers. A, 7590 with vers. A to regnum only, and 7023.

cundum habitare ... ... tradiderunt. Et in san


Digitised material for Durham University Library Additional MS 1950/A/4
Digitised February 2018
https://n2t.durham.ac.uk/ark:/32150/t2mq237hr96q.html

Bibliography

Hesbert, R.J., Corpus antiphonalium officii   OCLC citation, (Rome: Herder, 1963-79)